Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Salem Daily News: Thursday, March 20, 1890 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - March 20, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SALEM DAILY NEWS. NO. 67. SALEM. OHIO, THURSDAY. MARCH 20. TWO CENTS )'S FAIR. r Its .Location se of Represent- ial (Committee. Folly Protected by h Are Kxtreukelj ire Saececa. 20. Mr. Candler, Committee, sub- esterday the re- on the Chicago large part is de- the different see- ch have already i these dispatches. arizes a national f a local corpora- j original bill, to Fair the site, ns of the build- tendered by the ider the laws ol "World's Exposi- lat the committee ,ion recognizes ive been raised and has created under is suggestion wai tatives of the cit3 ccord (says the re taken in the for ration; it is icves the Govern tion or connectioi that every thing lection of the IB buildings shall corporation witt will deliver it loi lition, without anj art of the United implied or other- ,-hich the Govern r its own commis exhibit. The com by this act to ao ly when they shall quate for the pur are intended. Th de Raised. reh lening the Denver route over Cum- r many weeks of T miles along the .hirty feet deep and ion houses, stations have been buried of Durango and west part of tho down to short ra- out a month ago. eh branch of rkers has been or- o'tijecis of the or- the miners of district; to ask for rents ton for of the present rate I'.-raand tho enforce- >ur system on and ranizatioti embraces flivr; miners of tbii nc Not Oniltj. March Couduc- nrraajnfd :n tht with railroad conductor Senator Voorheet Speaks on tlie of Agricultural Depression Contested Election Case in the House. March 2U Pres- ident Morton yrj-rerJay res ;m "1 the chair ot the presiding officer Tne resolution ottered by Mr. Voorhees las; Jtonuay a; 10 agricultural depression was taken up :iud Mr. Voorhees ad- dressed the Senate in relation to it. It was now nearly thirrx ho said, since the close of a terrio e war had to unhal- lowed avarice an o jyortua cy to prey upon the sell sacrificing p itriots of t'ae country. The measures thea n.-or ed to fo- the taxation of one class ol citizens an i f >r tli; enrichment of another das; Imd been ttio ;oa'is'.ation by which the burden or pub ic fleet haj been doubled, silver dem u -tu-d .tnd a high tariil established. Mr. Vooih-je lield tluii tue value ol improved farm land had decreased fxirty three per In the lastjfive years The Educational bill was then taken up. Mr. syoko in opposition to the bill, or in favor of action on it until next December. Mr. Evarts followed with a speech in support of the bill. Mr. Call spoke in favor of the He sui.portpd it because it was a donation without condit ois. Mr. Bate obtained the floor and the tnU went over. The Senate then ad ouraed. Cooper, of Ohio a member of the Committee on Elections n? the Mary- land contest case of vs. Co'ciuton. Mr Laoey, of Iowa, o >en d t le disc .ssioa with an argument in support of tho claims of the con testant. Messrs D.ilzell, of Pennsylvania, ant Greenholgh of, Ma-'iijaus'jtts. also spoke for thft contestant: Hoisrs Moore of Texas, and Gibson, of Maryland, for the sitting member. Pending a vote the House adiourned. IN A DEATH TKAP. Five Miners Entombed in a Hurtling Shaft Avenues or Kscape Being Cat Ofl They Perish. HURLEY, Wis.. March Tues- day night fire was discovered on the third level of Xo. 2 shaft at the Ger- mania miae. The alarm was given and the men working below were quickly warned of their danger. William Banks, James Sullivan, James Thomas and his son, Joseph Thomas, at work below the fifth and sixth levels were cut off before they could come up the fourth level and pass to No. 3 shaft and thence to the-sur- face, and perished. Hugh Waller, fore- man of the gang-, reached the surface, but went below to warn the men and it is thought he perished with them. Yesterday the bodies of James Thomas and son were found. The origin of the fire is unknown. The damage is esti- mated at and is likely to ex- ceed that amount before being extin- guished, as the shaft is caving from the surface. Efforts are being made to con- fine the fire to the west portion of tho mine, but this may be impossible, aithe timbering is very dry. The Major Has Skipped. NEW YORK. March case of Major "William Clarke, who shot at Mr. Randolph in front of the South- ern Society's rooms some weeks ago, was called for trial before Judge Mar- tine yesterday. Clarke did not answer and his bail was forfeited. His bonds- man is V. K. Stevenson, a real estate dealer, and the amount of the bond was El.000. It is that Clarke has left the city. ____________ Court-Martial VAI.T.E.TO. CaL. March 20 court- martial convened at Mare Island to try Commander Coghlan. of the United States steamer Mohican, for tmblicly j She navy, naval discipline and naval officials, is ended. Although the court has been insewioa since March jr. it wasnnabie to produce witnesses to as civilians can not be made 'M aprx-ar before naval court-mar tials. Halelfto Crevaate U 3.OOO reet Wide Twelve Feet and Rapidly Growing Larger. HELENA, Ark., March town of Clarendon is nearly submerged from the White river, which has been rapidly rising. Some parts of the Arkansas Midland railroad track between here and Clarendon are six feet under water. The road will not take passengers or freight tor Clarendon and trains run only 10 Holly Grove. Mail is transferred to Clarendon in boats. The Monroe Circuit Court, which was being held at Claren- don, as adjourned on account of tho high water, which prevented parties from at- tending. LAKE PROVIDENCE, La., March The river has fallen nine inches here since the break and is still falling slow- ly. The weather is fair. The Raleigh crevasse at three p. m. Wednesday was feet wide and twelve feet deep. The water was going through with tre- mendous force. TALLtnoAii, La., water from the Raleigh crevasse extends west of here to the hills of Bayou, but is not rising as rapidly as was feared, because it finds many natural outlets. The rail- road is not yet overflowed. GREENVILLE, Miss., March Offut break had widened to thirty-five feet at p. m. yesterday. One of the ends has been secured. The other will, it is believed, be secured to-day. The water is eight feet deep through the break. VICKSBURG, Miss., March20.-Twoseri- ous breaks have occurred in the levees north of this at Lunar, Ark., and the other on tho Mississippi side, in Miller's Bend, six miles below Arkansas City. This water will overflow all that section of the Yazoo delta west of Deer creek and north of Yazoo river. The break is seventy-five feet wide. The evee board and the Mississippi Valley ailroad authorities are doing all in heir power to top breaks. SIBERIAN HOltKORS. Ldditional Farts Regarding the Uevolt the Exiles at Irkutsk. 1 in S-V ttn- GKCVAKA. Miss- franv iaclos-re V> th? of brick >il G. Chealbaw jiaid -be jc-aalty March 20. -The correspond- mt of the Daily News at St. Petersburg lays the Russian government is very lisagreeably impressed by the indigna- lon meetings which have boon held in Sngland and America to protest against ;he Siberian outrages. A Siberian cor- respondent sends details of the Irkutsk ffair. Tho prisoners were suspected of complicity in the explosion at the church ast March. They lived in perfect com- fort at Irkutsk until the police discov- ered unmistakable evidence of treachery among them. The leaders were then sent to the mines and those remaining were informed that their terms of exile would be prolonged. The exiles then lortifled themselves and waged war against the troops. The ringleader of the revolters was hanged. TVLLL, BAFFLE BOOMERS. President HarrUon Instructs Army Offi- cials to Protect the Cherokee Strip from Contemplated Raid. WASHINGTON, March secret cir- cular has been issued by the Cherokee Strip Homesteaders' Association stating that concerted action by boomers to enter the strip will be made on April 22, and that it is believed that if tho move- ment assumes sufficient proportions the settlers will not be molested. The cir- cular having been called to the atten- tion of the authorities at Washington, the President has issued instructions that no matter what the "proportions of tho raid, the settlement of the strip will not bo allowed until it is made law- ful." The military will be directed to carry out these instructions. Knocked Out. XEW March James Connors, of the Buffalo Athletic Club, knocked or.t Tommy Danforth, of Har- lem, in twenty-four rounds at the Young Men's Gymnastic Club yesterday for a purse of D.inforth weighed 12-1 pounds. Connors -weighed three pounds less, but was an inch taller and had the longer reach. Danforth did most of the leading in the first part of the fight, and made vnry poor! straggle, showing a a tyrrific right and a i pxperiacss in durkinzr- the bj V.rrow tho Wreck. March 30. About o'clock yesterday afternoon the easi wall of the Becker block, adjoining the burned Brown-Merrill building, crashed down on .top of the ruins of Monday evening's flre. For a time the wildest rumors of disaster were afloat, but after a full investigation it was learned that but two men had been hurt, though many narrow escapes. Those in- jured were but slightly hurt. After the crash Mayor Sullivan in- spected the ruins and ordered that the front wall of the Bowen-Merrill build- ing be torn down. This was done, and a half hour later the Becker building, a narrow fonr-6tory structure, occupied by a notion store, fell down in a heap. Then the flames broke out again in the ruins and up to a late hour last night had not been wholly extinguished, though a