Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: April 25, 1890 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Salem Daily News

Location: Salem, Ohio

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - April 25, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SALEM DAILY NEWS. SALEM. OHIO, FRIDAY. APRIL 25. 1890. TWO CENTS. CONGRESSIONAL. THOUSANDS HOM Work- Out. f JgaitUc Contest It olnts. April itice given by tb unt is being done. >ng the men yes- Iding- bosses would led general strike of business on Sat- s move the bosses i the defensive to a North Side brick n end. The men, demand that the bricks shall consti- ve practically won he yards havo re- priotors conceding April con- lled to consider the n Pacific trainmen J nearly all of the t Cheyenne. The nined, and if some ;hed soon a strike the Denver, Texas n Short Line, Kan- Pacific. 1 carpen- ill probably strike Sracting carpenters' nesday evening-and on it was decided ht-honr day. The rise, as it was gen- at the association of the men. April de- it trades unions for to day on by the the union carpen- of per day has 25.- -Yesterday aced seventy a band of rilJe. near here. aad protracted tben attempted to who was aVwpiajf hat a then Afrit tbA revenue marine cutlet Treasury Department to the Navy Oenartavmt was takes tip. Feadtef eoa federation, of the bill Mr. Hoar reported tram Committee Privileges aad Election, a MM to amend the Federal election laws of the United states. of the committee, Bald tae mil was opposed by every Democratic mem- and spoke in opposition to It- Hoar spoke in support of the bill. Mr Sherman then took the floor in opposition to revenue cutter transfer bill, denouncing It as a bribe to every officer in the revenue ma nne service because it increased their oompen- ja'lon. and placed mnnv of them on the retired list. Th'; Land Forfeiture bill was taken up as unfinished business, and was discussed for some rane; but without action went over. After a abort executive session the Senate adjourned. Cummings moved to increase the of House cloik room" luen from WOO to per year, and this led to a long dis- cussion of the labor quest on. When the clause in the tegislathe, Executive and Judicial Ap- propriation bill appropriating salaries for the Cml Service Commission was reached Mr. Cummings made the po jit. of order that it was hot properly in the bill. The commission was neither legislative, executive or jud'cial. Mr Butterworth cal'ed attention to the fact that the title of the bill included words "and tor other purposes Mr Cummmqs renl'ert 1h't commission was for no purpose at al! It should be named the great b-jpcrvlsory commission of the Gov- ernment and tin ned loose uoon the land. Its usurpations were cening to be monstrous. It bad been a scandal to the Government In- stead of eonfln'ngitvlf to t e stmpla dut'esas Indicated by iaw. it c 'me bef ire Congress m the bill as a I'Kislative executive or judicial insti- tution. The of some of these com- missioners had been Uwgel> displayed. What they lacked m intelliganc" ind experience they male up in arrogarc Th-> i science of office was never better exemplified. Mr. Cummlngs' point of oider was overruled. Mr. Dorsey, of Nebraska moved to reduce the number of commissioners from three to one. Mr Spinola, of New York, denounced the Civil Service law as an infamous imposition on the people and a complete humbug in conflict with every principle upon which the Govern- ment was founded. Mr. Dorscy's amendment was ruled out. Mr. Houk. of Tennessee, moved to strike out the entire civil service clause. A long discussion ensued, the motion to strike out was lost and the House adjourned. ON THE DIAMOND. One Among the Leadlnc Bane NEW YORK, April are the scores of yesterday's games: 1TATIONAT- LEAGUE. At York 0, Boston. 9. At game postponed At game At Cleveland-Chicago-Cleveland game PI.ATKRS1 LKAGTJK. At 15, Buffalo 18. At New At At 3, Boston 7. AMERICAN" ASSOCIATION. At St. 5, St Lonis 6. All other games JRUN DOWV LAST. FrigfctftU Results Fin Silk Factory. Six Men FaUUy Injured and ber Badiv Hnrt "Sltovers of the Queer Arrested After a Long Exciting Search by Detec- CHICAGO, April important ar- rest of counterfeiters was made here yesterday. For months the country has been fioodel with silver certificates said to have been issued by the German National Bank of New Orleans, but which were plainly bogus. The "shovers'" of these bills have baffled the secret service men in every city. A couple of policemen saw two men going from saloon to saloon on the South Side and arrested them on sus- picion. They gave their names as Rob- ert Thompson and William Furber. OVer S200 in the above mentioned coun- terfeit bills were found on their persons. Conference of Republican Called. WASHINGTON, April