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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: June 4, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - June 4, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               Ill IHE SALEM DAILY NEWS. UII- NO. 131. SALEM. OHIO, WEDNESDAY. JUNE 4. 1890. TWO CENTS. f tlie Trattle on .oumlary Line. the POV. >tutt struck other OSIOX. O of K-Uiiia Killt.l v Injure.l. P.I eked Away in the Hold i teamer Xike Sardines ia a Box MA.NSKIKI.I., u., June 4. At o clock Tuesday afternoon, during a heavy storm, lighfiing struck Tracy A-.ery'sro-.Mi.-r -urns.-, located about a fuelcr fovcr of on Territory E'.Ibrt- to Tre- luijiort.it 1011 I'rove r.itile. ro.N. June Secretary iirv yesterday to the ttciics from L. Myers, ?s consul at Victoria, B. C., i Hard, consul at (Juaymas, to the smuggling of the United Under May 10, Myers repjrts iu de- .a'jc of tivcT'.ty-tv.r< Chinese iu-d State.-; from Victoria on )f May 1-. These Chinese the of Fttca by r North st'.r, i limi-h ve-- cr.ift -jf siiuig'rler. CM." Ou the Tth took out a clearance for Sat- and then hid away ia her util the night of the 12th. se were taken aboard about id then she slipped out of The Canadian collector was .out for her, but she got cty. A ing day at noon Inspector foung hired a tug and went His search for her was un- and the vessel also eluded at Port Townsend, livers notified of the facts in t is now certain she crossed Monday iii'jht and put her passengers on the American came into port on the morn- li and Mr. Myers surmised time of his writing she was 3 another trip. "She packs freight like sardines in a box ets out of the harbor, when o-.ved a breath of fresh air on charge is S'O ner head pas- y. If thi-i practice is not re cutters must bo placed on nd soies must be employed the Canadian authorities, in my judo-meat, working o break it up. Tnat opium cl in large quantities from have every reason to be- lard writes from Uuaymas of May IS: "Yesterday the oamer landed elev- en. These Chinamen were l.uatlan from tho Panama lima ou or about the Oth in- thirty-nine Chinamen per teatnor New Berne, from San (arriving on the .1th inst.) ns pore and are now at differ- iiMir the United States fron- jia, waitingforan opportuni- the border, and no doubt this will follow the same course. notified United States dep- jr Wilson, of Nogales. A. T., arrival so that he can inform Tr if Go St-ntcU the claims of the contcstue i-jiicw ug portions of the evidcnre he rof-TivJ to tiiu biun tittend.iace ill the House. Tue m.i'orltv report .-aid that the election in the distr ct of Alaoamu as a farce. Of au election was this? How members. outsHe of tht members of the Committee on Electio 11, had read the re- port of the committee? M1-. Crwp denounced what he declared the partiality of the elec- tions committee. Tp.is was in contrast with Democratic Congresses. They had often seated Mr. Kowell. ot Illinois, inquired whether it fair and honef! whereby oue party did all the counting in an election Mr Crisp replied, referring to the Kowcll supervisor bill, that the proposed bill was a dishonest pro- portion. After further debate the House ad- journed. resolution of the Louisiana LCR islature to ;md the President for the timely aid to the peo- ple in the submerged districts I. The resolution Oilere-l by Mr. Edmunds to in- vestigate the r'ish Commission up and after considerable discussion went over without action. The consideration o' the Mlver bill was re sumod. and Mr. too'j fio floor and de- votcU considerab.e attentio'i to a criticism of the tariff bill. The Silver bill wns tlvn wit 'n up and Mr. Pugh addressed the Scnaf: speech was 1-lrpply to a rv.l C -.11 of The t-Jfifl bill. He referred to Mr. HuttervuUh's speech m the House the robbery" o! the p-op e" by conivr cor.joritions: and nskeil how it u us a 5-. -lein produced such mon-trnus ci u'd to r. ceive flie of :t ere .t n ti.in.i" party that now had possession of v o ranch of the Government and had attain1 d restoration to power on thi merit- ot the protective policy. Returning to t.he subject un.ler discussion, he said that the necf-s tv for a more expansive currency wa> perfectU appaieatand exist- ence rould not be unored by Congress That necessity could not be m-t by any that came -hort of nuking asailab e tu.j entire supply Ainenean mhis-> to '-Jf.ure a tion KU tlo'ently v to the of the and t-> sty -heir and is lie alould therefore ]om hi- vote to th vole- of v.ere in favor of free umimtfd r U eoinaje of gold and silvei b.illion At the i-oiiclu-.on ot M_r speech the Silver Wll was Ind a iieand sev- eral S TI ite bills were from ihe and pas-.ed. The Silver bill taken up. and Mr. Fnrwoll addressed the Senate He declared himself in f'lll -vrUh t-e purposes of t bill but 1 th it ue was favor of (Torn? still furthor. K-j wo': us ".'jr inonf y all the silver offered io> a d siiin a  ridiculed by Mr. CocUreil. "The lat ter. c'.m upon .1 iem.uk that an Iron clad or e-. 'n i fo.irlh C'ass could levy cnn tnbutiinison the .-eaboard cities, said th'at he woakl lilce Great to li-rv .1 contnbli tion a PU kel oil Xju- Vo'k That act -.vould be followed aa i-ivaa.on of Canada am a confisc.-.-.ion 01 e-. erv na-liilo r.f property Great Britain. ..raounling to bil lion- n-.d l.i'.iiotis. The d was 1 at. u-reat length. It -.va-; part-iipifil in by Seiitorx Cockrell, P'.-.ve-. H.'! McPher-on. Gorx Plumb, Dolph. R and Piiitt Fina'lv the wa.- tak. n nr.d the was .ujreud to. Ad- ti' 'i .t 11  x n (11' .-1 j Minnie quarrel and Cl.i -vho is skull, v woman kirk'-n th': sii" into t I Kicks Another to if.o. .Ttinf Oordon anc Payt'in became involved in a early Tuosilay morning at Polk rk -tri'i-ts. (r.irdon woroan the jio-aes-or of a trfpannee r.o Tnar-.h for the Dayton kni-cked her down anc h'-t- s" tiddly about t'ne head f She tp.k'-n f .-ixt va-a u> 'A _ !i .v V av i. r -.vhcre ii'-r injuries la'.i'.. 5 at :h" Harri Ijersci FOR TARIFF K ".ad I'hilndel- -To Aeikiiist "f StcKluU-y Hilt Pmj-APKi.i'iiiA. June business men's meeting was hold at the Walnut Street Theater Tuesday afternoon, at which Alex K. McClure The .obacco. tin plate and woolen industries were largely represented. Among tho speakers were Congressmen McAdoo, Springer, Bynum and Breckeuridge, of ventucky. Last night a :nass meeting of work- ngmen in textile roods was held at; xensineton, and was addressed by tho same gentlemen. Hoth meetings woro called for the purpose of protesting against the McKinley bill. Thers were 7.000 to 10.000 people at the Kensington meetings, and three overflow meetings were necessary. A jig parade of workingmen preceded tho Resolutions were declaring that both p had prom- sed to amend the tariff as to ren'ovo unnecessary burdens and enlarge our markets: that the party now in power aad, on the contrary, proposed to add to the burden and restrict the market by the McKinley bill: and the meeting would be satisfied with nothing short of Tee raw materials and such general re- ductions of tariffs as to cheapen tho necessaries of life ;ind open foreign markets, thus securing steadier work and more comfortable living for tho workingtncn. DISTILLER SHOT. OHIO mm Ilceortl of I-afe Fvonts Tills or v.'- to In- ituul l-.t.t uuijkin. n: J.cxi A l> >aAN-riri.i'. C.. eucamp.r :lt An- HcUl tti Mans- I'romisol. t. T.r> eighth of th Ohio Divis- KlUn H Man AVlio to Sell a Smull Oimiitity of KKOXVILLE, Tcnn., June P.eports received here state that Bud Lindsay, Deputy United States Marshal, shot and killed Kilts a distiller, in Campbell County Monday. Lindsay g-ot enraged beca se Kilts refused to sell him a smaller quantity of v.hisky than ten gallons. Tho distiller's son. thinking his father in danger, threw a stone at Lindsay. Lindsay then attempted to shoot Kilts, but his party took his pistols from him. They left and, when a mile away, Lindsay asked for his pistols, say- ing he would do no harm with them, lie got them and immediately rode hack to Kilts' house. Krlts saw him coining and locked tho door, but Lindsay broke it down and shot Kilts tv.