flood of water was poured into the wreckage. There is no fear of further loss of life, though the three- story stone front building occupied by George W. Sloan, druggist, is regarded as unsafe and there are fears that the dry goods house of H. P. Wasson may also succumb. FALLED FOR A MILLION. One of the Lmrfent Dry Houses In New York an Assignment. NEW YOIIK, March John F. Plum- mer, Albert F. Plummer and W. U. Dar- ling, dealers in drv goods at No. 845 Broadway, made an assignment yester- day. Mr. John F. Plummer also made an individual assignment. The assignee, Mr. Murphy, is book-keeper for fiivu. He says tho liabilities are SI, 000 and assets nominally about the same, but their real value can not be stated until the schedules are prepared. The firm did a business of about a year. It was founded in 1856. It represents several large mills and also controlled tho Satinet mills, and Mr. Murphy says the trouble was caused by carrying too much satinet stock, and by the unfavorable winter for dress goods. Mr. Murphy scouts the idea that Mr. Plummer's political activ- ity had any bad effect upon the business. GAS EXPLOSIONS. Miners Killed and Injured While at Work In a Pennsylvania Colliery. WILKESBARKE, Pa., March While an engineering corps and a few laborers were at work in tho Midvalo colliery of the Lehigh company, near Mill creek, yesterday, a naked lamp carried by fire boss Patrick Hayes caused a severe ex- plosion of gas and the timbers caught fire. The fire -sttott-caused a-second and more severe explosion of gas, tearing nearly all the woodwork to pieces. Hayes was badly burned on the face and hands. Two engineers were knocked down but not seriously injured. William Jones, aged seventeen, was seriously hurt. After the fire had been extinguished a Hungarian, name unknown, was killed by after-damp and Thomas Devan suf- fered such severe injury from the samu cause that he is lying at the point of death. Items Gathered From Different Sections of the State. PJSCIPLISE. LEGISLATIVE DOINGS. Suicidnd At i% Birthday Party. AVoosTER, O., March Orrvillo on Tuesday night a birthday party was given at the home of Finley Caskey. Among those present were Robert Cas- key, aged twenty, and his sweetheart, Alice Hupp. During the evening Cas- key grew jealous of the attentions other young men were paying his affianced and they had some words. Robert then got a revolver and in his jealousy shot at his uncle, James Caskey, but the bul- let missed its mark. Robert then put the revolver to his forehead and sent the bullet into his brain. MEJTK-O. Man-h 20. The Association of funeral pas- sd Ticket Wednes- day aad a rote b'-Hoa tbe train: Derailed on Drawbridge- Mass., March engineer of a freight train on the Bos- ton Maine railroad yesterday, owing to the snow storm, did not see that tho gates on the drawbridge over the Merri- mac river were closed until nearly upon the bridge. He could not stop the train, owing to the slippery rails. Tho draw- tenders got the draw within three feet of the closing point, when the train came on and ran to the middle of the draw before stopping. The engine and a car were derailed, but no further dam- age resulted. Confident Victory. NEW Yor.K, March was nc change in the situation yesterday at the shirt-makors' headquarters. More con- tractors bare signed the agreement, but the number is not yet sufficient to de< clare strike off. The pants makers feel very confident that they will win tbeir Sjrht- They have wji marked in- dications that the remainder of tho s will surrender. Important BUU PMMd In the HOHM ol Senate, March Senate pnsaed Mr. Me- Maken's bill to prevent railroad accidents to the overworked condition of train men. The bill, which is a law. as fol'ows: "Any company operating a railroad over thirty miles iu length, in who e or in part, within thi State, shall not permit or require any conduc- tor, engineer, fireman or brakeman on any train who have worked in their respective capacities for twenty-four hours, to again be required to go on duty or perform any work, un- til they have had. at least, eight hours' rest. Twelve hours' labor shall conttltule a work, and for every hour that any conductor, engineer, fireman, brakeman or any train man ot a company who works under directions of a superior, or at the request of the company, ho ohal be paid for said extra services in addition to his per diem. Any company which violates, or permits to be violated, any of the provisions of the preceding section, or any officer, agent or employe who violates or permits to be vio- lated any of the provisions of the preceding sections, shall be fined not less than oce hun- dred dollars, nor more than one hundred and fifty dollars." Bills passed the Senate as fol- lows: Providing for the election of trustees- of civil townships in Section 16, school lands, on the first Monday In April; to authorize the con- veyance of a cemetery to Zion church trustees, of New Berlin, Stark County; to authorize the board of education of tho Wacisworth special school dis- trict in Medina County to Issue bonds for the purpose of heating the district school building; authorizing the trustees of Thompson township, Geauga Cornty, to transfer funds; making defi- nite the statutes and codifying the established practice with reference to the settlement ol de- ceased partners' estates: to authorize the Coun- cil of Canal Fulton to transfer funds; making the report of a special county treasury exam- iner nrima facie evidence in a court of justice; providing that a chattel mortgage may be reflled after the expiration of eae year; providing that in a suit over an agreement, to which an agent was a party, the other party shall not, in case of the death of the agent, testify, unless there present at the making of the agreement the principal on the other side, or another of his representatives who can testify; providing that a county prosecutor shall receive, for represent- ing the State in a civil action, such sums as the commissioners of his county shall find that his services have been worth. The Senate received the nomination by the Governor of Joseph P. Smith, of Pickaway County, as trus- tee o( the Columbus Asylum for the Insane. The nomination was confirmed. 1 bills were passed as follows: To make vaiil preferences given to one or more creditors by deb ors in contemplation of an as signment for the benefit of creditors, or when !D a condition of insolvency; giving to consoli- dated railroad companies the same rights as oth- er railroad companies with reference to issue of bonds; to provide for the erection of an asylum for epileptics. Bills were introduced as follows: Providing for the taxation of telegraph and ex- press companies; authorizing the trans'er of funds in Salem. Columbians County; giving justices of the peace final jurisdiction iu bawdy house oasf s. important bill was passed this morning, being the one introduced by Mr. Hearn to protect the minority stockholders in the proposed consolidation of the Pan Handle and railroad interests. Mr. Bel- ville introduced and moved a suspension of tho rules to pass a ill appropriating (311.40 to pay two months' salary and mileage to TV. A. Blair, of Adams County, who was deposed and his seat riven to Mr. Peterson. The bill passed with four neg-vtlve votes. Bills introduced: To au- thorize Milan. Erie Countv. to transfer ll.i'OO from the police and from the park to the light fund, and 850U to the general to increase the pav of the Franklin County in- Brmary directors from to Jl.OOO annually; to relieve executors and admin strators from responsibility in cnse or unclaimed money be- longing to the estate; to establish a non-parti- san police board for Cincinnati; to compel the slectrict light Cincinnati to put their wires under ground; amending Section 5242 by providing that where a party offers evi- ience of conversations, admissions or acts of in ogent ot the opposite r.arty, the latter may testify concerning the authority of such party; t wnship road iuw so as to give au- thority for the location of township roads to ;emeteries: amending Section 9 of the Dow law so that iu townships the money sball be paid to the township fund, as in corporations; LO proviso for paying trustees of county ehil- iren's homes Kl a day; to authorize the com- missioners of Pike county to levy.5-10 of a mill additional for general county purposes: to sub- mit to a vote of the people a proposition to Issue WO.OOO waterworks bonds at to iuthorl7.c the clrrk of the Supreme Court to ap- point two provide better security igainst railroad accidents by preventing the employment of anyone who is ir.toxlcated; unending Section 4yfr4 so as to regulate hauling n public roads, not more than 1.000 pounds to o hauled on wagons with three-Inch tire and SCO pounds on wagons with four-Inch tire and o limit wbea the ground is dry or frozen; to stablish a depository for school funds at Vkron: to provide for real estate valuations very fiye years; to provide for depositories for ounty funds by giving same to bank bidding ighest. but in no case shall it be less than two er cent.: to provide compensation formembers t county, city and State boards of equalization or for mortgaged se- urities given by a guardian to a minor in case nal settlement is made before minor attains is majority: to repeal the township local ption law. Bills pasucd: To authorize .erto isstic in bonds to prospect for aturaleas: authorizing the commissioners of .Jhampaiurn County to provide for improving "oads: the Councilor Wooster to ransfer from the newer to the seccrnl re the Board EotcrprUe froaa AlMMM Their Ofleen. NEW YORK, March When the Mc- Calla inquiry Case was resumed yester- day nearly half an hour was monoto- nously taken up by introducing a number of men who have already been heard, swear that their testimony as read, to them by the Judge' Advocate was rect Corporal Dean testified that when seaman Hening was in irons, he wished to be shaved, but the request was fused by the officer of the watch. man Hughes and Master-at- Arms Brooks gave testimony as to llening's treat- ment and condition while in confine- March Viv hstj--3r in :ijc- bolt .t aill -it work fttr-ltat: Mi Cwwrt. March Central. of the C5n- vice T the -VJO mcrrr. onit a T their A s.v-i.ti5a'- -n.- r.v" A tf m. 1- emotion fund and iatlOtothe street fnnd: ait- 'he board of education of Patterson school district. Hardin County, to levy a special AX of three nr.ils for school purposes: authortr.- jig the Council of Toledo to issue SW.OCW in to moot deficiencies in the sanitary fund. the board of education of Ottawa fpecial school district of Ottawa township. Pat- ain County, to increase toe ievj for school the Oiincil of Newark to 5su" SS.WJ in bonds to conjtrucl a main trunk ________________ in the Air. O.. March iivelj shooting affray took place Tuesday night it the r'-staurant of HalL Two characters. -T. Gorman and -Toss Mayo, ordered drinks and refused topay a a njTolTT ind shot Thi Hall. his r kslliuff of William Fitzgerald was the next wit- ness. He is about the only man as-to whose drunkenness at Cronstadtmoot ofi the previous witnesses had agreed. He, said that one morning while on deck; Mr. Ingersoll told him 'to get on his' feet. When he could not do so Mr. In-i gersoll pulled him upland then knocked him down. Charles the captain's, steward, saw strike Fitzger-' aid and afterward eaw Fitzgerald triced up. Seaman Hughes also saw the striking.______________ AN ARKANSAS TRAGEDY. A Deputy Sheriff Shot and Killed by Brace of Who Wound Two od Party Sent in Fumuit. MoKRiLt-TOX, Ark., Sheriff James, of this place, was mur- dered in cold blood at Germantown Monday night. He saw two men in camp near town and, believing they were wanted for a safe burglary at Dover, attempted to arrest them. He armed with a shotgun and had one at- tendant, who was unarmed. He invited tho men to a saloon and they accepted the invitation. While on the way they divined his purpose and shot and killed! him. They escaped, but were overtaken] by a posse, whom they beat off, after; wounding two men. They than escaped; to the swamps. Bloodhounds are nowi in pursuit.______________ Fatal Aflr.iy In School Koom. PAHKEUsr.UKfi. W. Va., March Perry Goff, ased sixteen, was stabbed) to death by Morgan Rose, a school teacher in the Beach Hill school Clay County, on Tuesday. Goff came tot school late and the teacher attempted! to correct him. Golf resisted and teacher knocked him down with a club.' Goff then left and returned shortly after with his father and two others. The, quarrel was resumed and Rose young Goff, killing him almost instantly.i A general free fight ensued, in the elder Goff, Rose and several others were injured. ___________ Dig; Advance in PiTTSBiTKCii, March used in thp manufacture of glass have advanced in price over 100 per cent, within a brief period, and the glass manufacturers say that it is impossible to get as much for their goods as they, cost to manufacture. These chemicals are mostly imported from Europe and the prolonged strike of stevedores at Liverpool and of men in chemical trades in other parts of Europe are said to ac-' count for the exorbitant prices. Rumors of an Indian MaMAcre. SILVER CITY, N. M., March named Carmichael, who arrived here on, the Coney stage, reports that seven per-- sons have been killed by the Indians on, the Little Bluo river, which is about! twenty miles from Alma. Thirty In- dians are reported out. The spot at which the killing is reported to have oc- curred is near to that where the first depredations of Geronimo's band "were committed in The story of tho killing has not thus far been confirmed.' Shot Ity n Yonnjt Tjtdr- PEEKSKILI- N. Y., March Lonsherry and Walter Scribner were to- gether in the woods near Wallace pond Tuesday afternoon, and under circum- stances not yet explained Miss Lonsber- rv shot Scribner over the right eye. He was seriously wounded and it is feared that be will die. He refuses to make any statement concerning the shooting. Miss Lonsberry is under surveillance. Will Employ Nmt-fnlon CHICAGO. March The Pbccnix cijtir will start np to-day with about 100 non-union men who are com- ing from Detroit. Milwaukee and points. The manager of the factory that he is to t-mploy nnion men, but, if the factory to rush mat- tors at anr time. was not jroin? tRcn 11 this union cxtuld not supply the demand. Will Ont of -_ K. T.. March a- f i li 24 ".U :f: 1 i   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication