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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: May 10, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - May 10, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               FHE SALEM DAILY NEWS. IL NO. 111. SALEM. OHIO, SATURDAY, MAY 10. 1890. TWO CENTS. t Law H M No for Them. from Canada Into d States in Numbers. tlM noranee of American COB- of the Kxelu- >x, May Ingalls i before the Senate a let- i Acting Secretary of the tsmitting copies of reports agents at points on the Ca- er upon the question of the exclusion of Chinese labor- ent stationed i Bridge, N. Y., in his re- -entio'n to information re- i that there is a largo num- men now in Toronto, re- 'd from British Columbia, lieved, will find their way ed States. j Co. and Loe Wing, of To- 3, are prominent leaders of ymen and are said to re- i for landing their couutry- the line. Close watch is part of tbe frontier and s.ts have been made within B weeks, and this he thinks s have a tendency to check tion of these persons, but sason to believe that it can together. and return to Canada, he D have the effect of causing k some other outlet, and ,ances where special agents and returned Chinamen to the same are now engaged peculiar to their people in ew York. If the depart- should direct that every m found unlawfully in the ;s be removed to China, a pt to come here will not be 3 present system not .eep out this undesirable ler phase of tbe subjectand caused some embarrass- ikely to become more seri' iinese persons are found un- ae United States, smuggled and that they do not have lowing that they have paid i customs tax. They can rned, as under the circum- Dominion customs officers admit them, and he re- epartment to give some in- iching on this matter, rent Brooks reports from ad a, under date of May 1: rs the case of Ah May and has bacn before United 1 Pope. These Chinamen ic from Vancouver, B. C. ise of taking his brother to se doctor in the United May wanted to cross the ic and they would have wtory evidence that they d to admission had he not and objected for the reason consuls or collectors, as a e nature of the evidence re- of of a Chinese right as a sntar, or what constitutes nder the restriction act. tes Consul he says, is mtative of his class of ofti- knows absolutely nothing legislation affecting Chi- he been supplied with any law restricting Chinese im- excluding their laborers, ainese have not crossed the r cover of the seal of this ist be because they did not by that route. The State can not too soon put into our consuls along the Ca- r a copy of all laws regard- mmigTation and exclusion t decisions of the Treasury umler these laws. lie says y infurmr-.l from Chinese organized effort dur- year. unlawfully put over led States upwards of 200 PENSIONS AND TARIFF T tht and H Several WASHINGTON, May Senate Friday la d> sculping the Pension and Anny Appropriation bills. When the Pension bill vag taken up, Mr. Sherman's resolution la- creasing the number of peng.on agents by two led to a lively debate on pensions in general. Mr. Cockre'l cMicized the action ot the Senatt humiliating to the Committee on wna, which had been ridden over rough-shod aj the Republican majority in defiance ol every ptwewiton made by thai party for the last twen- Afier farther discussion Mr. Sherman's amendment was agreed to The bill was then passed and the Military Academy Appropriation TiLwas lhea laken UP and passed. The Army Appropriation bill was then taken "P- Hale moved an amendment to the bill providing that uo liquors, beer or ine be sold or supplied to enlisted men at military posts. Mr. Cockrell moved an amecdment to Mr. Male s amenum sir king out beer jnd wine, out lor lack of a quorum no vote was reached on either and the Senate a journefl. House passe t the peasion bill ot Mrs. Deli i T in amendment mak- ingtne rate of pension per month. House then wc-ni into Committee of the Whole on the tariff bill Mr Fitih. of New was the first In criticism of Mr. McKmley, Mr. Fitcri said th.it, baring tailed to do what he h.ul promised in hie speecn of two years ago on the bill, about, tobac- co, and done wnat he had not promised to 'do about sugar, Mr McKmley went a step further and repudiated all his contained in that speech. The bill was a make-shift to a political situation. Mr. Gear or Iowa, quoting the old proverb, a Hussion and will find a Tartar." applied it "Scratch u Democrat and you will find a free trader." He claimed that the bill was in pursuance of the demand made by the people in the Us.t campaign. He defended the bill, especially its provis onsln regard to sugar, and maintained that its passage would destroy the sugar trust, "the great American devil Mr of New Vork argued in support of the bill, especially of tho-e features which he contended would beneht the farmer. Mr. Wheeler, ot Alabama criticized the gen- eral features of the bill and denounced all spe- cial powers and benefits conferred by it. House then took a till eieht p m, BASE BALL. One Among the_____ Brotherhood and Association CLEVELAND, May are the results of Friday's games: NATIONAL I.KAGUE. At New 8, New York 16. At 1, Phila- delphia 6. At 5, Cincin- nati 10. At 1'LAYEHS' LEAGUE. At New 4, New York 9. At 7, Phila- delpnia 5. All other scheduled games postponed AsrenicAX ASSOCIATION. At 7, Syracuse 4. At 4, Brooklyn 2. All other games MAN AND WIFE KILLED. Quarrel About a Back Yard Fence In the Shooting of Two by a De- tective. ROCHESTER, N. Y., May about o'clock "last evening Detective Lynch shot and killed two of his neigh- Stoddard and his wife. Stoddard was a hard customer. Lynch accused him of hacking his (Lynch s) back fence with an axe. Stoddard, who was drunk, became abusive and called Lynch hard names. The latter took hold of Stoddard, who attempted to hit Lynch with an axe which he had in his hands, wherenpon Lynch drew a revol- ver and fired. Mrs. Stoddard was stand- ing just behind her husband and the bullet struck her, killing her instantly. A second shot killed Stoddard. Lynch then surrendered himself to the author- ities. He claims he acted in self-defense. "in the Kile of a C.. May Stokes, an. attempts! to drive a m tbo, room and poked her animal ca- poa an 1 buried her irm. animal held ua la-jly ih.il it was ihc rx-foro release trie man from the ri. taken ilL 3J< Of B.tnk Teller Arrested. Dcr.i rn, May II- Pope, the defaulting bank teller of Louisville, Ky., was captured near here Friday by detective Crawford on bor.rd the boa' Dixon. bound for Canada.. Pope was teller of tbe Louisville City JCationa Bank. Early in March he abscondec ivith about of the bank's funds It was then discovered that he had been H-ving a Jekyll-IIyde life. He had been regarded by his friends as a very mod est man. inclined to piety. It came ou' aiterwards. however, that he had been living a fast life. ttffisr Chnrrhtnen. Cir S. C. May dio- cesan contention adjourned yesterday The sf-ccders before i-.djournment filed a protect against, the adoption of the com promise, which they claim does not ex chide the negro clcrgmen from the con vention if the bishop to admit, them. A protest is filed by clergy wen. eirht delegates and about i03mem of the church.________ frotn thr Ao.vlum llnrrnr. Quc-. May tn._All the male of Lonrue asylum are able to work in creclinr a I'-wprary bu-.Idin-. Many of the arc turning up from all parts country. More charred rc- 1 taken out. Friday. ia< thf G. Dun CO.'s Weekly view Trade. Toln of Transactions Centimes Exceediiic Last Year's by Ten Per Cent. Tbe Upward te and Other Shown to From Fear of Scant NEW YORK, May G. Dun A Do.'s Weekly Review of Trade During the past week the business uatiou nas changed but little. The out- ward manifestations vary somewhat, but the leading facts are still the enor-, mous volume of traffic, the expectation of monetary expansion and the ab-j sence of disturbing forces. There just now so much repetition from week- to week that it seems less worth while for once to recite them than to look for the forces which are likely to control- details in the future. The most potent of the present favoring influences is the prospect of increased monetary use of silver in some form, though no prog- real toward accord of the two houses of Congress seems to have been made this week. There have been some indica- tions that extremists might insist upon passing a bill which the President might veto, and markets were affected at times by this fear, but that is past. Labor controversies oause less inter- ruption than had been anticipated. Set- tlement and arbitration at Chicago and concessions at many other pro- duce confidence of early and amicable adjustment, so that any serious disturb- ance of industry may be avoided. This has enormous potency as a factor favor- ing prosperity, and it outweighs the fact that capitalists and railway have not been able to settle their putes. Railway grow more couraging and the great cut in through rates and the confession of trunk that the inter-State law has been tematically violated or evaded, have de- pressed stocks at one time, notwlth-, standing continued gains in later Reaction in wheat became distinct, but was followed by another upward jerk when State reports indicated that, the official returns for May would show" no improvement in condition. It come to be recognized that injury to' winter wheat may count for fifty million bushels at least, but spring seeding has covered an increased ac eage and a larger yield of that kind would natural- ly follow higher prices. Iron shows no great change, the radical fact in that branch being the transfer of part of the, instead o'f north- ern field-. The increase in wool supply this year can not be large, but the expectations of higher prices so generally entertained by growers tend to embarrass the manu- facture. Boston sales were ten percent more than last year, with prices stiff. Movements of meats continue heavy. In general, operations in products are remarkably large, with advancing prices. The dry goods business continues of full volume, and the shoe trade is also larger. The volume of all trade shown by the exchanges outside New York re- mains about ten per cent, above last year's, which in turn was the largest on i-ecord. The money market is fully sup- plied, with prospect of increasing abun- dance. Vn W-imlerlnirs. DECATUR. 111.. May 10. -M. G. Patter- ton, a well-known architect here, nysteriouslv disappeared last Decem- ber, has been found at Salt Lake City. He says that while on his way to Bloom- mgton lo attend to some business he ivas sandbagged and robbed of 81.590. iVben he regained consciousness he was ra a Chicago boarding house. He again lost his mind and when next conscious ivas in a hospital at Halifax. N. S. He romraunioatcd with friends in Decatur, ,vho took him to Salt Lake for his health. He is slowly recovering. Fire. Gr.ovK CITY. Pa., May three j'clock Friday morainjr Sre of incendl- iry ori in was discovered in Forest's barber shop on Main street. Before the flames could be checked all of the dis- trict between tbo Grove Cit- Banking Company's building the tracks of the I'ilKburjrh. Shenanjro Lake Erie railroad clean. Upwards of bnvn'j'w houses and dwell- The in esti- mated at SHVKW 10 S40.00C: insurance saialL _______________ IHtl. Mar Keu.iunefd Prot- Oune Back to _________. Quo., May 10 tartlm, aa ex-Roman Catholic priest, Hit BOW a Methodist minister, has dis- from home here and _ j unable to get a trace of his whereabouts. By aome it is believed that he either been abducted or that he has been prevailed upon to leave his home and family and return to Rome and there renounce his new faith and more promise allegiance to the loly Father. The missing minister is thirty years of age. He was ed- ucated at Paris and officiated for some years as priest in a small village in Normandy. Four years ago he crossed the Atlantic and became parish priest at the village of St Martin, in Wiscon- sin. There he fell ib." lore with his pretty housekeeper and put 'himself outside of the pale of the priesthood by marrying her. He then renounced his allegiance to the church of Rome and came to this city with his young wife. Here he was taken in hand by several Protestant ministers who took a lively interest in him, and he was soon placed in charge of a Methodist congregation. He entered upon a violent crusade against Cath- olicism, and it is claimed made many converts to Protestantism. It is re- ported that just previous to hia disap- pearance he was visited at his home by two nuns and that he bad also been communicated with by Father Lacroix, of the St Louis Catholic church. These facts create the impression that he has gone back to the Catholic church. His wife, who is left alone with two small children, is greatly distressed at his disappearance.____________ WHIPPED THE DRUMMER. A Man Badly Beaten j White of S. C., Who Believed He Inciting to Oo on a Strike. AUGUSTA, Ga., May F. Rich, a- Boston drummer, was attacked by a mob of white men at Laurens, S. C., on Tuesday night last and badly beaten with switches, his injuries compelling him to remain in bed until Thursday. Mr. Rich has been traveling through the South for ten years, selling a patent laundry iron, the principal users of which are negro washerwomen. In order to attract purchasers he has been in the habit of renting a public meeting place, where he would deliver a short lecture to the negroes, usually upon the subjects of morality and temperance. Rich had held two such meetings at Laurens when some colo red men told of the. white citizens that he was advising'the negroes to refuse -tcrwofk on Sunday and to strike for higher wages. This information was believed and the whites organized to pvraish Rich for his alleged attempt to create dissat- isfaction among the blacks. While Rich was on his way to his hotel he was set upon by the whites and unmercifully thrashed with switches. "'tot While BiirfrlarlxInB. ST. May Kunolt, president of the singing society of St. Matthew's church, and a director in the Men's Christian Association, was shot and killed Thurs- day ni-ht while he and a companioc were fleeing from a carpenter's shop where they had tried to commit burg- lary. George Slaltk amp, tbe owner ol the shop, saw the two men trying tc effect ar. entrance into the place and fired on them with a shotgun. The entire load entered Kunolt's body and he fell dead in his tracks. His com- panion escaped. Candidates for Din-rtor of the World's Cjnc.vr.o. May 10 E. T. Jeffrey has declined to accept the position ol director general of the World's Fair, owing to the importance of his private duties. Among othT nam es mentioned for the position is that of H. H. Stone, until recently or.e of the vie'' presidents of the Burlington railroad. -T. W. Kvck- man. who directed tbo International Maritime Exposition at last year, is also spoken of- for tTheaf- 111.. May received by the State Tv-partment of shovr thf of winter floods and fir will reach rwr of the sc'-ded fall. Th"   Recent Happenings Among Citi- of Ohio. GARFIELD MEMORIAL. the CijtviLAXB, May music com- mittee of Garfield memorial services state that they are in receipt of numer- ous inquiries in reference to arrange- ments for the chorus. It is impractica- ble to answer these inquiries personally, and desiring that the plan adopted should be fully understood they take oc- casion to again announce that the music for the occasion will be furnished by a grand chorus of not less than five hun- dred voices. That seating accommoda- will be provided for all singers in the amphitheater to be constructed for the dedication ceremonies. The chorus will not be made up by a combination of musical organizations, as such, but will consist of individual singeis without re- gard to any musical association. Applications of those wishing to be- come members of the chorus will con- tinue to be received by the committee, until announcement is publicly made that the complement of five hundred is full. No personal notice of acceptance will be sent to applicants. The place and date ot rehearsals will be duly an- nounced in the daily press as soon as ar- rangements are completed. The pro- gramme will be of a patriotic and na- tional character, and not requiring many rehearsals._______________ LAID THE STONE. by the of Lake Erie Seminary Hall Monument BaUdlnc. PAJnrKsvii.i.E, May large cen- tral stone in the entrance of the new Memorial Hall of Lake Erie Seminary was laid Friday by members of the grad- uating class, seventeen in number. There were no formal exercises, but the class sang a song in praise of "Alma and all classes joined in sing- ing an anthem and in scripture recita- tion. A copper box was placed in the containing seminary documents, class records and names of contributors. Among the papers was an original poem in Japanese, written by Mr. Serata, a student in the seminary. The former students of the Painesville and seminaries and vifcinity met in the Methodist church and formed a branch association of alumni. This movement is the outcome of the meet- ing of Pittsburgh alumni April A subscription of 8500 from Mrs. William Shaw, of Pittsburgh, has been received. Woman BnTettfen oti Street. WASHnroxour C. H., 0., May young woman who arrived Thursday from Dayton and took supper at a hotel without registering, went out on the street after supper and shot herself dead. There was no clue to her identity except a printed slip giving an account of a suicide at Rome, ind., on January 8, of a young man, with a written note, "Duke is just and a card inscribed, "Adin W. Gauntt, Statesville, N. Y., traveling salesman for Richmond City Mill, Richmond, Ind." She was about twenty-two years old. Caldwell'A Flinr Deirrratlon Bill. WASHINGTON, May tive Caldwell. of Ohio, introduced in the House yesterday a bill introduced by S. 8. Cox in the Forty-Sfth Congress, to prevent the desecration of the United States Sag. The bill provides that any person who shall disfigure the national flag, either by printing on it or attach- ing to it any advertisement for public display, shall bo guilty of a misdemean- or, and on conviction shall be fined not over 830, and imprisoned for not less than thirty days, or both. Ohio Statf Fair rrocrannm. Coi.rMin-5. May Ohio State fair will open September at Colum- bus. Wednesday, the K.tli. will bo Grange day and Governs- Luce, of Mich- igan, and -T. H. Brigham. master of the National Grange, will sp'-ak. On Thurs- day Secretary Rusk, of the Agricultural Department will speak, and Friday will be Alliance dav and the officers of the wesvem and northwesf.-rn Farmers" Al- liance will speak. Cincinnati FallnrM. May II.   STRIKERS. State of AU..I, Jk Ohio York Work. MAYSVILLE, Ky., May strike on the Chesapeake Ohio railroad reached here and all section and gravel pit hands quit work on account of the new order compelling eleven hours work per day. An attempt was made to fill the strikers" places, but the negro strikers arrived with guns, pistols and ilubs and drove tho other negroes off. It is reported the road will invoke aid from State troops. EUUKA, N. Y., May thou- sand miners are on a strike in tbe semi- bituminous coal fields of Tioga County. One thousand miners at Antrim wenton a strike Thursday night The miners ask for a restoration of their pay to that of a year aq-o, amounting to from flve to ten per cont, increase all around. CuicAHO, May 10. The Malleable Iron is yet idle, awaiting the pleasure of its employes to resume work. The efforts of the conservative portion of the strikers to induce the majority tc submit an amended proposition to the company have not yet succeeded. The company has heard nothing from the men and is making no effort to either resume operations without them by hir- ing new men, or to induce them to re- turn. BOSTON-, May carpenters' strike remains unsettled. Builders out- side the association are'gradually set- ting men at work under the eight-hour system. The lock-out at the Squire packing house remains CHARGES OF FRAUD. PennnytvanU Politician Alleged to Ha Committed Perjury In Obtaining Hli Naturalisation WiLKKSnAiiHK, Pa., May C. F. Jenkins filed a petition in the Pro- thonotary's oilice -here yesterday, the like of which has never before come under the cognizance of the Luzerne County courts. The petition prays that the court grant a rule to show cause why the naturalization papers of Alfred Martin, burgess of Plymouth, should not be annulled, for the reason that they were obtained through misrepresenta- tion and fraud. Jenkins alleges in his affidavit that Martin, in order to obtain, his full papers, swore that he came to this country when he was under eigh- teen years of age and resided five years in the United States and one year in Pennsylvania, when, as a matter of fact, ho was over twenty-ono years old when he landed and had not resided here required length of time. The court granted the rule and the case will be argued on the 20th inst. Great interest is manifested in the case, owing to the prominence of Martin, who has been a leading politician here for many CHINESE KIOTEK8. Warring Engage In a Pitched Battle With Fatal Reinlti. Los AXOKLKS, Cal.. May A riot occurred here Tbuisciay night between the warring factions of Chinatown, which resulted in the killing of one Chinaman, serious injury to another and the wounding of a white bystander. Ah Lung, a member of the Ah Low fac- tion. brusliod against Wong Ki Lung, of the Wong Chee faction, and the latter resented the fancied insult by drawing a revolver and killing Ah Lung. A fu- silade followed, fully forty shots being exchanged. The police arrested 100 of the rioters, every one of whom carried a revolver. Tbo Wong Chee faction de- clares that every member of the Ah Low faction will be killed. Piuvencer Kates Will be Maintained. Cinr.vc.o, May 10. Nineteen lines have adopted the new agreement of the Western Passonjrer Association. This includes all lines necessary to the miilntenanco of rates east and west of the Missouri river, in the territory of the old Western States" Passenger As- sociation and the Trans-Missouri Asso- ciation. with the exception of the Wis- consin Central. In addition to the lines already in. it is assured that the Denver Uio Grande. Kio Grande Western and Colomdo Midland will join the associa- tion. _ Cattle JTKI.EXA. Mont. May 10. Tbe year shipments of cattle from this State will reach nearly 100.000 head, which is an. of at head over last year's shipments. The average price paid iast ywir was bat an advance of u> SI is this roar. Cattlo its-" now in fair condition winter -s will amount to ivn per cent frairlr In tin? :X W. T.. May Praim v Willow Teek n'-ar Alberta. The prairfe U i flf.OWIaad raaci ile the with Tb" Tb'- a "S.av If--r JJT ;i. -mef -A- sra3 -BBS f ._ _ _ ._ f_____. k -if-rriV y., r-i-..e T _ Tin J _ s -jf-jv-mrtr j i iftn: fc 1 ill   

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