-ice, killing him instantly. lie then attempted ro shoot the boy, but missed mm and bit a Htrie girl, slightly wounding her. It is reported that Lind- say's party arrested him and pave him over to the -heriff of the county. Lind- say is a desperate character, having murdered a prominent citizen of Camp- bell County five years ago, but escaped through lack of evidence. UNITED They- Demand of Christ as the K.iler of the >'atiou unit Couclcmix Secret Societies. BcKFAr.o, X. Y., June 4. tho United Presbyterian General Assembly yesterday the report of tlie committee on reform was unanimously adopted. A petition to tho of the United States was adopted that ho should make a distinct acknowledge- ment of Christ as the supreme ruler ot the nation in the proclamation issued at Thanksgiving tim. A resolution was embodied condemning all laws relating to divorce and nennittiiif tho breaking up of n.arrL.ge iclations en other than spripttiral grounds. Resolutions favor- ing the use of the I'ible in public schools and condemning secret societies were also adopted. _ Convicted Forjrc-r Mioofi Ilimvlf. UTICA. X. Y .Tune 4. When the jurr in tho of -.vho has been on trial for forgery at Hcrki- mer. yesterday announced n. verdict of guilty. Stoddard arose and wont TO an anto-rootn of thf court pulk-d a revolver from his and shot him- self through the head. It thought that he wili die. The is the most sensational ever tried :n Hcrkimer County, and the; at its close erf att-d great excit'.-Trent. in fi: ir. '.r. .'ir r .a.'. ;nr .Tt ;..-..T3 r-.n jr.to s tT'-iz's.'. :-i. -r.. -i Tl -v f..-. t..v' :c said >ast nJsriit lhat ol the Pi-vtO.urgh NV.Uonru bad of at nt1- -r. ..r.-'v.tl -Vj'. in ion of in city June 10, 11, 10 and will undoubt'Hlly b" the tr.o.st largely atti-nuvd and most suc- ce-sFiul yt-t Tl.e c-nouiupmont will be military and the visit- ing ipotnbors of the order will fto into Camp on tho fair grounds. Mcllvaine has made extensive preparations for the event. At strangers arc expected during each day of the en- campment. The prograr.ime is as fol- lows: First day: Business meetings at 10 a. m. and p. m., at Memorial Op-ora House. Second day: P.usiaess meetings at 9 a. in. and p. rt.; camp fire in Memo- rial Opera House speakers, Governor Campbell, ex-Governor Fora- ker, General P. H. Bowling, General Charles Gritlln, Colonel W. E. Bundy, Mayor McCrory and others. Third day. Business meeting at nine a. m.; military parade at p. m.; bus- iness meeting at p. m. Fourth day: Business meeting at S a. m.; competitive drills at p. m. al the fair grounds. The prizes are: Foi the host drilled and equipped camp, di- vision stand of colors. There are six other prizes ranging from to S100 for the camp having tho largest number of members present in the camp mustering the largest number of members since January 1; for the camp performing the ritualistic work in the best manner, and for the camp making the best showing in all particulars. HACE FOK A BUIDE. Indiana Couple Married by mi Ohio 'Squire Attar ft Hot Chase the Girl's Father. CixrixsATU June 4. Harry Goodwin and Cora Skinner, of Lawroncoburg, Ind., ran away Monday to got married. They found 'Squire Sterling- was at Eliz- abethtown, O., just two hundred yards over the State lino. As they reached tho 'squire the girl's father could be seen in the distance pursuing on horseback. Sterling, grasping the situation, told the lovers to clasp hands and run for In- diana, as the license was not good in Ohio. The three scrambled over fences and on crossing the line the 'squire stumbled and fell, hut had just sufficient breath to pronounce the words as the angry father galloped up, too late. A large crowd witnessed the race and cheered the bridal couple. READY TO .STRIKE. Drjvern nnd of a Columbus Street Car Company About to Ouit Work. Cor.iTMUue, O., June 1. There is a strong probability that the drivers and conductors of the Consolidated Street Railroad Company will go outon a strike to-day, the company having refused to accede to the request of the men for an increase in wages. Drivers now get-51.47 per day of twelve hours. They ask fif- teen cents per hour, or 51. eO per day. while conductors, who n.r.v receive SI. per day, dfmami sixteen conis an hour. or Sl.OC a day. Tho coir.junv ofTered tho men an increase of about seven ccnU a day, which was refused. KrotluT ami SN'n-r .l.iiliol for O.. Jtin-? Hvhard Ua nnd Mrs. Molvin.i brother and sister. arrested here iho other nigbt for bcin.r ia the act by offi'-.r-r i'.trc from the pemt'-n'.iary a :Vw ago. al which time his her Thompson. living as the unnr.tur.il brother. Thev were Mayor Corns   tl.i.- Uviilior under the I'overof iiiiat. He-r 'v'.'..pp. the iru'imakerof Essen, bas male .v to construct a shin can il thf Danube with the Soa. There is a revival of tho labor troubles at Vionna and numerous strikes are ro- lorteii as occurring at various places in the Austrian empire. Germany. Pr.in..c, an'l Switzer- land have a i.-. a'.y the prcsision of is still unwilling to -v There was a -.rorni of rain, hail and wind at .huper and HuiiUiigburg, Ind., the other hut no serious damage was done by it. John S. Ui-11, Chief of tho Secret Serv- ice Treasury Department, has been removed from his position. His successor has not yet appointed. Herman Oelrichs, of N'ew York, and Miss Theresa Fair, daughter of es- Uuited States Senator Jaiaei G. Fair, were married rtoently at tho home of the bride's mother in San Francisco. It is learned that Maude Fisher, the young girl whose body was found in a reservoir near Jsew Britain, Conn., a few days ago, h.id bi-t.-ome insan on the subject of religion and committed sui- cide. The trouble between tho builders an3 masons at Xew Haven, Conn., has heen settled, the builders prosing to pay first class masons forty-five cents pei hour. This is generally acceptable tc the men. Formal adhesion to the Congo tariff, as defined by the conference, has heen jjiven by all tho delegates to the anti- slavery conference in at Brus- sels, with the exception of those who represent the United ihe French stunner La Uourgogne arrived xt New York on the -Md, two Jays overdue. The delay w.v5 caused by the shoe on oue of the shafts becoming over- heated, and the vosii'l had to lay to for forty-eight hours. She passed four ice- bergs. The McGurgan and Minor the two largest buildings in Pa., were burned recently. Loss 000. The buildings were occupied by R. F. Dulancy. grocer. .7. T. Ross Co., furniture dealers: L. M. Travis, dry goods dealers, and Walton. The London Times says the sendintr of American cruisers 10 Bohring Sea smacks too much ZS'apok'on's methods, and thinks that British men-of-war should promptly follow. The pressure of the Irish vntc. the Times thinks, has changed Mr. Ulaine'sdcsire to settle the fisheries question in diplomatic man- ner. A At The Actors' Fund anniversray oxcraise1! at Palmer's Thea- ter yesterday v.-erc attondi-d by ox-llres- ident Cleveland. Cor.oral Sherman. Gen- eral Horace Porter. Daniel Dougherty and many other A. 1'alnjf-r presiii'-d r-i.d E-i'-vin Uooth, Barrett an! tr.anv noti-d ac- tors wore pr. r.U Ci.jvland, General Shonr.an and bpoke. THE" MRKETS. p.-rc. i.-w-r. tSJ'iCt I-'. r.iv- :o.-viv-.-. ,-..7, .md 3 M.-.n-M.n .v. >3iSJ K '-1 V.-.u -T N" N1 r. 1 X'-C U" N" .T N- K-.: a- Kat.r.v tJc f.a a: :ae. l.r f. -.ir.o'H Uc 4 -y 1'3 i" :il ii !-'11U T -j 5.1 V--53 -1 ll ;m ;---Hfe m :W I -lib ff j L   

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