Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - April 10, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SALEM DAILY NEWS. NO. 85. Quartette 01 he Hangman in SALEM. OHIO, THURSDAY, APRIL 10. 1890. TWO CENTS Carter, Pay of Their Bar- l here Wednesday >r which Bartholo- 3 the cold-blooded .aron W. Dilliard, after having led preparations were .artholomew mak- drs. Dilliard. At isten to him, but sr to play her part On the night pre- went le he was absent, Dilliard, the of his victim, on and Mrs. Dilliard ils. Bartholomew I removed the pin in the cartridge thus making the >mew was to come >y disturbing the cackle. This waa Mrs. Dilliard to II him that some he hen roost, and death. She was nd also a lantern, go towards a cer- beside the road, and if there. Bartholo- 1 the tree and he d out to the let- led with shot and fight he died be- 0 the house, to- Bartholomew has- raorning went to told of the mur- prise. Mrs. Dill- d sent her son to The neighbors Id be done, ectives led to the rs. Mrs. Dilliard e and her testi- thers, caused tbe jmew and herself, muted to impris- e is now confined Philadelphia. Lpril >f John Matthews, nty jail here yes- met his death 3 scaffold with a no speech and his ,he fall. Carter years of age, a Va., and a good id a very bad rep- 1 a family of crim- esse Carter, was r County several uurder of a man icr brother is now penitentiary for sburgh two years ihich Carter was in November, i tbe house of John Roberts was man. and bis resi- disreputable char- victim. Matthnws, ih Emma Dunn, a a frequent vis- >uso. Carter and about tbe girL i "rough the breast subsequently S while trying to ftntof the State. April 1 firmly upon tho to last. Jn innocent: be r "v. Tavlo; liscovered the body of the lady lying face downward in the highway lalf a mile from her home. She had jeen shot to death. Clara was returning Home from visiting a neighboring family. Andrews was seen following ;he girl until she entered a dense woods through which the public road ran AH the evidence during the trial waa cir- cumstantial. After convict! on Andrews voluntarily confessed his Eruilt. INDICTED FOH MUAiDER. True BUI a Georgian Klllfrd Assassin. AUGUSTA, Ga., April grand jnry at Warrenton yesterday found a true bill against Charles E. McGregor for the murder of J. M. Cody at that place in October, 1889. The case is a notable one. McGregor was fired at from ambush on the night of December 23, 1887. Tbe shooting was wrapped in mystery for some time. Finally a negro was charged with the shooting, when Cody came forward and confessed to It Conflicting rumors assign various causes for the crime. Fifteen months later Cody was indicted for assault with in- tent to murder McGregor. At the Oc- tober term of court last year Cody failed to appear and search for him was un- availing. The day after the adjourn- ment of coxirt Cody appeared on the streets of Warrenton and McGregor fired three shots into Cody, killing him, instantly. _______________ FOOD FOR FLAMES. Largest Manufacturing Establishment In thti South S2OO.OOO. DECATUP., Ala., April the United States Rolling Stock Company's shops here except the wood department burned last evening. The loss consti- tutes more than one-half the property belonging to the company at this place. Four hundred men will be thrown out of employment, besides tho loss of more than to the company. About fifty box cars just completed were burned. The building as a whole was the largest in the South and employed, in- cluding the clerical force, nearly five hundred men. The insurance could not be ascertained. Tbe fire was accidental. SWINDLED EVERYBODY. An Absconding; Politician Proves to Have, Been a Great Rascal. Pa., April 10. An official statement made yesterday sKows sixty claims aggregating in sums ranging from S100 to SS.OOO against the absconding lawyer and politician, J. Monroe Shellenberger. His father puts in the claim. Cases of swindling by Sbellenberger continue to be reported from country merchants, farmers and others and the liabilities will probably amount to a much larger sum than that above mentioned. It is stated that the estates of Phellenberger's wife, children and other'relatives have suffered heavy losses. The assets aro meagre. Striking; Carpenters Confident of Winning. CHICAGO, April striking car- penters are gaining ground and feel confident that the bosses will be com- pelled to yield two points to them with- in a few days. The first point will be the recognition of the Union and second an advance in wages. The two concessions will be necessary before the strike can be declared off. The carpen- ters have placed their affairs in tho bands of an arbitration committee, which has power to adjust tbe existing differences, and until the bosses recog- nize this committee, which they have so far refused to do. there can be no set- tlement. ________________ Gale on Lake Hnron. GoDEKicn. Ont. April heavy gale from the northwest set in at noon Wednesday and increased in violence towards evening, lashing the waters of Lake Huron into powerful breakers. The fishing fleet which left here for tbo fishing grounds had a hard time of it and lost all of the boats before tbo ves- sels were safely anchored. The Parisian, a freight schooner owned by Mr. D- Matheson. and wanned by bis three sons, is missinj and it is feared tbe boat has been lost with all on Itoard. TmriflT Itill Krm.Ar tor April Mr. ley has bis report on tariff bill and iriJl prevat it to Wars and Comsiittee to-day. Mr. rlisle is s-usy minority report and 5f bo :t to UK- full J'iil Friday Saturday. A OF A CHUNK. Summit County, Ohio, Visited by a Hurricane. Every Thine in Its Path for Mild Demolished and Number of Fatalities. Farm Buildings. and Stock Utterly Destroyed by the Wild Rush of tho Ele- ments. AKBOX, O., April first torna- do ever known in this county struck Springfield township Tuesday night The storm moved from northeast to southwest, in a path ten rods wide, ut- terly demolishing everything it met. It first struck the house of A. H. Jones, just west of Springfield Lake, doing slight damage. Eighty rods from Jones' house was the two-story house of Scott Sweitzer and five barns and sheds. The storm demolished every building, leav- ing not a timber standing. The debris la now scattered over a ten-acre lot. Mr. wife and two children were thrown into the cellar when the house went down, and escaped injury. The demolition is complete, nothing but the cellars showing where the buildings were. His loss of crops and farm imple- ments is very heavy. The cyclone struck Sharon township and mowed a swath twenty rods wide and six miles long directly towards Ak- ron, but arose above the surface far enough to pass harmless over this city. Six miles east of Akron it again struck the earth and thenoe continued its course southeast for several miles with, unabated fury. In Sharon township the farm buildings, crops and stock of Uriah Woerstler, Richard Brown.Isaac Brown, Frank Lacroix, George W. Crane, Abra- ham Lytle, Henry Chandler, Chris F. Wall, Reese Wall, Matthew Bramley, Frank Bramley, Hughes Frank and Henry Wall were destroyed is ten minutes. Immediately after the cyclone passed searching parties were organized. The body of Hughes Frank was found forty rods from the site where his house had stood. Mrs. Frank was found 120 rods further on, so badly injured that she can not live. Matthew Bramley was caught by falling timbers and fatally hurt. Frank Bramley's house was blown from its foundation and he was buried in the wreck, which took fire from the cook stove. A hired man res- cued Bremley. The wreck was entirely consumed. Richard Brown was blown, a quarter of a mile and left againsj; a stump, where he was fouad unconscious and badly hurt. Bank Cashier Skips With FOSSTOX, Minn.. April 10. G. Tweeton, cashier of the Fosston Nation- al Bank, has absconded with of the bank's funds and is undoubtedly safe in British territory." He has been traced as far as Fargo, where he bought a ticket for Victoria. A singular entry in Tweeton's books attracted the atten- tion of the bank officials and, learning of the investigation that was to follow, he decamped at once. His sureties are quite wealthy and the bank will lose nothing. Vine Mariners Kescnert from an Inland. PniT.ADEi.riMA, April steam- ship Cuba at this port from Bluefields has brought tbe captain and eight of tbe crew of the bark Hcrnasand, from Port Natal for Progresso. Tbe bark struck on Moront Key. March 2, and became a total loss. The Hernasand's crew reached a neighboring island by means of a raft. Tbey were nearly starved when tbe Cuba was sighted and an- swered their of distress. Fell Hmillnne to llrr Dtrrr.oiT. Mich.. April number of girls employed in John Davis ,fc Co.'s laboratory were playinjr with the ele- vator on the- third floor daring tbe noon hour yesterday when Annie Caplis. eijrhtwn years of ajc. was caught :n tbe s and thrown headlong through tbe T to a F1FTY-FIKST CONGRESS. In and A WASHINGTON, April Wil- son, of Iowa, offered a resolution yesterday, which wan agreed to.ingtructing the Committee on InMr-SUte Commerce to Inquire what addi- tional legislation necessary in respect to commutation and excursion tickets, so as to prevent abuses now existing. The Howe bill appropriating to Sup- ply the deficiency occasioned by the in the office of the late sergeaat-at-arms of the Bouae was passed. Tbe Senate then resumed consideration of the Montana contested election case and Mr. Pugh continued his argument In favor of the Democratic Clark and Maginnls. Mr. Turpte made an extended argument la which he defended the right of aliens to vote in Montana. Hie Montana case was then laid aside and Mr. Hale called up the Chinese Cen- sus Enumeration bill. Mr. Hearst said that his idea and notion of legislation on the subject was the passage of b law that would exclude Chinese from coming to the country after a cer- tain date, but mould treat the Chinese already here fairly. The bill was further discussed by Messrs. Stewart, Dolpn, Hale, Dawes and others, but without action the Senate ad- journed. Senate amendment to the House Mil providing for town site entries of land In Oklahoma wag non-concurred in. The Speaker having laid before the House the Senate bill for the Improvement and maintenance of the Na- tions! Zoological Park with a House amend- ment providing that the District of Columbia shall pay half the expense, Mr. McComas moved that the House recede from Its amendment. A lengthened debate ensued. Mr. McComaa' mo- tion was finally defeated, the House insisted on the amendment and a conference ordered. The House then went into Committee of the Whole the Naval Appropriation bill. Mr. Wilkinson, of Louisiana, advocated the estab- lishment of a navy yard at Algiers, La. Mr. Lodge said the matter of establishing a navy yard on the Gulf of Mexico was under consider- ation in tbe committee. The claims of Algiers, Pensacola, Port Royal and other places were presented and, without coming to a conclusion, the committee rose and the House adjourned. OUT AT A LOSS. English In Detroit Breweries from the Business After an Pn- protttikble .Experience. DJETAOIT, English syndicate headed by Seaton Karr, of Liverpool, a year ago bought out the Detroit brewing establishments of A. Jacob Mann, Anton Miehen- felder and Charles Endross, paying 000 therefor. Negotiations were pro- longed on the refusal of the Detroiters to take their share of the securities, but the Englishmen were so persistent that they finally paid cash to two brewers. The business failed to bear out the audit and the prospectus and yesterday the English holders sold out the four breweries to a Detroit syndicate com- posed of the local directors of the con- cern and the original owners. The English investors sell oui at a heavy loss, the loss being sufficient, it is reported, to make the investment in the common stock of the English cor- poration a total loss. Alleged Murderer's Corpse Found In s Well. FAULKTOX, S. D., April was rtceived'feere yesterday-that the body of Echardt. the reported would-be mur- derer of his family, was found in a well on a neighbor's farm about two miles south of the scene Of the tragedy. The sheriff, coroner and a large number of citizens have gone to Freeman's place, where the body was found, for an inves- tigation. It is thought the family of the dead man will be taken into custody at once, as there is good reason to be- lieve they killed him and manufactured the story of his attack on them and sub- sequent flight. Tornndo Four Deaths. ROAXOKE, Va.. April great- est tornado for many years passed over this city last evening. The cast bouse at tbe Crozicr iron furnace was blown down and three laborers killed and one mortally wounded. Loss to the furnace company. Nearly 100 dwellings in course of erection were completely demolished. The Salem furnace was blown down and a heavy loss is re- ported, in that vicinity were reduced to ruins. The loss in tbe city and neighborhood is SI 0.000. SWEPT UY A HUKKICAJTE.! af UT r ST. Mich.. April Afte Totn's Cabin T St, ati and la a April A raia jly jirinrsjiailj Trmlo Ditched. N. D.. April 10. The scrond section of the Northern Pacific wesjbf.cund overland passenjrer train struck a rail alniut fifteen miles of bore morning. The section first clas< The and cars :nc rail, deraiUii. The burl. and Nobody Items of News from Obio Citiet and Towns. THE LAW-MAKERS. la Both Branches of Oeneral Assembly. Stnotr, April was a surprise In Senate to-dar when Dr. Stephens and Mr. Bowells voted against, and. with the Repub- lican Senators, defeated Mr. Schulte's bill to create a non-partisan police commission foi Cincinnati. passed the Senate as follows: To authorize the board of education of West Unity, Williams County, to issue bonds and re pair and beat school buildings; to authorise City Council of Bucyrus to make a special levy for the purpose of paying the city's portion of street Improvement bonds; for the relief of Ra- chel Wyman.widow of Louis T. lieu- tenant m Company E, Second Regiment, O.N.6. bill of Mr. Benfer reducing the legal rate of interest from six to five per cent, and from eight to six per cent, on contract elicited considerable discussion this morning. The proposition was supported by most of the rural members on the ground that the farming community, because of short crops nnd conse- quent heavy mortgages, needed relief in this direction. The opposition irom the city mem- bers was bnsed on the ground that interest, like other maters, is regulated by supply and de- mand, and they held that the lender would get such interest as circumstances compelled bor- rowers to pay, and to this extent it would be an inducement to evade the law. The bill wax finally defeated. Bills passed: Amending the compulsory education law so us to provide that children shall be started to school the first four weeks of the school year; that all youth of school age living apart from their parents shall be entitled to free schooling, and making mand- atory on boards of education to furnish books to pupils of indigent parents; to so amend the law of February 2i, 1899, that county commissioners may fence, care for and improve abandoned burial grounds inside corporate limits; appro- priating to pay deficiencies. Mr. Mal- lon's joint resolution to provide for a joint com- mittee consisting of four Representatives and three Senators, whose duty it shall be to pre- pare a uniform system of municipal govern- ment for the cities of the State, came up. It was amended in committee so as to provide that the commission should not travel be- yond the borders of the State, un- less the members bear their own expenses. Mr. Pudney. author of the first resolution on the subject, which provided that the Governor ap- point a commission, was ready to join with Mr. Mallon in a movement that will result in stopping the interminable ripping up of the municipal governments of the Strte. Mr. Bra- man offered an amendment providing for a non- partisan commission consisting of four persons, to be appointed by the Governor and Secretary of State. Speaker Hysell took the lloor and made a stiring argument in favor of the amend- ment and resolution. Mr. Hodge spoke in favor of the resolution, it-the most im- portant question that had come before the Leg- islature, und Mr. Geyer followed in the same strain. Messrs. Green, of Cuyuhoga; Nolaii, of Hamilton: Belville, of Montgomery, and Heft- Her. of Franklin. eTpressed doubt as to the ability of any commission to prepare a uniform system of government. An amendment was offered by Air. Belville to strike out the Secre- tary of State and leave the appointing power with, the Governor. THE STORM'S RAVAGES. r. VBC av "t t. a-fx: T. Details of the Tornado's Work in Ohio Towns Widespread Destruction of Property. ALLIANCE, O., April 10. A cyclone in a direct east and west line struck this city Tuesday nigbt. It had a whirling motion and a path about 100 feet wide. It passed through the north portion of town, leveled all chimneys, twisted off large shade trees, broke numberless panes of glass, lifted bodily out-build- ings and several barns and stables. It also destroyed several large greenhouses owned by wholesale florists, unroofed freight cars, destroyed telephone com- munication and partially the telegraph service. The gas works were wrecked. NOKWAI.K, O., April The destruc- tive sweep of Tuesday evening's cyclone was felt in the surrounding country, and reports coming in tell of great damage. Society Belle Elopes With a Negro. CRESTLIXK. O.. April Miss Camp- bell, the only daughter of steward O. H. Campbell, of the Continental Hotel, left home last week and was supposed to have gone to Berea to visit frierjls. Tho next day after her departure one of tho hotel waiters, a colored man. was also missed and it is now known tbat they both went to Cleveland and were mar- ried. Miss Campbt-ll was one of the leaders of Crestlinc's best society. Her parents are well nijjh crazed with griel over the sad and sensational aiTair. Fight the KrdUtrictlnK Plan. O.. April The Re- publican City Council has passed a res- olution appropriating: ?400 to retain Hon. It. A. Harrison, of Columbus, and Hon. S. A. liowman. of this city, to institute and prosecute to annul tbe redistri'-tinj- of tb.- ciir wards by the by tbe mayor, and flection of all ward officers in tbe by said with- Highland Park. III., from One at the Wont Ever Known in that Section. HIGHLAND PARK. 111., April 1 fiercest storms ever known in llinois swept over this place Tuesday night and did heavy damage to property. _ Though only one person was injured, a number had narrow escapes. Tbe wind :ame from the northwest and the path of destruction was about halt mile' wide. The Catholic church, a large. structure, gave way before the blast1 fell into a shapeless mass. Tho houses of Mr. Rafferty and Martin Blet- tel, which adjoined the church on the west, were next blown over, their occu- pants fortunately escaping in their night clothes without injury. The roof was lilted off Mrs. large residence and hurled into the lot and dashed into splinters. The resi- dence occupied by S. Stocker and his family was unroofed and otherwise dam- aged. Mr. Kretter's residence suffered similar damage, and an old lady in the house was seriously hurt by a large piece of wood which struck her in the side. Pitt's blacksmith shop, a large frame structure, was picked up by the wind, carried twenty feet and torn to'i pieces. The roof was blown off the large grocery store of Thomas Evans. The building was badly shattered and serious damage was done to his Stock. The front of Goldberg's store was blown in and the stock scattered in all direc- tions. The Central Hotel lost nearly all its blinds and was otherwise damaged. The front of Mrs. Kenny's store was crushed in by the wind, and a large portion of her stock was ruined. Out-buildings and fences all over the place were blown down, trees were prostrated and the town was shaken up generally. The damage will not be much less than 000. ________________ "A MISSING LORD. The Heir to an Knrlrlom Said to Have Gone to the South African Diamond Mines In Search of Wealth. MONTREAL, April J. G. Fitzgerald, a large ranch owner of Calgary, Alberta, who is now here, says he knew Lord Boylo well and he is satisfied that Boyle is now in South Africa. Fitzgerald says that after Lord Boyle and his partner lost their money in Alberta they started to cross tbo Rocky Mountains by the Crow's Nest pass to British Columbia, intending to make their way to the South African diamond mines. Mr. Fitzgerald not believe that Lord Boyle was lost in a snowslide, or perished in a blizzard on the plains, as many think, but says he is certain he can be found in South Africa. Gigantic Land Swindle. Torr.KA, Kan., April swindle is being worked in Kansas. Men claiming to own large tracts of Texas lands have been operating in this State for the purpose of trading them for Kan- sas real estate. They have been doing a business in bogus deeds and ab- stracts, selling land which they do not own. The officials of Presidio County, Texas, have written to Topeka parties that hundreds of these fraudulent deeds aro in circulation. Several parties here have been victimized. Mysterious Disappearance. MOXTREAT., April 10. French-Cana- dian commercial circles are considera- bly aroused over tbe mysterious disap- pearance of I. A. Quintal, a highly re- spected member of the notarial profes- sion. He is believed to be in financial difficulties, but all the banks interested feel confident that every thing will come out all right. The Banque Xa- tionale and tho Villc Maro bank of Quintal's paper. Quintal is reported to be worth S100.000. Another Hank Fitllare, Four MOKGAX. CoL. April bank of Fort Morgan has made an as- signment. The assets arc placed at 540.000. with liabilities of over S20.000. There wore on deposit ?IT.OOO of county funds. There was no mom-y in the safe wben Uic assignee took Cashier IlarUett loft Fort Morgan last Thursday for IK-avcr carrenry and all that ban brca beard from him ban Iw-ca checks drawn th-nvcr banks, which not paid. out t uri'iy <-f lavi. A for April C VT. ha< wiOj IV- -tvranty wort- 5'V tSi" Akron A. Aic'-rj'-aM Ivnan and Onnpany. if- AJcno Kv.. April County with SaTurfay. TaT. Hall. wiUi the thir- of ba Tbr- u. Hall rrl aal ami xijli al i T'3l3' 14LM. a" T.2LV j SITTJI' .51 i I wO f Ir.'J t 4 1 i MTlO I I IXtav T, '1 SI l  _ r.w, .r 1f., I w-.i m K -finK 1 iMm. sT, -i -y I   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication