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Salem Daily News: Thursday, April 3, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - April 3, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SAI.EM BAILY NEWS. 79. SALEM. OHIO, THURSDAY, APRIL 3. 1890. TWO CENTS. Congressmen ject. ie Granting ol ovenunent, pose Thto Policy Adoption Would ss. Farquhar, submitted a re- PS of the majori- lee on Merchant accompany the ouse by himself Y to the House to subsidize the engaged in ce it upon an er nations. The jrioration of the merest and con- marine is neces- a naval power, i much the same formed. Great >ur richest com- n applied a cure rchants and for- of dependence he shipping of a control of the I. The adverse d by foreign ma- T- ng of our own, edit, instead ol >uld have con- of having for- ar us. We would our exports by ts and carriers, ae report says, certain of gov- of the present ar and speedy earners forming e of the navy, i of Parliament Admiralty and for fifty years d steam postal was primarily been sustained of grasping the the com- 3, submitted the inority object to that every in- jiness and every d to sustain the ing a privileged the whole peo- ve that bounties aping interests, that the most bout the revival g industry is for aterials that go af ships on tho iws in restraint our restrictive jrmit our mer- ips where they under the Amer- GAS. Death of Three Six Others. April an o 4 slope of the ipany at Nanti- en were instant- injured and two killed are James es and Anthony sly injured arc (arshall. John J. Lanskey. The >ph Noforski and ced lamp is sup- ic gas. The mine Train. ril door er closets on the road was burst .terday morning lan found on tbo iself to a hook frchicf. In his :andkerchief and in time to save found it is sup- .Schmidt, about w a ticket from t. also S33 in v nnnual report nrton Quincy A TI epitome i rt on the Urgent Defi- ciency bill was presented and agreed to Tha Senate then proceeded to the consideration ol the Montana election case the majority report being in favor of Mr Saunders and Thomas Power and the minority being in favor of Will- iam A. Clark and Martin Maginms. Mr Hoar stated case on the part of the majority of the committee. Mr. Gray (reprcse-.fug the minority of the Committee on Prmie-es .ind Elections) made a statement in support of th claim that Messrs Clark and M.xginuis are entitled to be seated Senators from Montana Mr Gray yielded the floor without concluding his argument and Mr. Evarts offered a resolution declaring that the Senate had heard with deep sens bility the an- nouncement of the death of Hon. David Wilbur, late Renresentatire from the State of New York, and concurring in tne resolution of the House of Represdut.it ves for tiie appointment of a joint select cotnm ttee to attend tha fu- neral The resolution was adopted. Senators Hiscock, Squire and Kenna were appointed the committee on the paitof the Senate and as a further mark of respect the Senate adjourned. CAUSED GREAT SURPRISE. Sensation Created by the Failure of a Firm of Mill Thou-anJ Employes Rendered Idle. PHILADELPHIA, April Bros., owners and operators of the Aston, Knowlton and West Branch mills in Aston township, Delaware County, man- ufacturing doeskins, shirtings and jeans and employing persons, made an assignment Wednesday to the Delaware County Trust Company. John Rhodes, who, since 1881, has boen practically the sole proprietor of the plant, attrib- utes the failure to general shrinkage in the value of all textile fabrics and to lack of a market for manufactured stock, of which a large amount is now stored up. The assets are largo and it is believed that if reasonable terms are made by creditors the concern oan re- sume business. Samuel Rhodes, who was bought out by John in 1881, holds judgment notes to the extent of and other judg- ments amounting to were filled prior to the assignment. The credit of the house has been of the highest grade and John Rhodes was regarded as the leading business man of the county. The failure, therefore, causes surprise. The mills and 200 dwellings of the em- ployes cover 400 acres of ground and, in fact, comprise the whole settlement of Aston. _______________ BIG CORRUPTION FUND Allegeil to Have Been Used to Defeat the Prohibition Amendment in vania. NEW YORK, April The Prohibition organ, the Voice, publishes the details of an alleged corrupt conspiracy entered into between the liquor dealers of Penn- sylvania and the leaders of both politi- cal parties of that State, by which tho prohibition amendment to the constitu- tion was defeated last fail. A fund of over is alleged to have been contributed by the liquor men, hotel proprietors, brewers, etc. This money, according to the Voice's story, was dis- tributed among leading politicians and the press of the State. being men- tioned as the amount being paid to one Philadelphia paper. The Uerald's Philadelphia correspond- ent telegraphs that he has interviewed a number of tbe proprietors of news- papers mentioned by the Voice in con- nection with the matter and they all pronounce the story false. Another Victim of Pupil Farmtnr- ST. TuoMA1-. Ont.. 3. young Englishman named James Potter has arrived here on bis way to Walker's Sta- tion to take a place as pupil farmer. Ho he a victim of a fraudulent Lon- don atrrni who secured of bis money in return for tbf position on tbe farm. Potter in his pocket and int'-ndf d to correspond with him. bat made the other arrange- ment. Four or Src others arc oa tho Many Strikes and Rumors ol More Trouble Amour the Workmen in a Number o! Trades and at Different Cities. and Y.. April The block oc- by W. A. Son. ia and C. C. Shaver. was Turllr by Sr Agitation for Shorter with Ko Ho- Auction of Pay U the of tbe turbanee. CHICAGO, April plumbers who struck are apparently slowly gaining ground. Yesterday morning several shops sent word to the secretary of the Plumbers' Union asking to have their men come back to work until present contracts were completed, the men to receive S3.75 per wages asked the job lasted, MARLBORO. Mass., April 3. The crimpers at the shoe factory of Boyd, Correy Co. have gone out on strike. Superintendent Oilman will fill their places with outside help, in which case the Knights of Labor will order all hands in the shop out The men de- mand more wages, which are refused. NEW YORK, AprU artificial stonemasons (cement workers) to the number of 175, and over 300 laborers in sympathy with them, struck yesterday for an eight-hour contract at a rate of fifty cents per hour for masons and daily wages for their laborers. There are fifty-three firms employing these workmen and over half of them have already signified their approval of the terms of the contract. PITTSBURGH, April 3 a meeting held Tuesday night the carpenters of Pittsburgh decided not to join in the eight-hour movement of the American Federation of Labor, which is to be in- augurated May l. The carpenters here- abouts number about ST. JOHN, N. B., April hun- dred and forty carpenters and black- smiths employed in the car works of J. H. Harris Co. have struck for a nine- hour day. The company say they can not compete with the Ontario establish- ments and graot the men's demands. GLOUCESTER, Mass.. April The ship painters who struck yesterday for an increase of pay have been granted the same and returned to work. WEAKENING. Rumors of the Sale of the Columbus Base Ball Club Again The Reasons Therefor. CoLU.Miics, 0., April :-5. The rumor of the sale of the Columbus base ball club to Indianapolis or Detroit is still going the rounds. The latest one is to the effect that Sunday games are to be stopped here and that no money can be made without them, and that the team has been weakened so badly by the loss of Baldwin, Orr and Daily that it is not much stronger than a minor league club and will not draw the crowds during the week that it did last year. While there is considerable talk of stopping the Sunday games nothing definite can be learned just now, but it is evident that the directors are uneasy from the fact that they are flooding the City Council and others in authority with complimentary season tickets. The club is making such a poor showing in the exhibition series that the people are becoming disgusted and it is hard to tell what the outcome will be unless it is greatly strengthened. Another Chapter in the Feud. CHARLESTON, W. Va., April 3. Infor- mation has just been received here that on Saturday night Jerry Hatfield, a cousin of "Devil'' Anss, and intimately related to the Hatflelds who have been Involved in the famous feud along the Big Sandy, was killed at Logan Court House by a man named M. C. Lee, who Is connected with the McCoys. Hatfield was shot through the body. There much excitement over this fresh out- break and it is probable there will be further trouble. Conclave of Anti-Prohibition Republicans. DES MotXKS, la., April A confer- ence of anti-prohibition Republicans was held in this city Wednesday at which about 150 delegates were present, representing twenty cities of Iowa. Tho movement is one started for the purpose of forcing the Republican party in Iowa to throw over its prohibition principles and to return to advocacy of license law. the reason being that in many of tho cities of the State the law is so openly violated that the saloons are far worse than under a license law. ImprUoneil for Intuiting MfXTKEAU April 2. Two young An- James Gibbs and Hogcrs. were arrested Tuerfay in St. Bridget's parish and sentenced to six years" imprisonment for insnitin? the French flap- Sanday there was crand proc'-ssion of Roman Catholics and a of tri-colors. A number of tb" flags left flying