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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: April 2, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - April 2, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SALEM DAILY NEWS. NO- 78. SALEM. OHIO, APRIL 2. 1890. TWO CENTS. FIFTY-FIKST CONGRESS. A Xmtttor of U1IU Paisrd by the BOOM, svilks Number ity-five, inty, Ky., Forty Into__ Property In Fay- of the Town State afternoon appro- relief of the suf- The latest re- e number of dead enty-flve. Many were reported to nd several dead two names. One cparate names in 5 an entire family listed among the Many who were rished and were lead since been discovered is resuming, the a feeling of en- prevails. of the most inter- is incidents con- ado, showing the rind. A block of r over 150 pounds cond story of the outhwestern rail- le Union Depot. it came from and om which it could me hundred yards tin roofing were irry'S farm near y miles from the jse on "West Main nd clinging to the iffice clock, but no I ever seen it be- where it came broken, but the S.20 p. m. A large' md in a 5t which was never 1 weigh over 100 nig store two bird s, were blown in The cages were rds are as full of occupied by Brand ;o men in Green a portion of the hrough the roof of of the factory. It timber, -te- which upright pieces of ame through the sitting around groom and the four ?d them in, but did least. It was one L escapes yet heard April 3. The which wrecked a town of Fayette- ted, are it will make them is "being raised in the wants of homes were de- sons who were in- less has been sus- rson who is able is of repairing resi- e are in need of 1 this will be sup- possible. A mam )me from east of ached Gallatin. He intry ind said the hat direction, and rty persons killed Glasgow. Commu- >ff and the report itiated. April total Webster County is d eighty- A relief roru Henderson. A Anderson contained 1 that it had been one hundred miles io bore for in tobacco firm, was re miles outside of WASHHccrosf, April SenaU morning pjiseS bill authoriz- MUsissippi Rxvcr Commission to par- eham or hire boats ts may be immediately necessary to rescue inhabitants of the over- flowed districts, aad to use the boats for that purpose. At the Senate went iato secret cession and at six p. m. adjourned. House passed S-nate bill creat- ing the office; of Surveyors Oeneral in North and South Dakota; House bill free of duty aitic'.es tivm .Mex-co to the St Louis Ex- position of 1800; House bill that affi- davits and declarations in pension cases may be taken before any orticer autnonzed to adminis- ter oaths Jorgere-al purpose-: providing that depositions of Uiiied Stales courts may be taken ia the mode prescribed by the laws of Sut s iu wui h -uch courts may beheld; Unmin0' to years the time with n wh-ch suns may be brought asam-it ac- counvng orticiTS their bon'.'jmcri: bill ex- empting from ihe provisions of law requir- ing steamers to carry lines, boats pljiag oil Inland ji aters of me United States The House then went into Committee of the Whole oil the Fortifications Appropriation bill and it was d It tinp-opriales J4 5H1.67S. The bill approtriatin? 8 e o t) Tor improving the Zoological Park in Distrct of Columbia was passed, with an omeadtiK-nt providing that the District shall bear lia'.r th- expense. The Naval Apnrop-miion bill reported. A resolution that tbe meet at eleven a m. and TVursSays and that the Maho wi h made a special order Tor those days was adopted. The resolutions of regret on the death of Hon. David WM'ier, of New York, providing for the r.ppa of a committee of seven from tbi- Hcuse and three from the Senate to attend h-s funer il The Speaker ap- pointed Messrs. Delano. Sawyer, Wal- lace. Bynum, Tracv und Lje as the committee on the part of the House. The House then ad- journed. ARCHES: KSCSIGNS. The Defaulting Tre.surer of Maryland Takes All the Ulrune for the Sh Upon Himself. AJTSTAPOLIS. Md., April silence which State Treasurer Stevenson Arch- er has maintained ever since the dam- aging cnarges against him have been made public has at last beon broken He himself has spoken, and bis friends can find little comfort in what he tells them. Yesterday Mr. Archer's resigna- tion was brought to Annapolis. Archer'; letter is as follows: El'-hu E Jackroi. Governor of herewith tender you my resigoaMon a Treasurer of llaryl .n I Durijg the four year of the incumbency of the office by me. over 113, SOO.ODO have beeu recuivjd and dibbursed by m; office every dollar of which his been scrupu lously accounte 1 for by ths etfle'ent, laboriou and honest employes in my office, so that th boohs correspond exactly with t'no charge 'a-ralnst m" in tbe Co-np'rolK-r's office. I sa' this in justice to those o Beers. The safe deposi boxes in Baltimore, which hel i the slukin fnnd belonging to the St.ue were sole control, no other person ever having access to them since 1 have bsen in offloe Any irreiru larity in the funds in those fcoves is attributable to me dlone. If this can be explained then. I must submit mj self to the maiesty of the law. Respectfully, STEVL.SSON AIICHER. SOLEMN OBSEQUIES. National Banking Code Proposed by a Congressman. Beflnlts of Experiments With High Explosives for Naval and Military Use. BROKEN LEVEES. Uu.ir.ct by Some time ago there ispiracy to defraud at Temesvar, flun- were two tny. The conspira- i prize of one million if A. As a result of have been the holder of the ind two implicated anr. were sentenced 1 servitude. Sold. East Ten- t Georgia Railroad for the pur- system, compris- es of road, for j >mas. of the -purchas- j ;d'-a to Funeral Services of the fcate Archbishop Heiss of La Crosse, MILWAUKEE, Wis., April ob- sequies of the late Archbishop Michael Heiss, of the diocese of place Tuesday morning at St. John's Cathedral, where the remains have been laying in state since Saturday. Every portion of the sacred structure was crowded. Inside the chancel clad in full vestments were Cardinal Gib- bons. Archbishops Ireland, of St. Paul, and Feehan, of Chicago, and thirteen Bishops. Over a hundred priests from this and adiacent provinces also present. The funeral ceremonies were of the usual imposing nature and at the con- clusion the casket was conveyed to St. Francis Seminary. The final interment will take place to-day in tho vault be- neath the chapel of St. Francis, beside the remains of Rov. Dr. Salzman, his life-long friend.___________ No More Quotations. CHICAGO, April order of the di- rectors of the Board of Trade, the differ- ent telegraph companies removed every wire and instrument from the exchange hall yesterday. The companies will not even be permitted to messages from the main floor to their offices be- low, and all business hereafter will have to be done through messengers. This radical step is taken by the board to pre- clude all possibility of bucket shops se- curing tbe quotatiions, Domestic Trouble Causes a Suicide. ISE-W YOKK, April Marks, a wealthy commission merchant, commit- ted suicide Tuesday at his residence by shooting himself in the bead. He had recently had a quarrel with his wife he married last October. She left the house and Marks seemed greatly de- pressed over the occurrence. On Mon- day he received a message from Mrs Marks which is supposed to have been refusal to return to him and to have lod to the suicide.____________ A New Break In the ILevce. YicK-r.CF.o. Miss.. April of a new break at Austin. Miss., and o wavering levees elsewhere are inducing manv families to move beyond the danger line- is surrounded and partly inundated. Mayorsville has yielded to the flood. There is no of life reported from recent breaks, but many head of stock have perished and much property n ruined. for KctablUhlDff an Efflcleat tcna of Ocean Protect Against an Xescmre. WASHINGTON, April Walker, of Massachusetts, has introduced in the House a bill to establish an National banking code. The bill provides for the deposit of coin and coin cer- tificates for circulation to the amount of ten per cent, of their capital by banks of capitals of or less. In addi- tion to the ten per cent, that the banks are required to take from the Govern- ment, they have a right, by tho bill, to issue currency notes for the amount ot their coin and certificate reserve. Banks are relieved of all taxation and ex- penses, except the expense of redeem- ing their notes. On the insolvency or expiration ol the charter of a bank the notes are to be redeemed by the '.treas- urer of the United States in coin. The banks are given authority to issue notes not to exceed eighty per cent, of their total circulation. Secretary Proctor sent to the Senate yesterday, as bearing on the proposition to test high explosives, an extract from the programme of tests adopted by the Board of Ordnance and Fortification. The board holds that experiments with high explosives should be restricted to promise