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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: May 12, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - May 12, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               FHE SALEM DAILY NEWS. IL NO. 112 SALEM. OHIO, MONDAY. MAY 12. 1890. on, O., Visited Storm. Either Totally De- er Badly Damaged. Injured M m Revolt Awful Power of Dev- At o'clock Sat- ornado struck the south- of the city, and passing sat destruction. A large irhich had been hovering i western horizon all af- 3, down upon the surface ibout five o'clock and be- tn angry-looking cloud lly along the ground. u its course was torn to street, Wilson Kiplin- red mother, his wife and er seated about a stove, tvip inger was preparing ouse was caught by the into the air and shaken ve occupants found them- together in a heap in a 1 rods from the house. had sustained a scalp iplinger was badly burned i and body; Royal, aged cut and bruised severe- ally. Bessie, the baby; ed about the head and recovery is thought im- Eliza Kiplinger, aged .y not recover. John Van Alt's grocery ,s neatly as a carpenter e the work. The barns e and John Austin were kindling wood, the resi- r with small damage. er. a shoemaker, was at I shop when Mrs. Dorai- >r, rushed in to seek op was rolled over and. were severely cut and if Turn Hall of the Akron vreuked. Tho residence mel was carried several j'ing on its side without Mr Manuel aid a boy at the time and rt beyond a severe shak- lanlt's brewery, incuding 1 ice houses, was ruined. E. C. Baker was wrecked. ght refuge in the cellar ;y, aged seventeen, s and sustained injuries bably prove fatal. Mel- lenec was wrecked. Mr. a broken leg and severe cs. E-lward Douglass, a r, v.us blown into a tree ere by the tornado. He hurt. rmaun, of Grant street, ife and three children in preparing supper, .ding was carried across le storm. All w-jre hurt, y. Mrs. Herrmann and a 3re considerably burned ae.--. the tornado Mrs. Caro- ms driving along a street timber struck horse, li'v.al an'l leaving the pant unbu-.-m- d. jneware Company's pot- e partially wrecked. en- of 3G.OOU. At least forty ither totally wrec-c-rl or as to require timbjr of people re- in addition to ths n. May li the Union iy. in a pine box two feet I the horribly m-.niiatf-i in. Almost, all the flesh tb? and the were lauiijati-d beyond body pock'-d :a -11 life br-CT f-itinc-t more Tho J.o.iy w 'j road at St. LouU. t Y.. May l-i National Kank WILD WKSTEHS WINDS. Several taronrh as ov-rdraf; nrjth a An wa CHAXUTK. >_ struck Cedar Valley. Wilson County. Saturday. WHtscy-g houae waa demolished, ni, .youngest son killed and two otaer injured. Next the dwelling of Frank Glidden was de- his wifo killed and two other children injured. The dwellings of Peter Pierson, Alex Russell and the wtdow Starr were leveled to the ground, and Mr. Pierson and wife so badiy in- jured that they are not expected to sur- vive. A scantling was driven complete- ly through the body of Mr. Starr. The wife and babe of Rev. J. R. Chambers were blown in different directions out of a buggy. A second blast picked the mother up and deposited her alongside the child. ST. Louis, May Reports from dif- ferent parts of Missouri state that a large amount of property has been de- stroyed and several persons killed by the violent storms of the past two days. In Harrison County the house of William Willson was blown away, his two chil- dren killed and several persons injured. Twenty baildings were destroyed in Gentry County and Mrs. N. Green was killed. Near Memphis, six dwell- ings were jlown down, but nobody was killed or sariously injured. CON D ACTORS' CONCLAVE. Ar.tTlog at Kochector, N. Y., to Attend the Spirited Oott- Orer the Election of ROCHESTKII, N. Y., May Delegates to the general convention of the Order of Railway Conductors, which begins its sessions at the City Hall Tuesday after- noon, began to arrive Sunday, and there are already at least 200 representatives of the order in the city from all parts of the country. Taere are 254 divisions of the order in the United States, Canada and Muxico, and reprasentatitea are ex- pected from each of them. A spirited contest is expected when the ofi-c-M are elected. The present Grand Chief Conductor, C. H. Wheaton, is a candidate for re-eieetion, and Grand Secretary William P. Daniels is said to be a candidate for the office. The New England delegates are also said to hava a favorite, and other candidates are be- ing quietly boomed. It is understood that a effort will be made to erase th vc el n-.sa from the constitution which strikes. The present Chief Corulv cor is outspoken in his op- position this his po- sition'will undoubtedly affect his candi- dacy for re-election- lS VN INTO A HAND CAK. Tlir  V- paid Sr Settled. CUICAGU. May The 625 employes of A. H. Andrews' farniture factory will go back to work to-day. The strike settled Saturday at a conference be- tween the employes committee and tho firm. 15y ibe terms of settlement the gx-t a marked increaw- in pay and half a holiday during July a-id It is "expected that VK'S wall Ire returned at tbe Malle- able Iron t'j-dar. molden bare had   Mes- Who Stole Skipped to Central Ajouerlca and Kitradlted. PHILADELPHIA, May Edmund S. Crawford, charged with having, on May 4, 1888, while a messenger in the Ameri- can Exchang National Bank, of New York, stolen which was given to him to be conveyed to the Adams Express Company's office in that city, waa arrested Saturday night on the ar- rival of the steamship Signe, from Rut- tin Island, Honduraa. The package was addressed ta the Treasury Department at Washington, and when it reached there it was found to contain only slips of paper. The ex- press company paid the loss after a few weeks of fruitless "detective work. Crawford resigned his position as bank messenger and went to Central America. Crawford was arrested last March in Spanish Honduras and confessed to hav- ing stolen the money, ot which was found on him. Governor Hill, of New York, signed papers for Crawford's extradition and on these he was brought back. He has been taken to New York. THE NATIONAL GAME. National League, American AMoelatlon and llrotherho d Gamed. Following are the records of Satur- day's games: SATIOXAL LEAGUE. At 6, Phila- delphia 4. At 1, Cincin- nati 11. At New 8, New York 3. At New 2, New York 7. At 7, Phila- delphia 12. A.MERTCA3> ASSOCIATION. At 7, Ath- letics 5. At 2, 6. STTXDAY GAMES. At Louis 4. Toledo 8. At Windsor Beach, N. 10, Syracuse 1. At 5, Ath- letics S. At 0. Columbus 10. _______________ Connplnttora Arrctteiir Bosroy. May E. Gillls, whose photograph shop on Charles street was burned in January and again in March, has been arrested, together with David Punch. John McDennott. W. J. Murphy and Charles Herins. charged with conspiracy to cause the fires. Punch formerly ran an ink factory, which waJ5 burned last Oclobt-r. He and GillLs were traveling with a photograph Car when arrested. Cfcituren Killed l.j las Tr-r. TEKKK HA roc. May Lafc Hamcs was dririnj a field of Min-hall oa Saturday, with four children an bit btigcy. a tree was blown dowai. failing acriKs tbo buggy. children, one soa.ajrrd four, and other. Delia N.inc swelve. wore outright. One werioasly injawd and the escaped. May County rraad jary. of Cwviajrioa. SniaViwsu on of 7 TWO CKNTS> LATEST NEWS ITEM3. From Seven hundred men employed at tbc Hamburg-American steamer docks ai Hamburg, have g-one on strike. Tho Philip H. Sheridan Association will erect a statue to memory of General Sheridan in Park, Chicago. The Department of Agriculture's re- port of the condition of winter grain 01 May i makes a reduction of one point wheat, the average being SO. Secretary Proctor has made a seconfl allowance "of for the relief of tbe Mississippi flood sufferers. This an unexpend d balance of SSO.OOO. The bakers of Halifax, N. S., have de- cided to strike if their demand for hou a a day and a week is not graitMd. They now work fifteen houEt for a week. George Francis Train arrived at Lon- don on the 10th on his journey around the world. lie held a levee at tho Vic- toria Hotel and then, started for Queens- town en route to New York. The meeting of the executive commit tee of the National Republican Commit tee, called to meet in Washington oc the 1-th inst., has, owing the of General Clarkson, been postponed in- definitely. During thp recent storm at Frank forV Ind., lightning struct the electric light plant, completely ruining the dynami of the street service. The damage is about Si, 000, besides leaving the city without light. Sarah Uernhardt to ill. During the, prison scene in her recent performance of Jeanne D'Arc a splinter entered hot knee. The wound, at first trivial, has grown more serious, aa in- flammation has set in. :k'iiator William withdrawn from the contest for Democratic nomination for Coogratt from the Third renasylvania dUtricfc tho represent d so long by the late Samuel J. Randall. A deal has been completed by capi- talist! of Minneapolis, Minn., for the' establishment of a large piano factory there, employing 800 men. TheMehlis' Piano Company, of New York, is ab- sorbed by the Century Piano Company, of Minneapolis. TCiile liy From Flat. LA. CK-HSK. May Sunday af- ternoon Rewey, e'ngineer at Davidson's mill, and ex-postmaster' Oliver Olson, of Midway, had some ficulty in a saloon in this ciiy. struck Olson wilh his fist, killing instantly. The murderer was run and captured at Onalaska. THE MAKKETS. Flour, FrovMoa. NEWYOIIK May Closed at f per o -ct the lowest ratu; highest 8 per cent closed stcuJy. Posted rites 4ST, ;.u.a.U for sU'.y Will -or demand, J Qovernm.'Dt bonds clo-cd stc-v3y. Cxirrenof 6a at lit, coupi n. at liS do nt 103ii. CLEVELAKD, May Country at Minnesota patent ut Miimesot.i spr'ug at So. 2 rtd uc new No. 9 rei, High mixed 40c, Ho 3 red at 38c. Xo. 2m_xed at3Jc. No 2irbite at iOt, No. 1 mixed at a3c. creamery at dairy at lOc. :rcw York at I2c, Ohio at9c. Strictly fresh Uc. Gluo at per bnsheL NEW YORK. May Strong n'glisr. Fias at si Minnesota extra at at city mill ex- tra at We ik. Xo. 2 red winter May June at99c. Cons ?fo. z mixe'.'. do May at 41 Sc June at 41 "1C. OATS Jfo. 3 a. red at SCjc, May at Jane June at ifi.rw. .Irly at BCTTEH Western cre.imerj fancy at ISe. Djll and 53-ic. CHICAGO. MST May M Juae at WiUc. May Jnno atJISC. Mar Jane at Jui? st f 1.1.1 i Mar n at Jnly mt tS.ITS. Mar JCark't lower. at V'-c. Tt >y at June at Dali. May JJatkct No 2 j tr eath al Xc, a- M. Mav ilarkrt "low Ti-'5ce and ro'.I-d n aoJ JTI--T. M' hrary M a-. ai t.4 aiartf-jt Nal-rea al 3W. r TSI 1 J% H f-. "A. T- :i...r 3 j. l" f-s j w iv   

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