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Salem Daily News: Wednesday, March 12, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - March 12, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE DAILY NEWS. NO-60. SALEM. OHIO, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12. 1890. TWO CENTS. FIFTY-FIRST CONGRESS. to Senate a Cause of th6 aster. 'ated Train Con- 11 Testimony lessness. Precautions ted In tbe Death ch court Iding, where was 3 six passengers the Bay View ac- ,-as crowded with fucker and Kem- heir seats yester- llan appeared for [tail road Commis- sent also. He is ration on his own >hn Houghtal- of the wrecked id principal wit- ictor on the Lake five said j.s running train to Buffalo. We ite leaving Cleve- pronounced all at Erie. All was [kirk. After oil- ve the signal to >er backed for a I start the train witness saw the ist tbe coupling. ht and he so re- an arranged the onnections where "Then the sie- en and the draw- Li right so far as spector (oilman) 1 him if he had he had and I sent e got back and to connect it, I ud: 'Never mind, ,h air-brakes and ight.'" 'hen the first cars ed with the air lied Houghtaling. be safe. We ran t stopping till the i felt the train 1 the bell cord of ord? ped immediately; hen I ran out and signalled with my he engineer to go They came to- h telescoping the the day coach went said Hough- n right in." The Houghtaling, will urself did not pull and apply the air- sir; I so swear. I nly. 't you let the man onnectiona at Dun- idy to do it? red that he consid- ly safe, and added lelayed us." w, after starting tick, what further ake beyond telling i had six cars with March Sen. ate yesterday debated at great length the reso- lution to correct tlie report in die Congression- al Becord of the speech made by Mr. Call oa the political assassinations in Florida. credentials of Mr. Allison for his new term were presented and filed. Mr. Call submitted some remarks in his own vindication, and quoted gome of Mr. Cbandler'8 expressions imputing to him the possibility of provoking bomieide and alluding to "the silent voters of and assuing the Senate that he had no idea of violating its rules. A vote was then tak''n on the resolution and re 27. vavs ouorutn. Without disposing of the "natter ne Senate adjourned. House passed the bills to pro- vide for the erection of putil'c buildings at the following points- Cedar R ipirts. la.; Chester, Pa.; Columbus, Ga Ateh son, Kan.: Alexan- dria, La.; Lynn, Jla-s.: La iveue, Ind Baton Rouge, La., and Fremont Xeb Also bills pro- viding for increase of the limit of cost of public buildings at Newark, X. J.: Seranton, Pa.; Troy, N. Y.; Dail-is Tex., Springfield, Mo. The measures passed mvoh an expenditure of Mr. Enloe, of Tenneste mo-. ed to the Committee '.n Icvalid Per s'ons from the further coi.siderat.on of.i oa the Secretary of 'or information re- lating to the ar'minibtttit on of the Pension Office under ex Cormrrss o ier Tamer, and what steps had been tak >u to recover money paid to pension ofllce employes who were Ille- gally rerated. Mr. MorriU, of the committee said he had never before heard of resolution and that the clerk of tho cimmutee said it had never been presented t him. In iew of these state- ments Mr. Euloemth Mr B iker, of New from the Committea on Territories, reported tho Sill for the admis- sion of Wyoming fonts immediate consideration. Mr. Su.mger ra'sed the ques- tion of co islderat on md otnywd it with a mo- tion to adjourn which was "defeated Fmallj the House took up tut bill in Cjmmiu.ee of the Whole and pending discu-siou the committee rose and the Housu adjourned. THE PLAYERS' LEAGUE. Proceedings of the Cleveland Couventloa of Brotherhood People. CLEVELAND, March ten o'clock yesterday vice president John Addison called the convention of the Players League to order, but at noon Colone McAlpin, of New York, president of tho League, arrived and took hold. After the opening of the meeting several im portant committee reports made and were approved, along with the re port of Secretary Brunell, who said tha he had signed contracts with eight um- pires. Mr. Brunell explained that h had chosen the umpires without previ ous sanction by the League, it being a case of emergency. The playing rules committee reporte upon a division of the prize fund as follows: First second third S3.500, fourth fifth sixth 5800, seventh SIOO. Tbe report was adopted and the League decided to purchase a handsome championship ban- ner to be presented to the champion New York club. An adjournment was then taken to three p. m.. when the schedule committee made its report. be Returned to the Annex. COLUMBUS, 0., March L. Sharkey, the Preble County murderer who was granted a new trial has again been convicted of murder in the first de- gree. He was taken back to Eaton from the penitentiaryannexabout Christmas. and by reason of a change of venue was tried at Hamilton. His mother was his victim. The crime was very brutal. It is believed that the act was committed because he feared she would disinherit him from a 125 acre farm. lie is about twenty-one years old and will be re- turned to the anne.t. Victim to Grim Destroyer. Io Ante-Mortem Taken i There Are Only Two of the Shooting-, )M of Whom Caa Not be Kx- ConcrMNimaa'a Put Bohlatf tlM of a Short but Eveatffel life. WASHTXGTOS, March P. Taulhee, a Representative in Congress torn the Tenth Kentucky district in the Forty-ninth and Fiftieth was shot in an altercation with Charles E. Kincaid, the Washington correspond- ent of the Louisville Times, in the House wing of the Capitol on February 28, died Tuesday morning at Provi- BCJftNED LIKE TESDEB. a HUM Block IB ClMiaMtl. With W. P. TAULBEE. precautions, kemen aware it way? that Well-Knovrn Chicago Millionaire Dies. CHICAGO, March T. Lester, the well-known Board of Trade opera- tor, died last night of heart failure, re- sulting from paresis, aged forty-seven yeats. All of his relatives were gath- ered around his bedside when he ex- i placed one brake- id one on the day tier, could the acci- ed? k so. id allowed the in- to put on the air- it have made -fe? ae train had broken all properly made )uld have stopped Mr. Hough talinjr." n conclusion, "that things which one. this accident that it ex- operation of tbe v- forward part of t-nd-jcvor Sailitrao, train, ran up to 'd ''t ibv will pired except his son, Charles H- Lester, who is lying ill with pneumonia Thomasville, Ga., and unable to corao home. Mr. Lester was a member of sev- eral Chicago and New York clubs and a director in tho Union National Bank. He leaves an estate valued at McCalla> Trial NEW YOKK, March naval court of inquiry to examine into tho charges made against Commander Mc- Calla, of the steamer Enterprise was opened at the Brooklyn navy yard Tues- day. After the court had organized the members went on board Enterprise and Admiral Kirnberly called all tho officers and crew who had to make to come forward. About a dozen men. stepped out of the ranks. The court then adjourned until V--dar. TXtcd. WASirrsoTOJf. March practira test of the fire alarm srstx-ai put into the White by iliary Alartn Conajiaar. York. IW.T in the of tb" the Iruttoa of the alarai Irvx and in f otsr IsiCu'-r iiad dence Hospital. His death has been ex- pected lor several days, but while there 'was still a chance for his life, physi- cians thought it ad- visable not to per- mit him to make an ante-mortem state- ment of the circumstances surrounding the shooting. He died therefore with- out making any statement, and the case against Kincaid will rest entirely on testimony of himself and two eye-wit- nesses of the tragedy. One of these was Samuel Donaldson, of Tennessee, for- merly doorkeeper of the House of Repre- sentatives, who has refused to make any statement for publication. Donaldson was with Taulbee at the time the shoot- ing occurred. The other witness was a Iwy who can not be found. The stories of the shooting differ in one important particular. Kincaid and Taulbee had had an encounter in the corridor adjoining the hall of the House of Representatives. It was said just after the shooting took place that Kin- caid had armed himself after the first encounter- with Taulbee, and, seeing him going down the stairs that lead to the basement, ran after him, called to im and, as he turned, shot him in the ice. Kincail claims that he armed imself in fear of danger from a further ncounter with Taulbee, that Taulbee ad warned him to arm himself and hat Taulbee insulted and attacked him n their second encounter, rendering in his opinion resort to the pistol a neces- ity. The theory of self defense will >e set up by Kincaid s lawyers. As soon as the news of Taulbee's .eath reached police headquarters an officer was sent to Kincaid's room and le was taken to the polico station, where he now is. Mr. Taulbee was eminent in debate 'or his fluency and vocal power, gifts which were aided in their effect by his uperior stature. Mr. Taulbee's home was at Saylorsville, Ky. He was born n Morgan County, that State, October and was educated in private country schools. The three years be- tween 1S75 and 1873 were spent by him :n preparation for the ministry; during ;he next three years he read law. His Irst election to Congress was in 1584. Ky., March Kohn, the noted criminal lawyer of this city, and Judge Hargis, the well-known jurist, have been engaged by Kincaid's Kentucky friends to defend him in his trial. March building on the toutheast corner of Third Vine streets owned and occu- pied by Stern, Mayer A Co., one of the wealthiest clothing manu- facturing firms in' this city, was com- pletely gutted by fire early Tuesday morning. The loss is estimated at 000; insurance The alarm was turned in a few minutes after one o'clock by private policeman who saw a glow in the third floor windows, but before the firemen reached the ground they round a red hot building confronting them. The place was completely en- closed by a network of telegraph wires, causing some delay in getting a stream to the places were it was most needed. Across the street the sudden bursting of flames, clanging of bells and shouts of firemen created consternation in the Burnet House, and hundreds of guests came pouring into the corridors seeking Took by Force. ST. Lotns. March Thomas, recently elected city marshal at a spe- cial election called by Mayor Noonan, on Tuesday took forcible possession of the marshal's office. The incumbent, Martin Neiser. was defeated at the reg- ular election, buthisopponent could not qualify owing to lefral disabilities. Neiser claims the special election not a legal one. and refused to vacate the office, appealing to the courts to sus- tain his position. Thomas concluded that possession was nine points ia the eyes Of tbe law aad took snap judgment and the office. nut Her March Nary Department is informed that the Iro- arrived at Port Townxend. Mondar. Cotniaaftder Kisbop that oa Op-oeaaber 33. while route to Samoa, an Uie wachMN-ry him to saiL He Uaca back to Honolulu, fesl an avenue of escape. Fireman White was thrown from a ladder by a falling cornice during the fire and badly in- jured. Engine No. 6, while en route to tbe fire, collided with a freight car. Tho driver, James Shepard, was thrown from his seat and sustained a fracture of the skull and several bad bruises. WIRE NAIL MILLS CLOSED. Ordered by Be- longing to the of the Move. O., March wire nail men of the United States, with few exceptions, have closed their mills and announce that they will not resume operations again until the 24th inst., but that they will open then is not cer- tain, as their object may not be accom- plished. This shut-down is, it is al- leged, part of a scheme to force certain manufacturers of wire nails into the trust which has been forming for some time, but which may fail on account 01 the refusal of the independent factories to join the combine. Heroic measures are now to bo attempted, and all the mills in the country to the trust shut down Monday, throwing thousands of men out of employment Both the mills in this city joined the movement._______________ INCREASING THEIR DEBT'. Stockholders of the Pennsylvania Railrom Company Tote to Issue 400.OOO Addl tional Shares. Piirr-ADELpiriA, March an nual meeting of the stockholders of the Pennsylvania railroad was held in Musi Pund Hall yesterday. Secretary r-Jid tho-a-anual report of. busi ness of the company during the past year. The following resolution was adopted: Resolved, That in view of the state- ment made in the annual report just presented, the stockholders hereby au- thorize the board of directors of the com- pany to issue from time to time additional shares of the capital stock of this company, tho said shares to be is- sued, apportioned and disposed of as the directors may deem for the best inter- ests of the company. Tried to Suicide in a Church. TOLEDO, O., March Hicks, aged sixty-five, agent for the Hunter Pants Company, attempted suicide in St. Paul's M. E. church Monday evening. After a social, which was being held in the church parlors, he went into the furnace room and turning on all the gas lay down to wait for the sleep of death, but was discovered before entirely over- come. Tuesday morning be disappeared and it is not known what has become of him and fears are expressed for his safety. He left a note which gave finan- cial troubles as a reason for his rash acL GRABBED THE SPARKLERS. of Worth A Budget of News Prom Towns in This State. TBDB LAW-GIVERS. Theft by a Who tUm Eaeape-nio oa the Trail. DALLAS, Tex., March of tnt boldest robberi es that ever occurred in this State took place Monday night at o'clock at COS Main street, fery heart of the city. Domnan A. Sam- to mn Election Riot. BrnnEFOTtn, Me., March the action brought against deputy sheriff Parker for assault on city marshal Tar- box on election day, counsel for de- fense yesterday ftntered a motion to nol pros and tho sheriff was discharged. for the prosecation gave noiico that be should take similar action in the i sbal Starkrole special deputy sher- iffs Small. Roemro and Minnehan. This will dispose of all caws ajrainut shcritls who were oa duty at the Uff Cfclttfreii Ga.. March Sarah a fujfitivr from justice. th" ttjeiuorr oard of three women to visit children's homes at least once in three months; amend ing Sec- ions 3187, 3169 and 3170 90 as to provide that the urviving partner may elect to take the assets and business of the partnership at its appraised value, and on his failure or neglect to do so the ommon pleas or probate court may appoint a eceiver to close up the affairs of the partner- hip. ________________ CONFESSEDjaiS CRIME. Story of the Accomplice of Daviney, the Burglar Who Was Killed by a Wear Creatline. O., March Sel- ers, of Loudonville, n ho was arrested at that place last Saturday as an ac- complice of George M. Daviney, tho Burglar who was shot and killed by farmer Justin F. Frengle near Crest- line, February 1G, has made a full and complete confession. Sellers, who is about twenty-fire years of ajjc. claims that hn met Da- tiney at Crestline, where ho went to visit his sister, and that be had never seen him before that day. Da-riney asked him if he did not want to make some money and then unfolded the plan to rob the Frengle house. After the at- tack and tbe killing of Daviney and tho wounding of tellers, the latter went to the borne of his sister, where his wound was drf ssed by himsvif. and he secured a bat and returned to Loudonrille on an early train. He related the same story in as told by rejzard- inp the the house and tho itrurjrle and the shooting by Fr'-nplc. ajrainst Sellers stronjr that a full confossion the bjtn. uels arc jew elera and keep a magnificent display of costly goods behind the ?lass of their lar ge show window. TpitV- in and without are electric lights, and the neig hborhood is kept almost as lighl as day. Mr. Domnan was wait- on a' customer he heard a terrific crash at the window and turned his eyes barely in time to see a tray of valuable diamo nds disappear. He run out in an instan t, but the thief had disappeared up the stairway at the side of his The break made with a rock weighing twenty pounds, wrapped ii paper. The tray contained forty-tw< diamond rings, valued at about So.OOO The man was a slender white man. After he ran up tho stairs in front was seen to descend to the street in rear and go out through the alley. sheriff and other officials with trainee bloodhounds are now on his trail. Trark O.. March 12. A land. Jk. 
                            

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