ultimate success. This, the report says, is not the case with Americanite, "because the liquid form and the liability to become dangerous through evaporation or by lying in store would forbid its use in the military service, unless trials should demonstrate that no other variety free from these objections can be so used." The report says there has been unquestioned proof that Americanite is liable to deteriora- tion, Mr. Turner, of New York, yesterday introduced in the House a jSint resolu- tion requesting the President to com- municate through the Secretary of State with the foreign powers interested in rans-Atlantic travel, with a view to se- ;uring their co-operation in the estab- ishment of an eflicieat system of ocean >atrol, which snail include the employ- ment of such a bci vke of vessels, or such suitable vessels as may be avail- able for this purpose, The resolution is accompanied by a long prologue setting lorth the necessity for _the better pro- GUEXYII.LE, Miss., April The water haa not made much additional en- croachment since Monday night, but the heavy rain has added greatly to the dis- comfort of the situation. The water now higher at some places outside the levee than in the river and is pouring back into the stream. It ie also going back through the Offutt crevasse into the river. This lessens the danger here, but the Easton crevasse is still pouring1 water out over the country. There has been no loss of lire-stock. The mayor has appointed a committee to aid any- one who may be in distress. The Cotton Exchange has adopted resolutions con- tradicting the sensational and unfounded reports as to the seriousness of the situ- ation here. Should the flood subside within thirty days a good crop can he made and the effects of the overflow will not be felt a year from now. The river is Stationary. HELENA, Ark.. April to the break of the levee at Austin, Miss., Helena has received some relief, the river falling one inch during the last twenty-four hours. A heavy rainfall prevails here and a rise is expected. The stock that has been saved from the flood'are having a fearful time with- standing the attacks of the buffalo gnat, that swarm in myriads. There is con- siderable indignation over tbe report circulated by Sergeant Dunn, of New York, to the effect that the levees about Helena had been completely swept away by the flood. It is untrue; the levees around Helena are in splendid condition. FJEMININJE VOTERS. MS OF THE ME. In Neighboring and Cities. Towns OUR LAW-MAKERS. Work of Ocean. A committee from the American Ticket Sellers Association appeared be- fore the Commerce Committee of the House yesterday and made a protest against the bill introduced by Repre- sentative Baker, of New York, provid- ing for the amendment of the Inter- State Commerce law prohibiting the sale or transfer, by any person not hav- ing the certificate of a regularly ap- pointed ticket agent, of any ticketissued by a common carrier. COMPULSORY EDUCATION. Advocates of the Repeal of the Wisconsin Carry the Municipal Election io Milwaukee by a Large Majority-. Wis., April the municipal election Tuesday the Demo- crats elected their entire ticket. George W. Peck, the proprietor of Peck's Sun, Democratic candidate for mayor, has a plurality over Brown (Republican) of Brown is the present mayor and was a candidate for re-electioa. N. S. Murphy, who was the late Matt Carpen- ter's law partner, headed a The chief issue in the election was the Bennett compulsory education law. The Protestants favor the law. while the Catholics wish it repealed. Mr. Peck was understood to side with the repeal- ers. The fight on the Bennett law is expected to have an influence in State politics. _______________ Celebration of BUnnarck> Birthday. April celebration cf Prince Bismarck's seventy-fifth birthday atFriedrichsruho yesterday was charac- terized by more enthusiasm and general festivity than have marked any similar occasion since the observance of the old Chancellor's natal day became an occur- rence of national interest Five special trains loaded with Prince Uisroarck'sad- mirers mingled their freight with that of the regular trains which landed thou- sands of persons at Frled richsmho dur- ing the da- and the castle was thronged with visitors uniil a late hour. Hoi? the Women of Kannaa Succeeded la Their Scramble for Office. TOPEKA, Kan., April Elections were held in Kansas yesterday in sixty cities of the first, second and third class for councilmen and members of school boards. In nearly all the cities no po- litical lines were drawn and the battles were fought on purely local issues, Tho only interest attaching to the elections was the exercise of the suffrage by women, who are permitted under the laws of Kansas to vote for city officers and "members of school boards. At Manhattan, where the women cap- tured all the city offices two years ago, they-had another ticket in the field Tuesday and it was elected over the three other tickets. In Luis City, out of a total registration of about 600 women, only about 425 voted. At Atchison the result was disastrous to the women, who started out to cap- ture four members of the school board. One woman candidate is Lydia she had no opposi- -tioni5-- At Emporia over 000 women voted. Only one woman was a G. R. Jackson. She was elected, al- though opposed by many of her sex, who supported an anti-Prohibitionist. City of Paris Resumes Her Voyage. LONDON, April 2. The following statement, made by tbe agents of the Inman steamship line, has been tele- graphed from Queenstown: "The flooded compartments of the steamer City of Paris have all been pumped dry. Close examination shows that the bottom of the vessel is uninjured and that all the bulkheads are sound, except those in the engine room, which were somewhat damaged from the pounding of tho broken machinery. The steamer left Queenstown for Liverpool last night." City Workmen CHICAGO. April thousand jonr- neyanen plumV-r? quit work yesterday, demanding SS.55 for an day as tho day 5 the RACISE. Wis.. April the muni- cipal election here Tu-sdny the Demo- crats elected ovcry man bat one on the city ticket .ind f.re c-Jt of men- The vote is in opposition to the IT closing of saloons. Mayor i. who has beta tho f-x- A Sweeping Democratic Victory. CHICAGO, April Democrats elected their entire ticket here yester- day for assessors, collectors, clerks, su- pervisors, etc., and for the first time in the history of Chicago there is not a Re- publican town officer in the territory bounded by the old lircits. The Demo- crats elected twenty aldermen and the Republicans twenty-one. The next council will be a tie with Mayor Cregier (Democrat) to cast the deciding vote. railed for rim.A-DEt.LinA, April liabili- ties of Noah N. Rosenberger. the wool- en manufacturer! who assigned yester- day, are about assets notstated. Rosenberger attributes his difficulties to the failure of various parties to make prompt delivery of manufactured goods, whereby a large stock that he had on hand was rendrred valueless on account of being out of season. The ParneU-O'Shea Scandal. April Tarnell has filed denials in the case of Captain O'Shea vs. Parnellas co-respondent, and Mrs. O'Shea has asked a month's delay in filing her pleas. Captain O'Shoa will oppose the granting of further delay, be- lieving that postponement is sought for political eflcct. It is now regarded as impossible to bring the case to trial be- fore autumn. tk-e JWatrh. NKW YottK, April St.-lobn. who claims tbe foil fencinsr champion- ship of th" United States. dc- Ssrjreant William Williams, laic the Guards. :a a feacinjr j tsaVh of T.y ujf-jnV-T.'; of Btntte, ApHl The Senate this morning the bill to tax telegraph and expresa companies so as to Icc'ude telephone and big car companies and then It. Bills yavsed tbe Senate us follows To authorize the Tillage of East Palestine to issue to pur- chase rubber hose and other p re apparatus; to aMthoriie the Council of Liberty Cenwr. Henry Oountv, to funds; to authorize of Henry County to is-sue bonds fortne redemption of other boids; to refund the fishing net tax of April 1SW. amounting to providing that in ths insanity of husband or wife, the other muv convey real to give ihe mayor of Cleveland veto power over ordinances and resolutions involv- ing the expenditure of money or the granting of contracts; making the November election day legal holiday and allowing all employes the two hours from noon to two p. m. on that without loss of Bills introduced: To ex- empt wholesale liquor de.ilers from payment of the Dow tax to authorize the tmrchvse of per- manent camping ground-! for the State militia at cost not to exceed to abolish the board of visitors for the Ohio Sol fliers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home: to give village covnc Is power to require the grading of sidew.iius as well as of streets. authorizing the appointment by the Governor of board of five trustees, citizens of Lucas County, to erect and complete au urmory Build- ing for the Ohio National Guard in Lucas Coun- ty, the cost not to excet d Other bills passed: To authorize the city of Wellsvllle to borrow money for street improvement purposes for the protection of smaller stockholders in the consolidation of railroads. Hunt offered a motion to tafee up and refer Senate bill creating a board of rail- road iXMnmlssioners, but objections were raised and the motion was withdrawn. The call of counties for the Introduction of bills was then continued, and the following were passed under suspension o' the rules: Authorizing Green- ville, Darke County, to vote on A proposition to Issue sreneral improvement bonds; to divide Delaware township. Defiance County, into two election precincts; authorizing the commissioners of Franklin Oouuty to transfer all the unexpended balance of the dog fund, after paying all sherp claims, to the general expense" fund; to authorize Cedarville. Greene Countv, to borrow for villase e.Tpenscs; to add additional territory to South Ridge school district, Henry County; authorizing the board of education of South Ridge upeclal school district. Henry County, to in bonds for building and purchasing school house; authorizing Cleveland to issue JiW.000 in bonds to meet deficiencies in the fire depart- ment; to authorize the trustees of townships In Ottawa County, to unite and levy a special tax to erect a so'diers' monument; to authorize an eight mill additional school levy in New Straits- Tille. Perry County; to increase the board of managers of the Intermediate penitentiary from three to five; to authorize the commissioners of Sandusky County to purchase or condemn a site and issue bonds for a court house to au'hortre the making of the State n party to litigation in Summ't County to authorize Niles, Trumbull County to issue bonds for public works The following bills were introduced and re-id the first time: To authorize thf> s'hool board of Youngstown to levy one mill additional tax for a fcbool building, reducing the fees of all county officers twenty five per cent. to provide that owners of water rights shall not have ex- clusive bunting and fishing privileges; to com- pel railronds to intercininse and deliver freight from one road to another: to amend Sec- tion 2732 so as to authorize the State Board of Equalization to drop from the tax list property of private educational inbtitutions regarded by thenr-trf-STifflcienttmportanee to warraut this course to give to prob.vte courts jurisdiction with common pleas courts In all misdemeanor cusss; requiring sidewalks in cities and villages to be at least six fejtwide; to nniliori7p to issne (00 bonds for natural gas; to tax pawnbrokers S250 a year and note sh.ivers and those who loan money on chattel mortgages in Cincinnati ITjOO a year; to amend Section so as to provide for joint proceedings between counties where ditches pass through both to take from the Governor the power of aopointing election boards give the power to the common pleas judges, ex- cept in Cincinnati, whero tho Superior Oourt shall appoint, to prevent railroad companies from dealing in iron. ooal. stone and other along the lire of the road: to amend the truant law so that it shall apply to children between fourteen and sixteen; miking nn un- lawful personal injury cause for attachment; to provide that hunting or shooting on marsh lands shall not be liabl" for trespass. Mr Gpyer renortocl back Mr Forbes' bill au- tnnrizing the Bra-d of Public AVnrks to lease or Walhoni'uiR canal Aljng argument followed and ihe bill was finally passed. Findlay Factory Burned. FJNDLAY, O., April 2. Fire at an early yesterday morning partially de- stroyed the building and the greater >art of the machinery of the Cleveland argot factory, situated in tho southern )art of the city. The fire in tho )itcb room, and owing to the combusti- )ie nature of tbe contents spread rapid- y. The loss trill reach fully severed by insurance. The works will be rebuilt at once, but about 100 hands arc temporarily thrown out of employ- ment. SEQUEL, TO A RIOT. Man ud Another Fatally Italian I Watch ka a Bttttte. PiTTRBvisc, April Bell died at the Homeopathic Hospital day night and Antonio cannot survive injuries received at Stoop't Ferry, on the Pimburg 
                            

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