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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: May 15, 1890 - Page 1

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Location: Salem, Ohio

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - May 15, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               [HE SALEM DAILY NEWS. II. NO. 115. SALEM. OHIO, THURSDAY. MAY 15. 1890. TBAILIXCCQTTUEHV. AWFUL TttAGEDY. rles Tariff Adraa- Members Bitter Speeches. Silver Mil la the lator Who li-HOCM-The HoaM on tbe to Mil confer- of the tariff bill !d Mr. Bynu-Q, of Indiana, i duty on common re to Often per cent ad va that, taking this clause m B Customs Adziiaistra'lve id that the duty on earthen tased from ten to fllty per icnigan. ?d that tho to reduce theprlce ot imer. This contenncn who ridiculed the Wea that prices tbe msnufacturera less asking tbat tarirt r benefit. sail that the ry dollui the mcru.ise of Ue tariff. As a manufao- the Insult uhlra dei-otii a as rotber barons Ohio, ridicule 1 Mr loted testimony ot a rcaau- omraittee to tae e.Teot that ariff In to compensate been charged the other DO of plantation manners; i Massachusetts was now >n was defeated to 88 adments looking to a reduc irthen and glassware were 10 success. e discussion of one of loMlllln alluded to a Mr irgh. a ifluss minufacturer. i from for-ign labor, while iia jorting forr-ign labor in rite: Labor law. >d to that Mr. Camp- that on the contrary Mr. Mot supporter of Mr. Har- Campbell M a p-rjnrer. ictore the Ways and a consultation with the eat Vlrr.nla (Mr. WUsoa) n hact goai away and made 8 false from b -ginning to sll ev'r cwni lato his i By would be in the cell of the ttne further remarks Mr. Committee on Ways and tion of iu Mil had closed to! against tbe labor of the i tbe manufacturers. that the imputation of the ma was false He did not npute to the committee my lack of courtesy to the sixteen of the pages of x rose and the House ad- ieg the registry ot House bill approprtat ng building at York. ana ktiue for a public Ql UL. were passed. then taken Dp .and Mr. Seaate. He said he had A promoting the price of r was an American prod- American ought to advancing its prico. The the United Slates was in- nson with the great inter- at nere mvo.ved In re- ts a money metal. It was pry of human. ty. In the la- in the Interest of progress. wbol-? human race. iipeeea, Mr. Teller go Into executive sess.oo. Te Silver b'U Senate procealail to Th- rotlowlac bills were la relation to tbe par of E- Jewtt. retired ialtow- aa4 of ra Seaate bill or Jo-.n Howard Payac. 5BAUL. t States marshals arrived here resting Mayor Cottrell Mitchell, on the charge oi assaulting Custom. Collector Pinkerton, and inter- fering with him in the prosecution of liovernment business. This action of the Government authorities is the result of a series of outrages perpetrated Cottrell, in most of which he has d and abetted by Marshal A genuine reign of terror his existed here, the full details of which will probably never he known until Cot- trell Is safe behind the bars, for the peo- ple do not dare to speak against him so long as he is at liberty. The United States officers succeeded in arresting Mitchell yesterday, but Cottrell was ap- prised of their coming and is now in hid- ing. They are on his trial, however, and hope to arrest him soon. For about a year Cottrell has been a terror to the cituens here. He has com- pelled a negro to beat a telegraph oper- ator; he has threatened to thrash women whose husbands had incurred his dis- pleasure: has kept men locked up ia jail for days at a time for no cause whatever; has paraded the streets with a loaded shotgun, threatening to kill anybody who came in his way; has shot at the lighthouse keeper in the street; has cut another man with a knife, and actually forced a re-election as mayor because it was worth a man's life to vote against him. Those who know Cottrell best say he will never be taken alive, and it is rumored that he will come to town and attempt the rescue of Marshal Mitchell._______________ CJLUB MAN JN TROUBLE. Arrent of One of New Society Lend- on fur Circulating- a Jfmmph- NEW YORK, May B. Mus- jrove was arrested yesterday at the Union League Club, of which he is a member, on a warrant issued to Augus- tus D. Fasidi, of Rhinebeck, N. Y. Mus- grove is charged with sending an in- decent pamphlet libeling relations of VIr. W. W. Astor to complainant through ;he mail. JMusgrove was arraigned at the Tombs before .Justice Gorman, but as the complainant f-tiled to appear the case was until Monday. The matter referred to is in the shape of a type-written pamphlet an.l is entitled 'Statement of a Lilack-nailiajf Case The story in the pamphlet is remark- ably sensational. It relates to tha nns- ortunes of a Wall street broker in tnm- ng stocks, w_ho__is. said to have, been blackmailed By a man and woman .hrough schemes of an extraordinary nature. Tbe male schemer is named ia the pamphlet as -'James S. Armstrong, a near relative of Mrs. William Astor." Names of other prominent people are mentioned, among them Evelyn Gran- ville. tbe actress, who is said to have been mixed up in the case with Arm- strong. _______________ BY A LAKGE MAJORITY. IVry Ask for Sub-TnsMiuica to Their of tbe ffcrwen' Allt- MnMi T is Heeded to Paj TMr Order Ifct- elAni tA Abotrah In CMMlltBliM. X. Y.. May jren- eral convention of the Order of Rail- y Conductors has decided by a rote to eliminate from its   and that th would l.s s-'-h until Ta May MasoAa, the chairman of the legislative toe of the Farmers' National Mliaara. continued his address before the Ways and Means Committee yesterday ia favor of the Fielder bill to establish a system of sub-treasuries for the reception of grain and other farm products. The scheme, he thought, would not over- stimulate production. The real inequal- ity from which the farmer suffered could not be met by a simple increase in the volume of currency. The farmer needed some radical assistance. He sold his produce in the fall, when crops were lowest, and purchased his supplies when other products were highest. Mr. Flower, a member of the commit- tee, asked Dr. Macune if he did not think that the opening of the sparsely settled portions of the West had not in- jured the farmers on account of the easy communication with all points by means of railroads. Dr. Macune did not think so. Continuing, he said that the farm- ers were actually starving themselves in order to pay their debts. He had no doubt that the scheme he favored would greatly benefit the agriculturists, and he cited instances of the establishment ot similar ideas in the Argentine Ee- public and other countries. Mr. Flower said that his objection to the scheme was that it would simply be a precedent for the extension of gov- ernmental aid to other industries. If the plan were adopted we would have to grant similar protection to the mining industry and "other industries. Before a great while the Government-would have every hock." He be- lieved that the farmer would be bettor off it he regulated his own affairs. The States and the the general the best judges of the amount of currency needed. The believed! could obtain more benefits under ths State bank system that once prevailed in New York than from any aid such as that provided for in the bill under discussion. The com- mittee adjonrned at DEATH -ix Another Accident at Ky-. Jfem Killed. LoinsviLt.E. Ky.. May six o'clock last evening, 'while workmen were engaged in the construction of tbe upper part of a caisson used in the ex- cavation work for pier foundations of the new Louisville and Jeffersonville bridge, the caisson, while being- shifted in the strong mid-river current, broke from its moorings. Tbe air chamber, fourteen feet below the surface, filled with compressed air. aad whea the hawsers parted the buoyaacy of tbe submerged portion tbe caUtoa caused It to svddealy tura over, with it tbe acaffoldiajraad wgrkmea. Tbe feltowia? naatrd killed: C MilchclL of City. assistant ss of aa iron projrctlac thr mrtknj of Urc May 15.-The drive ef the stage line running between Washington aad Brownville gives graphic account of a triple murder a county. John Crouch fanner, his wife and son Andrew, age roaght about the trouble. Page naa wea seat to the iafirmary. O-. May Hiram towmaa. of Caaaam. this county, pre- pared breakfast tbea loaded aa old laakct with backshot. facteaed tbe gaa the porch. tW a wine trijr- aanJe to brr If ft. brcact load. U'bca losad bcr man drad aad her fire. i act. TWO CENTS. STKCCK AN ICEBEJtta With Moaatata. bat QCEBKC, Que., May Allan Une steamship Parisian, which here Tuesday night from Liverpool, narrowly escaped disaster off the of Newfoundland. A heavy fog pre- vailed and the steamer waa eautiously at the rate of six mileTan hour. The lookout sighted a big Ice- berg about forty yards ahead. The en- gines were immediately reversed, bat the steamer ran onto a portion of its, distance of about twenty feet For a time the huge snip shivered from the shock and great excitement prevailed on board, a panic being pre-' vented only by the self-possession of the officers. The vessel lay on her broad- side for a full mimite and Captain Kltchie ordered all hands on deck and the crew to stand by the boats. The vessel, however, soon settled back Into clear water, uninjured. Had the vessel been running at a greater speed nothing cculd have saved her from complete wreck and a large loss of life. BOYCOTTEDJ5Y FA KM BBS. Trade In an Indiana Town Paraljzed by the Action of DECAXCB, Ind.. May hun- dred farmers belong to the thirty lodges oi the Farmers' Mutual Benefit Asso- ciation that surround Warren, a town of people west of here. Their ob- ject is to compel the merchants of that and other tow ns to sell goods to them at ten per cent, above cost. Merchants generally have refused to do so, and the society has withdrawn its trade from the town. The boycott is effectual as was ever inaugurated by Irish tenants, the fann- ers having made arrangements to estab- lish a general merchandise store in each township, under the immediate auspleae of tbe association. Fully ninety per cent of the farmers have boycotted the Warren merchants. The local news- paper of twelve years' standing has been forced to suspend and merchants are talking of closing business. Even the merchants of the larger towns are alarmed on account of the rapid growth of the society. Flret Arrent Under the TsVw Law. SAX FKAXCISCO, May first arrest was made Tuesday under the new city ordinance requiring the removal ot all Chinese to a district on the outskirts of the city. The person 3hae Yuen, a member of the firm of Chy Lung Jt Co. Shortly' after the arrest Consul Bee, on behalf of the prisoner. apoUed.to the Circuit Court for a writ of habeas corpus, settlngr forth that the prisoner was a subject of tbe Emperor of China. The writ was granted and tbe prisoner was released on bail. May The treat interoa- doaa! agricultural exhibition was opened Wednesday bj Emperor Francis Joseph in person, in the presence of an imnwase concourse of people. Fraace and Italy stand at the head of the fot- nations repmmated by fa tbe importance and of tbeir dis- plays. an well as by the elaborateness ef detail manifested ia their arrange- Me.. Mar first case ia was manjpjjfal crrort had a aai ale Jn J Jsc- bal Sw wax xa ajrrat aw! 3: an Uw rwr-lt- l ift it wao jiul a It.rf1.tir xr.xx-.ill 1.V, t.i.ih- TnUVUry lull, jnc 1w Arw-tf.   

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