call will be issued to-day for a meeting of the members of the executive committee ol the Republican National Committee, tc be held here on Wednesday next Sena- tor Quay. General Clarkson, General Dudley. M- H. De Young and the other members of the executive committee will be here on that date to talk over party matters and outline plans for fu- ture party action. Fna4 KUer. TOUEUO. O-. April body of William Hoffman found Thursday morning floating in the Mautncc rivet trear tbe Grange street wharf. Holt- nftf formerly worked for tbe Toledc Transfer Company, and disappeared about three ago. This Uttrt tot that has been of hit whethet suicide 01 of Caogfat the tTafortaui railing CATASAUQXJA, Pa., April 35. large new building of the Unicorn Silk Manufacturing Company, at this place, was discovered to be on fire at six o'clock Thursday morning. The alarm quickly sounded, but, owintr to the heur, the fire companies, which are composed of volunteer workmen from the differ- ent furnaces, factories and mills, were under the impression that the whistles were merely calling them to their daily labors and did not respond until the fire had a headway of about twenty minutes. Upon the arrival of the fire engines at the scene there was another delay in procuring a sufficient supply of water. By the time the firemen had succeeded in obtaining-sufficient-power to throw streams on the burning structure it was one mass of flames. _ The heat was intense, but notwith- standing this the firemen worked like beavers in the hope of saving the store rooms and engine house. While busily engaged in their efforts to check the flames an explosion of some vitriol and other acids stored on the premises took place. The concussion shook the ground and shattered the building. Before the firemen could retreat several of their number were caught by the falling walls and many others were injured by the1 flying debris. The firemen directed several streams upon that part of the burning ruins under which their com- panions lay buried and the work of res- sue was at once begun. The following persons were taken out: John aged twenty-seven, srushed to death; Joseph Lodigina, an Italian, crushed to death; Ulysses G. Everett, aged eighteen, fatally injured; George Pfaff, fatally injured, Michael Moran, internally injured, can not live; Jharles Frick, skull fractured and ter- ibly burned, will die; William Price, lead cut; William F. Stermacher, leg iroken And badly burned; Thomas burned and hit with fly- ng about the head and body; George Fehnel, slightly injured" ibout the head; Peter Dorhammer, cut ibout the head and body by flying glass ind other debris. Many persons, spectators and others, were injured slightly by flying debris. The fire is supposed to have been caused by spontaneous combustion in one of ;he packing rooms. At eleven o'clock ;he fire was under control. The total loss is placed at divided as fol- ows: Buildings, machinery, stock, partly insured. MS OF TBE STATE. from Arwav. X- April Tbf   OTTAW Out- commit- tee wjiica has been inwwtijrattajr :be atfpro- to bis Kiel In Stnate. April Seaate consumed most of the day In discussing theGeyer school book bill, which passed by a vote ol 31 to 3. The bill provides as follows: {The State School Commis- sioner shall within thirty days secure copies of all the school books now in use in the State, with information as to toeircost at wholesale and retail. The Governor. School Commissioner and Supervisor of Public Printing constituting the school book board, sball then examine care- fully the books and, aTer a toorough inveatlga- Uon of the subject wolrn sixty days, fix a maximum price for all grades of school books, whloh shall in no Instance exceed seventy-five per cent, of the present lowest wholesale price, After this is done the School Commissioner Shall invite bids from publishers to furnish all the school books useci in the State during a period of five years, tte contract price to be limited within the maximum set by the school book board, and the school book board, if tbe proposals are of the right kind, shall accept the lowest and best and require a bond for the performance by publishers of the contract. The boards of education through- out the State must then be notified of the a ctlon of the school book board and shall then elect the courses of study and the books nee'erf. The publishers will furnish books directly to the school boards, the latter paying the cost of transports on and paying for the books out of the contingent fund. Each board sha'l then ar- range for the sale, through agents or lotal deal- ers of the books to the school children, the cost to the children in no case being permitted to ex- ceed tbe contract price and ten per cent. The bill was afterward reconsidered and amended sc as to provide for the appointment by the Gov- ernor, from the two leading political parties, of an educator and a business man to act on the school book board. As amended the bill passed. Governor Campbell sent tc the Senate the fol- lowing nominations: W. H. Kinder, of Han- cock County, Commissioner of Insurance tor three years beginning June 1800; Oaaiel Wolf, of Hamilton County: trustee of the Boys' Indus- trial School; Charles Roose, of Ottawa County, trustee of the Blind Asylum, vice John H. Hud- son. The Senate defeated Mr. House bill to abolish registration except in Cincinnati, Cleveland. Columbus, Toledo, Dayton, Sprirg- neld and Yonngstown. A resolution was adopted to adjourn at eleven a. m. Monday. The following bills were passed: To repeal as act to require the commissioners of Van Wert County to give all county work belonging to his department to the county surveyor; making appropriations for the salary and expenses of the Can al Commissioners and other expenses; to authorize Buoyrus, Crawford County, to Issue bondi for building purposes; to authorize Defiance to issue bonds for the purpose of constructing sewere; to authorize Marietta to issue bonds for the purpose of con- structing sewers; re enacting the old law with regard to election officers in clt e-j and villages not having election boards and In townships; providing for the appointment of an additional clerk of the Supreme Court. The Senate re- fused to concur in the House amendments to the bill to legislate Railroad Commissioner Cap- peller out of office. was great confusion In the House this morning and the Speaker ordered the sergeant at-arms to clear the lobby of all persons, except ladles, not entitled to the.privt- leges of the floor. Mr. Gear moved a reconsid- eration of the vote by which to leipslate Railroad Commissioner Cappeller out of office was lost Without debate the previous ques- tion called and the bill was passed The vote by which the bill to create a Board of .Put- lie Affairs for Toledo lost, was reconsid- ered and a message sent to the Ssnate asking for Its return Mr. Price Introduced a bill amending Section 11 of the Dow law, Which pro- vides for a fine and punishment lor violating the act. The amendment changes the word "and to leaving It   of making and passing counterfeit money. The Sigsby s are the last of the. infamous Joe Bennefleld band of coun- terfeiters and outlaws, who operated-Ih. Georgia, Tennessee and Alabama. Joe- Bennefleld is now serving a long term in prison and several members' 9! the old gang are dead. The moulds used by the Sigsbys were captured, together with several hundred dollars of spurious coin. _______________ Sllok Scheme of n Afoomhluer. NASHVILLE, Tenn.. April the cases disposed of by Judge Jackson Wednesday was that of Jake Short He was arrested in the act of running s, 'still. His, house and still were about 150 yards apart, and one Was on Tennessee side and the other on the Kentucky side. 'Expert testimony con'4 not testify as to which was in Tennes- see. Short entered a plea of guilty, but was cleared because it was not posi- tively proved that His still was nessee. lie will be taken to Kentucky for trial. _______________ Raided by ST. Loxns, April from the Chickasaw Nation say that a large band of White Caps raided a wide section of the southern part of the reservation Wednesday night, whipped a number of men and gave them notice to quit the nation in five days. A number of other persons, who were not notified to leave in ten days. A good deal of excitement exists in the section raided, and a number of people are pre- paring to move into Texas. Incendiary Fire In a Hotel. CHICAGO, April fire, supposed to be of incendiary origin, that started in the office of a physician located fn Kuhn's Hotel early Thursday morn caused a slight panic among 'the guests. The night clerk aroused every one in tbe) house and they turned out thinly clad and remained on the street until the firemen quenched the blaze. Chief Swenie says his men found a pile of pa- per ablaze in a corner of the office, sad he believes tbe fire was started for purpose of destroying the building. Sold the WhMrr Trwrr. ST. PAT-I. Minn.. April St Paul stockholders of tbe South St PM! Distilling Company have sold tbeir stock, amounting to aad too bonds tbey held, amocatiofr to flOt.OM, to representatives of tbe whisky trust Tbe trust boand iteelf to keep tbe dis- tillery in operation here for twoyosrs, it will clow. Meanwhile dis- tillery will be ran to two-tbirds its capacity.______________ GrrninE. I. T.. April in were bnrmcbt tbe ftmal pmirrsV- of Ux- bill was IVirr I- rifffctl ia aad the Amoraiiaia omsnaiifcn aresstt- Uw. TtOoV y y_ Air-i. ii -TV- s- ijfk m   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication