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Salem Daily News: Saturday, April 26, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - April 26, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               SAXEM DAILY NEWS. IL NO. 99. SALEM. OHIO, SATURDAY, APRIL 26. TWO CENTS. tractors are Begin- to Weaken. Uilroad Fireman uen Denaad IMMIGIIATION INQUIRY. FaeU Omt fey th and r a of the la of the Country. 1 The Master Car- ilders' Association L to a conference with i the Citizens' Associa- >ss carpenters' associa- ting carpenters to-day, strike to an tasters, in promising to committees, made tho ;hat they should come appointed the time for ,e first concession made lince the strike was in- i plan of arbitration ia t will take nearly a 1 the questions now in re, a non-union carpen- way to do some repair- at Forty-third street ag, was set upon by six knocked down, kicked insensibility. When bleeding from several head. The police are its. April 26. The Pan- officials handed in their ands of the federated ittee yesterday. What was not mads known, L to be unfavorable to Supreme Council of the ation has been sum- )robably hold their first ay. The local commit- oubt but that their ac- dned by the Supreme ing the case, it remains >fficials to compromise me Council or a strike mia railroad yard fire- i Station baggagemen ested an increase in gagemen ask for an in- month. L, April All tho Indiana Midland rail- it on strike on April 1 work on condition that iem since last December thirty days, have re- ey. Nothing was paid and they all went out using to return unless tied." n., April The em- derate price tailors of a a strike Friday be- 5 refused to sign the 53 made by the Tailors' fty men quit work and d by the union until re acceded to- il -26. The mill hands of this city have de- a nine-hour day. The asked for the appoint- littee by the bosses to stion of a nine-hour day. ro.j April 26. The man- ion Pacific have con- ise of 510 per month in tnployes of the eastern but can not agree in division. All fear of s is thought to bo Arrested. roar- ;irshal Ilara and officer this city, arrested at norset County, yester- Wilt, Edward Brisban, d John Sipe, all charged ting. At the house of is found a mold for half s counterfoil money, and lined from one of the nd Sije are coal miners i brotncrs are contrac- NEW YOBK, April D______ Owen and Stumpf, of the Congressional joint committee on emigration, returned the inquiry yesterday at Castle Garden, William Coverly, passenger agent oi the Arcbor Line Steamship Company, said that his line had during the past year brought steerage passengers, one-third of whom came on prepaid tickets purchased in this country. There were prepaid Italian tickets sold. Only about 470 of this number were sold in blank, the rest being filled in with the names of passengers. Scotch immigrants generally went to Pennsyl- vania, and the Italians to New York. About one-third of the Italians return to Italy for the Christinas season. They come here with a pack, but sometimes require half a dozen trunks on their home journey. They return in the spring. James Savrey, of the American Emi- grant Company, testified that his com- pany has settled familes in the West. The company now does only an exchange and prepaid ticket business. Their agents, who aro scattered through- out Sweden, 'Denmark and Xorway, so- licit immigration. While not chartered for banking business, the concern had at times large sums on hand for .their transmission. Coroner Levy, president of the Jewish Emigrant Protection Society, stated that a majority the Jewish emigrants came here from Russia and Poland, and a mi- nority from Germany, but all the Jew- ish emigrants compared favorably with those from other countries. As presi- dent of the society be came in contact with Polish and Russian Jews princi- pally. Between and of these classes came over in the past year. Inasmuch as they were persecuted in Europe on account of their religious be- lief, his society endeavors to assist them. They do not encourage emigrants to come here. Fifty per cent, of all the Jewish emigrants who came here last year will be naturalized citizens in ten years. Most all carae to make a home here. _______________ FIFTY-FIKSTJOONGICESS. An Appropriation of SH50.OOO for Flood in tlie Valley Fusses Botli Branches. Apnl 3t5 Mr. O'Netl presented the proceedings of a meeting- of bust- ness men ot Philad jlphia and a memorial with signatures of the board of tr.ide of that city asking the aid ot Congress In the promo- tion of the building ot American ships to trade with loreign ports, and to establish direct mail communication with the western coast of Africa; referred Mr. Cannon reported a joint resolution appro- priating to enable the Secretary of War to distribute rations for the relief of people in ihe district overflowed by the Missis- sippi and its tributaries The joint resolution was to 24. On motion f Mr. Butterworth the House went into Committee of the Whole on the Leg- islative Approoriatiou bill. An amendment was adopted prov'dinst that hereafter cvrry applica- tion for eiamt ution before the Civil Service Commission shall be accompanied by a certifi- cate of an officer of the county and State of which the applicant claims to be a this provision not to apply to persons who may be In tne service and seek promotion or appointment ia other branches of the Government. An amendment was adopted providing for the "actual" traveling expenses of the commission, instead ot "necessary" traveling expenses, as provided in the bill. Mr. Butterworth. gave notice that ho would ask for a separate vote In the House on the amendment, saying that "actual'1 traveling ex- penses might banlCTTipt the Government. After discussion ot an unimportant charactsr the House at five p. m. took a recess. The even- Ins session to be devoted to pension bills. Senate resumed consideration of the Railroad Land Forfeiture bill and Mr. C.ill went on with his argument In favor of the amendment offered by him as to the forfeiture Of railroad lands in Florida. Pemlin? the discussion, the Senate passed the House joint resolution appropriating 5150, 000 to be used by the Secretary of War for the relict of destitute persons in the district over- Cowed by the Mississippi river aad its tribu- taries. Consideration of the land forfeiture bill was then resumed. Mr. George followed Mr. Call in sdvocacv of the proposed amendments. Mr. Pa? coc took the floor aad the bill went over to Monday. Eulogies on the late Keprescnlntive Edward j Gay of Louisiana, were pronounced W Sen- ators Gibsoa. Cockrell and resolutions declaring the sorrow of the Sccils were adopt -d of respect, the Senate INFLATED VALUES Remit from Prwqpeeto Cw Trade are bfe, Save from gone Southern Potato. AN EXPOSE EXPECTED. HUtorr or the Yvrk Lh.- landed Dlntrict. La.. April The re- yesterday broach t pie and a number of cat- rerjlowd district. Tho iy negroes. Theyre.idi- as a number of :e interior arc here look- The break ia the old is fiOO wide, aad the Grand is rapidly. adjourned. Old Celebrities Cader NEW YORK. April tbe pas- sengers by the North German Lloyd steamship Trave, which arrived Friday from I'.remen- were Francis Cook aad Laxly Cook, the latter better ktiowa to the American public Miss Tennio C. Claflin. and Mr. John ttsddulph Mar- tin, the well-known Tyonaoa banker, and wife, who be for? hT rnaTriaje was Victoria C. Woodhull. a   Sixth National, Equitable and Lenox Hill banks, caused great agitation among the smaller fry connected with he affair. Some of the latter declared that they hoped all the facts would come at, while others expressed the belief hat the less said about the matter tho are Tiaal. In tbc trial of a. for T. S. Tf-cu-rday that A for April Williaa coaat-cted ia busiaess with Lawjsoa. of Lawsoa was arr-jsv-d b-r- Kritsav nadcr an iadictaicat found :a Ycrk Citr caarriar witb wJta ia York aad iVtvUm ia- _ llr. Lawson, whose trial for plotting to tbe Sixth National begins declared that he was a victim, and bat a full statement was just what woild clear him of all suspicion. Bank Jxaminer Hepburn seemed nervous and eaicd certain rumors that have been ireulating to the effect that his action in closing the Sixth National was pre- mature and his subsequent movements were open to criticism. Sigmund Meyer said that he was thinking of causing lebody to be arrested for alleging that he was connected with the wreckers. Taken by Coftfremlonal Com- mittee to This Famous Case. LITTLE ROCK, Ark., April witnesses, mostly negroes, were examined by the Clayton-Brecken- ridge investigation committee yester- lajr. Each of the negroes swore that for Clayton for Congress in the ite River precinct in Woodruff Coun- ijsatthe November election. A recount of votes in the White River precinct sujpwed 210 for Breckenridge and only 44 for Clayton. The majority of the negroes who testified were unable to rtiad. About forty witnesses from Pine Bluff, die home of the late John M. Clayton, will be examined to-day and next "week about 500 'witnesses from Plummerville, where Clayton was assassinated, will give their evidence. An effort will then be made to not only reveal the identity ot the parties who stole the ballot-box, but also to find out who killed Clayton. FATAL PCGIJLISM. An Exponent of tbe Art from the Effects of a Blow Rec Ived la the Ring. BOSTOX, April a pugilistic exhibition given here April 