Gibbs aad Ilogers lore tbcsi Will PLAYERSTLEAGUE. Deserters from the Back Into MM the Mooklnr- YORK, April special meet- of the Players' Base Ball League held afthe Fifth Avenue Hotel yes- tmiay. The object of the conference wsji to discuss the ontlook for the com- ing season and to provide for the success of the Brotherhood movement. The mooting was harmonious. Tbe opening dafea were changed so that the seasons of fcpth the National League and the Players' League will open on the same dayj April 19. Tfce question of taking back deserters from the Brotherhood was settled with- out much argument. It was decided that Bed ley, Mulvey and Delehanty be re- instated. The case of John T. Picketfc, the short stop of the Philadelphia Play- ers1'ciub, whose services are claimed bj the Kansas City club under the reserve clause, was taken up and it was decided to Pickett to stay with the Broth- erhqjod. The action of the Cleveland contention in allowing to each club two per Jcent. of all the tickets issued as was reversed and the flgujte increased to three per cent. Dtriag the season each club will be known by a flag, as well as by a uniform. Each club will be provided with eight flags, and on the day of a game its own flag will fly from the flagstaff with that of the visiting team. The convention then adjourned SHE WAS DETECTED. Arrest of a Woman Who Intended to Give Out Home Pointers About Shoplifting. PHILADELPHIA, April woman giving the name of Rebecca Shipley and her residence as Staunton, Va., was ar- rested here yesterday for shoplifting. Whet taken before a magistrate she ac- knowledged that she bad stolen at store counters, but claimed that she had taken merely to see if she could do so without being detected. She had readj in the papers many romantio stories concerning shoplifters and she thought she would try her own hand at She said she had been stealing from numerous stores for a week or so and had all of the goods in her room with the price marks undisturbed. Her intention was to give a supper at her hotel to which she would invite the superintendents and head ladies of the different stores from which she had pil- fered and would return to then: the sto- len ptoperty. The woman was commit- ted to the county prison, pending an in- vestigation as to her sanity. FLOOD SUFFEKERS. Deplorable Condition of the Inhabitants of Mississippi Town Who Were Com- Abandon Their Homes. NEW OKLEAUS, April 3. Huntington, Miss., has been completely abandoned by its 500 inhabitants, about half of whom, with some of their stock, are crowded together on the levee, suffering from exposure, sickness and destitution. The others are living more comfortably in box cars. Many houses have floated away. Some residents of the neigh- borhood are also crowded upon the levees or have fled to the highlands. A similar condition of affairs prevails in nearly all the country around the break. The back water is spreading far into the interior. The Skipwith break has in- creased to 750 feet, the Ifita crevasse to and the others in proportion. The situation below Red river is much im- proved, but between that point and Helena the outlook is very gloomy. A LONE HIGHWAYMAN Holds Up a Stage and Secures Only Eigh- teen Hard Dollars for His Pains. SAX DIEGO, Cal., Anril The Ala- mosa stag-e -was held up Monday near Ensenada, Lower California, by a lone highwayman with a Winchester who ordered the nine men in the stage to throw out the International Company's bullion, which was to have been shipped by that trip. It happened that the 000 which was to have been shipped had been detained. Major Zimpelman, ot the El Paso mine, however, had in bullion with him and other passen- gers had about more, but all they threw out were eighteen Mexican dol- lars. On learning that tho treasure was not aboard the highwayman ordered the driver to proceed, which ho did. After- ward tho stage went back to the spot and search was made for the bandit, but without avail. Capital 1'anUhmcnt. Ai-r.ANY. X. Y.. April 3. In the As- sembly last night Mr. Curtis" bill abol- ishing capital punishment a special order. Mr. Hitt offered amendments to make tbe penal code conform to thebilL Tho amendments wero Mr. Tompkins said that Mr. Curtis had in- troduced the bill from the most h motives and to say tbn.1 bo was w in tbe interests of an company was of News Gathered In This State. THJE BUI to Chiiu Labor Now Law Kow Bctweca to of School Books by Hottkc. Stnate, April Senate tlus morning passed an important Introduced In the Bocae by Mr. Davis. It is now a law add pro- Tides an follows: '-No under the age of years shall be emnloyed by any person, firm or corporation in this State! at employ- ment whereby its life or limb is endangered, or its health is likely to be injured, or its morals be depraved by such etnplovmeot. Any person, firm or corporation in this State who wlllfnily causes or permits the life or limb of may child under the age of a I'e-n years to be endangered, or Its health to be injured, or its mora's to become depraved while actually ia thetr employ, or who willfully permits such child to be placed in such a position or to en- In such emolovment that its life or limb It in danger, or its health likely to be injured, or He morals likely to be imnaired by such employ- ment, shall be dremed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upoa conviction thereof bhall be fined in any sum cot less than f 10 nor more than 160, or imprisonment not less than thirty nor more than ninety days for each and offense." Bills passed as follows: To authorize the Coun- cil of Oberlin to issue bonds for the purpose of extending and erecting a stand pipe for its waterwoiks; to extend the tune forliling a bill of exceptions from thirty to forty duys, and granting opposing counsel and the court each five days in which to examine the bill, to provide for the reissuing of destroyed deeds to heirs of persons receiving the deed: making It obligatory on the State Inspectors of Work- chops and Factories to inspect buildings, whether request is county commissioners and township trustees to make pru utc contracts Tor the rdiuir of high- ways already improved. Senators Shaw and Alexander, members of the committee to inves- tigate the charpes against J. H New ton, lately appointed a Fish and Game Commissioner, had an unpleasant scene yesterday during a meet- ing of the committee Mr Alexander called a liar, and the latter replied in similar language. Mr. Shaw attempted to strike Mr. Alexander with a chair, but was> prevented from doing any damage by other Senators. The com- mittee, by u party vote, adopted the following: Moved, That inasmuch as Mr. Alexander being unwilling to produce any letters or other source of information in support of charges made by him against Mr. Newton, the committee in- struct its chairman to make his report in accord- ance with the evidence that has been produced. Bills were introduced as follows: Making it a crime to burn an insured building and contents when both are worth JO; to amend the statutes so as to allow pool selling on incorporated one- mile tracks during race meetings, to authorize assesitment insurance companies organized else- where to do business in Ohio: to relieve the Su- preme Court by giving Circuit Courts final juris- diction in certain cases The Senate passed the bill to authorize surety companies to do busi- neis in Ohio. effort was made to indefinitely postpone Mr. Htigerty's bill to repeal the local option law, on the calendar for second reading. A motion to refer the bill to the Committee on County ".ffairs prevailed, the division being strictly on party lines. Mr Geyer's bill intended to reduce the price of school books, was a spe- cial order in the House, and when it was reached the author expl ined its provisions and pro dieted a decline of one third in the cost of books to pupils if the b'll should be enacUd into a law. After a long debate the bill was passed by a vote of 81 yeas to 11 nays The bill making Ineligible memb.rs of the Gen- eral Assemblj for appointment as trustees ot State institutions passed by a vote of to 1. An exceptionds made so as not to Include mem- tocre of the present General-AsswmMy affeady members of boards Other trills passed were: To make more definite and certain the Inw rela- tive to expenditure of morey by heads of fle partments in Cleveland; to detnch certain land from the corporation of FinJlay, Han cock County. and restore the same to the townships from which it was tako-ninthe of the boom, appropriating 112.000 to purchase a and pay expenses of the commission appointed by the Governor, to locate an asylum for the epileptic insane: to submit to a of tho electors of Cincinnati a proposition to issue bonds for the pur- pose of constructing a market house; to pro- vide that guardians may lease coal lands of wards for mining purposes: providing that where a gas plant is ow-neJ by municipal corpo- rations they may film sh pas to villawb through which tbe lines pass, and also furnish sume to public institutions. MASONS AT WAR. Grand Lodge of Ohio and Forest City Lodge Enjoined From Expelling Three Cerneaa Kite Men. CLEVELAND, April .0 so called Cerneau Northern Jurisdiction Scottish Kite war, which has been waged with much vigor in this city and elsewhere in Ohio for some time past, has culmi- nated herein three lawsuits, which were commenced in the common pleas court Wednesday by T. M. Chandler, A. T. Anderson and A. E. Gilbert. The de- fendants are the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Ohio, Grand Master Leander Eurdick and two hun- dred and thirty officers and members of Forest City Lodge, Xo. 3S8, of Cleve- land, who have all been enjoined by Judge Lamsonfrom expelling the plain- tiffs on charges which were preferred recently by a grievance committee con- sisting of E. .T. Blandin, A. H. Weed and Abner Royce. Un-Masonic conduct is charged and there are nine specifica- tions. mainly referring to tho plaintiffs" connection with the "Corneau" Scottish bodies. Allen O. April 3. 0. Myers, editor of the Cincinnati Vorcu- piae, and Representative IV-nnrlL of Brown County, engaged in a eland catnc to blo-ws in tb" corridors of the House Wednesday afvmoon. Pen- uell was lizdlr worsted and rn-ars an t bis right in- ib" Sgbl 5a injured. Th" trouble oai of an patviion in BfcOWN TO PIECES. Three Men iMtanUy Killed and Six Badly Injured bjr a Boiler Explosion. HCTSOXVIU.E, 111., April will probably be lost through a boiler explosion here Tuesday. The stove mill of J. H. Bussing A Co. at this place was blown to pieces and the proprietor and one of his men instantly killed'. Xine persons were Injured. Of these three are fatally hurt and the wounds of two others are serious. The force of the explosion was teriffic, every building in town being shaken. The body of Mr. liussing was badly mangled. The factory was literally demolished, much valuable machinery being de- stroyed. The cause of the explosion is supposed to have been low water in the boiler. __ _______ HE SXUBBED THEM. How the Knglueer of an Ocean Liner Treated a Committee of Alarmed sengera. IXDIAXAFOI.IS, April 3. Concerning the disaster to the steamer City ot Paris, H. D. Pierce, of this city, who was a passenger when that ship made her famous passage inside of six days last August, says the strain upon the engines and machinery was so great as to attract attention and finally a num- ber of passengers who had crossed be- fore hold a meeting and called in a body on the chief engineer, who de- clined to permit a committee to go be- low in his department for any purpose, and refused also to communicate any- thing regarding the revolution of tha screws. I3S[ Dmappearance of an Express Package Consigned to a Chicago Dank. CHICAGO, March package con- taining in bills disappeared on Saturday between tbe office of the United States Express Company, in this city, and the National Bank of Illinois. The package was put into the safe of the express delivery messenger, but when the safe was opened at the bank it could not be found. The responsibil- ity for its loss has not yet been fixed and the express officials refuse to give the names of those who handled the money. If tho package is not found the express company will have to make good the amount to tho bank. Bucket Sflll in the Fight. ST. April new regime was inaugurated on tho Merchants' Ex- change and in the bucket shops Tues- day, owing to the withdrawal of the Chicago official quotations. On the Merchants' Exchange the New YorK quotations were substituted for those of Chicago, and this course is to bo con- tinued. The greatest interest is cen- tered in the bucket shops, who still declare that they will have no difficulty in furnishing Chicago prices to their customers. Defeated. SALTNA. Kan., April The election here was an animated one. The female suffragists had nominated a woman can- didate for the school board from two wards A colored woman was run by the anti-suffragists. The suffragiste were defeated and the colored woman elected by an overwhelming majority. At Hiawatha throe women were elected to the school board, but at Wellington the three women candidates were snowed under. of UceiKr Victorious. OMMFV. Neb., April 3. elections were held Tuesday in a num- ber of towns throughout the State. In nearly every case the principal issue was the license question. Out of twenty- seven towns heard from twenty voted for license and fo.ir against, while in three of them candidates from both license and anti-hcense tickets were elected. A number of the "wet" towns this year went dry at tho previous elec- tion. _ A Failure. XEW April Tho Herald's Aspinwall correspondent writes lhat he has made a thorough personal investiga- tion of tho condition of tbe Panama canal work. He finds it worse than tho worst that has heretofore been reported. .Tbe work actually done is but a drop in the bucket as compared with tbe whole. Tbe difficulties in carrying the cut through the Culcbra ridge arc unsur- uiountablo. la Indiana. ENM.IJSH. Ind.. April There are at least two dunned cases of leprosy in this vu-inity. The victims father and son. Tbf affliction is as toani- ffsting itself in that sink below tbe adjacent su-faci-. Icjf.Ti. and. if ini litigation ia it that other cases corn'- to frne of Jbc patients is well -n A-riril Mo.. April T irajco Vjtbis r__________ J X. H.. The Hoa. nb-r of the Sea- JIT -wrrb a J and r cats Ft" f--" II P   

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