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Salem Daily News: Thursday, March 27, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - March 27, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SALEM DAILY NEWS. NO. 73. SALEM. OHIO, THURSDAY. MARCH 27. 1890. of Conductoi aliug, Passenger Train at Regarding the IT, The Board sioners yesterday ir investigation of ike Shore Mich- ad on March 0 at six persons were ie injured. Com- >ok the testimony n the train pulled as also gave way, hose was frozen taling had refused tor replace it, the i automatically, as e. Notwithstand- ts the conductor tuffalo. lie did not v and when near rain parted. When ticed Houghtaling to stop the train, worst thing that It looks as if the s automatic brake ie train suddenly, ir section to crash Cond uctor Hough- y culpable in not it in condition at as he left Dunkirk the condition tbej st have notified the r. porters and rear act, so that thef ho lookout. It ap- nony that he did gs. His conducl mark able from the of sixty-six years irne a good repu- ;onductor and has th a serious acci- the opinion that iwed bad judgment ion, inasmuch aa [formed him that ke on the five reai Is his conduct upon No. 2, prin ted upon Is, states that "con- rge of trains, "and having been re- ctor it was his duty e a careful exam- zoupler which gave e edge had been cen away, leaving an two and a half sligh t as to enable jerked open. The ch couplers are in ngefous and should nrdered. H. At- >ur years, a lawyer, at his office, No. elix Palmer, fore- e movers who were the office. Atkin- wirh Palmer, who the head with a crushing his skull. Ue claims that fense. as Atkinson pistol. Xo weapon jn. by Fire. rci: freight lly's Station, a few lafi night. nd collision. The Src to two hotels In no fire only a Jturkct line frroi FiUmr-FIRSTjCONGUESS. to Statehood of Wyoming Dto the House, While the Tract BUI Time WASBIHGTOK, March Wy bill wae takei up yesterday. Mr. Barnes Of Georgia, opposed the bill because he believet that there were gross irregularities in the adop tionof the constitution of Wjoming; becauM he believed that the Territory "did not contain t population requisite lor admission into tht Union, and because there was incorpo: ted ID the constitution features based upon ie sub- ject of female nuflrage which were antagonistic to republican Institutions. Mr. Carey, or Wyoming made a strong plea lor the admission of the Territory which he rep- teaented Into the sisterhood of States Mr. Gates, of Alabama, tbat no new Stale had ever coma into the Uuiou on the terms proposed in taxs women were to have the right to vote and to hold oTIce. It a del cate question, and he looked with, neat apprehension upon tfce growing ten   America in 1SSO and in 3ST.S to this city, where he ac'-cd as a designer at prin: for thirty was always invrertrd in educational jnovc- anti-slavery and similar reforajs. oC rill ItalMlat ftel ot Life Capital. l3TDiA3tArous, March 27. Coroner Wagner has completed his investigation of the disaster connected with the Bow- en-Merrill fire, which occurred on March 17 and which resulted in the killing oi twelve firemen. The verdict in each of the eases, twelve in number, was alike, with the exception that the deaths did not all occur on the same day. The find- ing was as follows: "Anthony Voltz came to his death March 1890, through injuries re- ceived from falling timbers and brick at the Bowen-Merrill fire while in the dis- charge of his duty as a member of the fire department, the building collapsing after the fire was under control. The Bowen-Merrill building was constructed at different periods, having been en- larged to accommodate an increased Stock and weight on a foundation not so intended by its original builder, the changes and additions culminating in a superstructure depending in part for its support upon adjoining buildings equally faulty. Building experts and owner declared on oatb. they would not now erect such a building. The fire, while the immediate agent, was not of itself sufficient to cause the collapse. I find that the building was of faulty con- struction." DISASTER AND DEATH. Extensive Conflagrations In the Chief City of lietweea Cniuese and Dutch Troop.s. SAN FRANCISCO, March from China and Japan by the steamer City of Peking state that on February 27 about Japanese houses were burned in Tokio and seventy-eight others partially destroyed. Two persons were killed and twenty-five firemen in- jured. On February 29 seventeen houses were burned in Tokio, and on March 5 850 were destroyed. The fires were all of accidental origin. Several serious encounters between Dutch troops and a party of Chinese are reported. The former met with severe losses. A party of Dutch convicts while trying to clear a jungle were fired on from ambush. A detachment of troops was driven back the next day with nine wounded and Lieutenant Muller was killed and Captain Van Heust was also shot, several men being severely wounded. _______________ Should be Stopped at Once. HELENA, Mont., March have for some time been current of the denuding of the public lands in Montana of timber by foreign corporations. This work has been going on in the vicinity of the Gate Mountains, the timber be- prepared for ties, telegraph poles, etc., and sbipped down the Missouri river to Great Falls. Special Agent Gardner, when asked about the matter, said the attention of the department had been called thereto, and that a stop would be soon be put to it- Conn anil Lout in the River, CLARKSYTLLE. Tean.. March unusual accident happened while the driver of a hearse was crossing a creek much swollen by high water. Thehearse contained the corpse of a colored per- son, and in crossing the creek the water came up so high that it caused the doors of the vehicle to come open and the coffin and body of the negro floated down the stream and were lost. Royal of Temperance. IU-FFALO. X. Y.. March day was the second day of the thirteenth annual session of the Supreme Council. Royal Templars of Temperance. At the morning session two special committees were appoin ved. The afternoon session was consumed in this consideration of lac risua! and dejrrecs of the order. The session was deroiied wnsid- StaV: of the STATE PARAGRAPHS. Items of Interest From ent Ohio Towns. THE LEGISLATURE. Bosy Daj la Both of the OWB- Marrh ant ojx-n in -f -of tb and Ar March Arch- In natnr Jor Senate, March M.-The only general bill pa0ae4 wn Mr. Qrtffln's House bill making it a misde- meanor for a man to desert a family dependent on him (or support and d recline courts to place convicted under this act under bond to support their families. Other bills were MMtdaa follows: To authorize the city ot Newark to borrow TO construct a sewer la eastern part of the city; to authorize the village of Miamiaburg, Montgomery County, to borrow for street improvements; to au- thorize the village of Logan, Hocking County, to borrow IBAO for natural pu-poses; to Au- thorize the board of education of Washington C. H., Fayette County, to the time for tte payment of bonded indebtedness to au- thorize the village of Elyria to transfer funds; to authorize the purchase and erection of flat; and flag raising implements for the Jf clntosii flags by the trustees of the several townships of Portage County: to authorize the of Pike County to levy a tai for feneral county purposes The following nomi- nations were received from the Governor and properly referred: John Blythe, of Crawford County, trustee of the Working Home for the Blind, for the term ending the first Monday in Anrtl. 1W1 W. C. Burnett, of Morrow Coun- ty, trustee of the same institution for five years 1 T U.inim ns, of Greene County, trustee'of the Davlon Insane Asylum for the term ending April 13, 1891, and Isaac N. Walker, of Warren County, and Peter Murphv. of Butler County trustees of the mtf 'ution for the terms ending In April. 1893 and 1893 respective- ly; J. S. Hare, of County, and T. P. Evans, of Montgomery County, trustees of the Deaf and Dumb Asylum for one year and two years John Beatty, of Franklin County, trus- tee of the Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Roma for one year; Roelid Brlnkerhoff, of Richland Coun- ty, and John G. Oorea. of Montgomery Countv, members of the Board of State Chanties; A. D. Marsh, of Mercer County, trustee of the Bbnd Asylum for two years; John C. Hutsinpillar, of Gallia Countf. trustee of the Athens Insane Asylum; Alfred E. Lee, of Franklin County, trustee of the Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Or- phans' Home; Joseph H. Newton, of Licking County, Commissioner of Fish and forun- exp'red term ending May 17, William B. Burnett, of Clarke Countv, manager of the In- termediate penitentiary for the unexpired term ending April 11. 1801. The House resumed the consideration of the General Appropriation bill, the question being on agreeing to Mr. Geyer's amendment giving to the Miami and Erie canal JlO.OOO in addition to the receipts The canal men and anti-canal men locked horns on the proposition. Mr. of Hocking, took the ground that suf- ficient money should be appropriated or the canals aban oned. came from the Republican side. "Agreed to what, gentlemen 7" asked Mr. Price. The abandonment of the canals." "I am not agreed to that: I wnnt an responded Mr. Price, and be proceeded to make a strong argument in favor of the amendment. Mr Kense. chairman of the Financf Comtn ttee, on record as being in favor ot abandoning the canals if they were not self-supporting. Messrs. McKelvey, Laylin and Taylor opposed the amendment, but Messrs. Munson, of Licking, and Griffin, of Lucas, favored it. Mr. Grifnn created quite a stir with his speech The condition of the canals, he said, was not the result of natural decay It was not a case of suicide, but one of willful murder. New York's canals were built before those in Ohio and ttiey have not fallen into de- cay because the railroads took the traffic away The railroads in Ohio had injured the canals through influence with their management. Penuicg action on the' amendment the House rrcessedto 2-30 p. m On reassembling Mr. Geyer again spoke in f.ivor of the amendment. Mr. Keeves. of Aslitabula, also favored it, while Messrs. Hudson and Taylor, of Cham- paign, opposed it. No notion taken on the amendment. Considsra'ion of the General Ap- propriation bi 1 was postponed to take up the special orders, bemvrthe bills to redistrlct the city of Dayton, providing for a of Public Affairs for Columbus and to dissolve a joint school district in Washington County. All the Republican members nere present, and only two Democrats were absent. The bills were all passed without Mr. Gaumcr then reported back his bill to repeal the registration law In all cities of the third and fourth grades Of the second class and to provide that new boards In cities where the law is left intact shall be appo nted the Governor. The bill wipes out the registrat'oi law in ail cities of the State except Cleveland. Colnmbus. Cine nnnti. To'.edo and Dayton. The bill was read a ttdrd time and referred to the author as a select committee of one. with leave to report at any time. DISASTROUS BLAZE. The Village 1'looeer Great ajrr Kroiu Emrty Kire. O.. March fioncer. a vil- lage of SOU inhabitants, fourteen miles north of here, was visited by a dis- astrous fire Wednesday tnominsr at two o'clock. The entire northwestern part of the town was destroyed. Affloajr tho were: wnzon and blncksmith shop. Woodruff's Tri-State Alliance priti tinjj office. Kred Spade, agricultural II. T. Thomas" inar- V. C. phoio- jrall'TT. Ilaviland's Mock, two William IVrkini" naallinrry, and JUSTICE CAMPBELL DEAD. JarUt of Michigan PMMM Away A KatfML DETBOIT, Mich., March 17. Justice V. Campbell, of the Michigan Supreme Tourt, a member of the Supreme bench since ISoy, died suddenly at his home in this city yesterday morning. Justice Campbell was born in New York in 1823, came to Michigan in early life and was one of the pioneers of State. He has been Chief Justice of th bench in rotation nine times; has been a law professor of the University of Michigan since the organization of the law de- partment of that institution; w as one ot the standing committee of the Protest- ant Episcopal diocese of Michigan, and was a man of wide culture. His death was caused by heart disease. Hli family found him dead in his chair, where he had died while reading a newspaper. REMARKABLE SCENE. Ovation Tendered nturck tho of Blood and Iron" and Like a Child. BERLIN', March Yeste rday while Prince Bismarck was dri ving past a bridge situated between the Tusgarten and Unter den Linden, the at- tached to the carriage sh ied and their legs became entangled in the traces. When the horses had been controlled a throng of people gathered about the or- Chancellor. A remarkable scene ensued. many of the ladies present 'flinging bouquets at the Prince, while others seized and kissed his hands. The "man of blood and iron" while attempting to falter out his thanks broke down and wept. The accident was trifling in its nature and the Prince, resuming his seat, drove off amid the cheers of the Crowd. _ __ THE PLAN FAILED. Train KoMn-rs IMay a Losing Game In a Texm Town. EL PASO, Tex., March 27. Six mounted robbers entered the house of section boss Smith at Go mez, on the Texas Pacific railroad. Mo nday night They bound and gagged Sm ith and held him prisoner, together with his Mexi- can laborers and, talcing bis lantern, endeavored to sig-nal tho approaching east-bound p issenjror train. Sf ot know- ing the signal code they could not make tbo lantern work properly. They then took Smith's switch key aud threw the switch so as to ditch the train. The switch was a "split" and the train rode over it in safety. The robbers tried to board tho train in passing, but it was traveling too fast. Lined rockets and NEW YOUK, March J. Bartlett Cooke, who styled himself president of the American Development Company, and occupied expensive offices at !No. 45 Broadway, has disappeared and it is al- leged that S9.300 confided to him by hia employes and others went v. ith him. J. H. Tyler. entered the Develop- ment Company's employ as chief clerk, says Cooke has belonging to him. for which Tyler has only worth less stock in the concern to show. Treaclicr Arrested for Mail Robbery. MOBILE, Ala., March Rev. Preston Chancy, while preaching at a country place over the Florida line, was called outside bv a messenger, who told him his mother was very ill and had sent for him. Chancy dismissed the congrega- tion, and on going out was a rrcsted by a deputy marshal for robbing the mailf at Dutton. Ala., ftve years ago. Chancy admitted that he was the tn an wanted. He was taken to Hunts ville fo r trial. Alliance Aarlcnltenkl STAUSTON. Va.. March George Crisman. Jacob Wissicr and Mr. Prince, representing the Al- liance of the States, bare con- cluded establish the Alliance ayricul- sural works at Iron Allegheny Va. The will vmploj from to .VK> hands aad their prodncU will U> sub-alliance tbe country, four million _______ _ tlw C. linjr Mary wilfc ho had SB Slarcli. Hall was Vjial wsll >Jarrb rxTttrl-siartJ otr and  v. wilW IW-VM '-t. -i'H W> 11 x if I tllP- l  m- H- M .1 M I I w _ H ii i" n i. i" i n TH. fc, 1- r   

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