17, under the auspices of the Bay State Athletic Club, James Fallon, while sparring with John Murray for a gold medal, was knocked insensible by a terrible blow on the head just above the left ear. All efforts to restore him to consciousness failed and he was taken to his, home Thursday night a medical examination was made and'disclosed the fact that the blood vessel in the left side of the brain had been ruptured, causing paralysis on the right side of the body. Fallon diet last night. Murray and William Nor ton were arrested yesterday. Terms Made Known. NEW YORK, April to the proposition of the California Ath- letic Club for a contest between John L Sullivan and Peter Jackson, John W Barnett. Sullivan's manager, said yes terday: "Sullivan will accept the offe on t-.vo conditions: First, the purse must not be divided: the winne must take all of the money. Second, Sullivan must have a side bet of at least S20.000 and not rjzore than Sul- livan will forward his answer to the Cal- ifornia Athletic Club early nest week. Ravages of a Terrific Storm. GATXESVILLE, Tex., April ter- rific storm of rain and hail struck this city Thursday night, deluging the streets to tbe depth of three feet and destroying over worth of proper- ty. Tfce cloud burst was preceded by a four hours' rain, accompanied by thun- der and lightning. A croek which flows through the center of tto town rose up and swept away forty dwellings, but tho whole city caaic to the rescue and only one life was lost. I Happenings In Told to Our Keadera. ARRESTED FOR FORGERY. Living te t ot mm Dtt THE LEGISLATURE. Both of Iron X. Y.. April aiaa wbo is V> by electricity aoxt wwk. shows no ir: in truth ho SWCKK to with an air of abaadoa hiaa to a of aot. allow Lira- aad "iiOnittz or t Ja iailj a iTror that svrjrtisi V all T< the trustees of UM Soldiers' an< Orphuta' Home to contract for supply; to authorize the village of Brooklya Cuyahoga County, to borrow fcfc.OOO for tbe pur ?oae or building school houses; to authorize auj in County to issue bondi or the purpose of repairing roads damaged bj loods; to authoriz? Carrollton, Carroll County, to issue bonds for general improvements; U the oonatructioa of turnpike ii Holmes County; making It a misdemeanor to pass through a private gate or bars to avoid toll; for the relief of Jason Wheeler, prl- of Company A, Eighteenth Beeiment, O, G.; to authorize the trustees of Washington township. Defiance County, to Issue and sell bonds to drill for natural gas; to authorize village of Bowling Green, Wood County, to sel! 'ts natural gas plant and make contracts fulfillment of existing giving tb< commissioners ot Cuyahoga County authority tc order the removal ot nuisances from waterways or highways, and making a person violating the iaw against nuisances liable to fine fromflOto ISO and imprisonment in default of payment oi Ine. Senate reconsidered and postponed tc (he third Wednesday in January the Australian Qallot bilL Governor Campbell sent the follow ing nominations to the Senate: Thomas B. Paiton, of Hamilton County, trustee of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Home: Samuel D. Houpt, of Hancock County; G. P. Campbell, ol Pulton, and A. Borman, of Putnam, trustees o! the Toledo Insane Asylum; F. P. Magoe. ol Vlntou County, trustee of the Athens Insane Asylum. The committee of conference on Geyer school book bill reported, favoring thi dropping of several unimportant Senate amend ments and a change of the maximum price o. school books from seventy-five to eighty pei cent, of the present lowest wholesale price The Senate adopted this report. roombers entered lato the bus! ness of to-day's session with but little spirit The first business was a motion by Mr. Bell vllle to reconsider the vote by which Mr. Oren'i Senate bill appropriating to purchase an< preserve the pre-hlstoric Fort Ancient in War ren County was passed The motion was lost and Mr. Munson, of Licking, who had visiteO the ancient works, created a diversion by pre senttng Speaker Hysell, Chief Clerk Fisher. Representatives Pslmer and Braman witi hickory canes that be had cut on the ground Mr. Palmer, the blind member from Cuynhoga acknowledged the gift in a happy speech, com pltmenting the gentleman from Licking. Tb< House passed Senator Soncrant'g bill to refund to the fishermen ot Lake Erie and the reser voirs the sum of collected under th< Poorman 'aw levying a special tax on the of fishermen. The law tjfvs been declared un constitutional, and, as many of the flshetmei did not pay the tax. it was decided to refund t< those who Compiled promptly. Mr. Crltehfleld'i bill authorizing the Council of Mt Vernon ti issue in 'bonds to encourage manufatur ing was passed. Senate joint resolution pro vidlng for adjournment of tno Legislature 01 Monday, April 28. at eleven a. m., to convene Tuesday, January 6, 1891, wns adopted. Th< house this afternoon passed the Isvst of the ap propriatlon bills, beiug a soecial act makini special and additional appropriations as tol lows: Salary of Canal Ltkbor Commissioner...................... 9V MIno Inspector............................ Ill Adjutant General, inspection.............. 501 Soldiers' Orphans' Horns.................. 301 Printing Geological Reports..............' S.TCX Howe's History........................... fyOD  indict Frank Smith. causing of Itelle at MSaro. last Friday, hr icaad SAJLEM, Man., April George B. Ives, ex-Afcsistant District Attorney, was on Fridajr morning on a of The amount involved is said to be and the names forged were those of Solomon Lincoln and B. F. Fattens. Tbe complaint is made by the First National Bank of Salem, which beld f of the paper. Tbe rest aeld by the Salem National Bank; Asi- atic National, of Salem, and the Na- tional Bank of Marblehead. Ives is said to have used up his wife's estate of about and that of Jona- than Barney, for which he was trustee, mounting to The money, he says, was spent in extravagant living. Ives was immediately arrested and shortly afterward arraigned before Judge Safford. He pleaded guilty and was held for the Superior Court' Bail was fixed at in each case, but the prisoner declined to make any effort to procure bonds and was taken to jail. THOMPSONJVAS LEFT. How Candidate for M Pennsylvania Was Defeated by Kne- mlei. McKKEsroitT, Pa., April 26. Pres- ident has withdrawn from the Senate the appointment of Captain W. E. Thomp- son to be postmaster at MeKeesport. The appointment was made three months afro on recommendations of Con- gressman Kay. Immediately Thomp- son's enemies filed complaint with the Postmaster General that Captain Thomp- son played poker, drank whisky and used profane language. Mr. Wana- maker promptly had the nomination "hung up" in the Senate. Thompson, who is an ex-member of the Legislature and an officer of the National Guard, bombarded the department with all the recommendations ho could secure, but to no purpose. Mr. Ray was asked to name another man and refused. Thurs- day the President withdrew the nomi- nation, and a Democrat continues to handle the mails. Reward Offered for an Absconding Bank Teller. WOBCESTEU, Mass., April The first publication of the.list of bonds stolen by Frederick Kimball, tbe fugi- tive teller ot he People's Savings bank, has been made in a circular which has been sent to the United States consuls and detective -agencies all over the world. It shows that the market value of the bonds stolen was to which must be added S3.400 taken in cash. The circular otters reward for the ap- prehension of Kimball and his female companion. Held for Theft and Forgery. CONCORD, N. H., April Before' United States Commissioner Foster, Arthur D Towne, an employe of the Londonderry post-office, was held Thurs- day in on the charge of abstract- ing a letter from the mail, and in for the alleged forgery of the name of Louisa J. Woodbury on the back of_ a chock for pension money and passing the same. N. Smith was also held in for alleged forgery of Towne's name on the same check. It Invited Retaliation. OTTAWA, On t., April Tho Monetary Times, of Toronto, a leading commer- cial paper, condemns the Dominion gov- ernment for placing duties on agricul- tural products, and says such action in- vited retaliation on the part of the United States. The American proposal to put duties on such products had" not become a law when the Canadian duties were imposed, and reciprocity in this class of products might have been ar- ranged with benefit to both countries. A Dlstlnjralahen C'oropmy. WASHINGTON, April 25. A large com- pany of invited guests left Washington last evening for Pittsburgh to attend tbe dinner to be given there this even- ing by the Americns Club. Speake; Reed. Senator Quay. General Clarkson. Colonel Swords and others made up party. _ Itroke Into the froiaueo SA.X DIEGO. Cal.. April Coone and a posse of ten constables have been patrolliir the froatisr to prevent Chinamen from crossing the line from Lower California- Several wore frustrated, but at dawn Friday Mongoliar.5 maJv rush, forded tbt-Tia Juana rirer and s-.attcrcd for the hills. A Special Klretion. Loo AN- O.. April -JO.-At a special election held Thursday 10 bond our citj for JO.OOD to bore for nat-Jral ffas. so jTTaai LJjrbt the to lifffct our citr larrer majority than wrc lorwer. ST. J'Ari. Xann... A !wrva.nt firl Strotmau ia Si. St4.aCi.ri. :r. v -i tif'Cra -f   

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