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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: March 8, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - March 8, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SALEM DAILY NEWS. NO. 57. SALEM. OHIO, MARCH 8. 1890. TWO CENTS. toaster on Railroad. FUtoea s Injured. CONGRESSIONAL. Day la Both of Uw Nation! WABHUOTOV, March resota- ttoa declaring Mr. Clark, of Alabama, entitled to his seal wag adopted yesterday and several OB the private calendar were disposed ot Seaate bill referring to the Conn of Ute claim of W. E. Woodbridge tor the use of Inventions of projectiles for nned cannon was March re- sday night's rail- yet been definitely >eem to agree that occupied when the B first breaking In rhe brakes were. They work auto- proper condition lelves in the sleep- away from the for- rain. Under those course was to stop ce. The questions t the coroner's in- know that the air ;hed section were id he stop the first Die for running the r the air brakes in interview conduc- erday morning, but ad just left Super- oald say nothing, w the superintend- 1 that Houghtaling about twenty-five egarded as a capa- .ent official, or instructions i an emergency as rht." into that e sleeping car con- in the back end of tat the coupling had intly pulled the air ind it hprt TIO effect ther cars with the as just in the act of nd-brakes when the The sections came force that the for- The bill directing the Secretary of the Treas- to pay to Albert H. Emery, ot Ooo- in settlement of big c'aici for the ttM ot the teatiag machine inrented by him, was taken up, but without action on the bill the Hoose o'clock took a recess till eight o'clock, the night to be for considera- tion ot private pension bills. The following public building bnis were Sterling, 111.. MO.OOO; Oakland. CaL, Cheyenne. AVyo liSO.OOO; Ches- ter, Pa 1100 000; Helena Mont., Tile bill appropriating for a building at Salt Lake City gave rise to debate, Mr Plumb desir- ing to the appropriation reduced to 000. The bill went over -and the Educational bill was taken up. In response to inquiries, Mr Blair said he oonld uol fi-e a dav for on tue bitt. Sev- Senators were still to spetik. among them who was to co icluie the debate. In the course of his remarks ,on the bill. Mr. Blair said thai any lon-rer dcmv in disposing of this matter would be unjustifiable and he would look upon it as a psrpetuj' of the effort to give national aid TO laa schools ot the country. Mr. Hale spoke in opposition to the bill. It had been before the fir eiiht years, and all the time there had been a ris.ug tide against it, Mr Blair would not admit this, and claimed that the bill had been constantly gaining strength among the people. M-. Blair replied to Mr. Hale s argument and aUa to Senators Spoouer and Plumb. After a short secret session the Senate ad' joumed until Monday. BIiOWN INTO Explosion hi a Furniture Factory Results In the Dentil of Three Boys. EVAXSVILLE. Ind., March A fear- ful explosion occurred in the dust room of the Armstrong Furniture Company yesterday afternoon, resulting in the death of three boys and the perhaps fatal injury of the firemau of the fac- tory. The man and boys were in the dust room for the purpose of shaking out the accumulation of dust and shav- ings at the mouth of the blow pipes, when a terrific explosion occurred which Bet the building on fire. The flames were extinguished without delay, when it was found that the following were killed and injured: Fred Sachs, burned to a crisp and ter- ribly mangled; Harry Cheatham (col burned almost to ashes; Crawford, badly mangled and bod burned so that idoitfifleation was nearl; impossible. Injured: Charles Shelby, fireman of No General Improvement Trade Is Noted. MoTemeut- lit Spring Staples Haa Bern Cheeked bj Cold Weather. UNDER AN AYAJLANCHE. Weaker Past aad it WU1 Conttnae to YORK, March tele- trams to Bradstreets report no general improvement in the distribution of mer- chandise. Cold weather and snow hare stimulated sales of some winter goods, but checked the movement in spring staples. Standard cotton goods have been fairly active, and boots and shoes and hardware have been in good re- quest. Other lines are dull. Ingrain earpet makers complain of over-produc- tion and will restrict the output. An- thracite coal stocks between mines, and tidewater are very large. There is a heavy southern demand for bacon, and cattle and hogs are both in better de- mand at the West, the former being 1S@ 20c higher. Low prices for grain at in- terior points and farmers' indebtedness are responsible for slow collections. Iron and steel markets are weaker than for some time past. This refers to pig and bar iron, billets, blooms and slabs. Prices for merchant steel and hardware are generally firm. Bessemer pig is weak and S3 below highest prices touched within a year. There is a wide- spread impression among consumers that iron and steel will continue to decline. Dry goods with jobbers are fairly active at Boston and New York. Weather con- ditions have not been altogether favor- able. Southern buyers are most nu- merous, and the Western retail demand is not as active as anticipated. Prices are irregular. Raw wool is dull, with prices in buyers' favor on a hand-to- mouth manufacturing demand. Business failures reported to Brad- street's number 215 in the United States this week, against 190 last week and 221 the same week last year. Canada had 48 this week, against 34 last week. To- tal number of failures in the United States since January 1 is against in 1SS9. na" telescoped the the factory, badly burned and leg broken. nding section, kill- d injuring fifteen piled in all shapes r. while the "Sali- pletely buried from escaped injury set Less fortunate, while shrieks of many of rere enough to make There were eleven and one of them, id porter, was hurled stance of thirty feet All the rest were were: John Flynn, raveling agent for city; JohnT. Power, (supposed) travel- Mrs. J. E. Stewart, Joseph D. Baucus, i, N. Y. terday morning the mght the bodies of the Central depot, :er, who had been no- litiug, at once took day afternoon made all the bruised and )od in the disaster. id about the city at the Iroquois Hotel The most severely "'itch Hospital. The say, however, that well as could be ere, of course, in too i state to talk. The a at the hospital who a Healy, of Boston, id shape. One side lashed, a rib and her The killed persons were boys aged about eighteen years The cause of the explosion remains a mystery. The dam- age by the fire was slight. Shaken as If by au Earthquake. WILKESBABHE, Pa., March 8 suburb of Plymouth known as Curry's Hill, was shaken up as if by an earth- quake at three o'clock Friday morning. Houses settled down about ten and the terrified people ran into tho streets clad in their night clothes as they had been aroused from sleep. The ca-ve-in was caused by tfie "falling of the roof of some abandoned colliery working some 450 feet below the surface. Seveaal houses were wracked and some took fire from overturned stoves, but the flames were extinguished. Pulled the Attorney General's Nose. BISMARCK, N. D., March sentative Walsh vigorously pulled At- torney General Goodwin's nose in one of the corridors of the Capitol Friday after- noon for having mentioned his name in connection with tho recent lottery scan- dal. Goodwin made no effort to retali- ate. There were reports that a duel will Caught by a Decoy Letter. GAMDEX, N. J., March W. Blank was committed to the county jail in default of S3.000 bail yesterday for robbing- the mails. Blank is a letter- carrier of this city. For some time past numerous complaints have been made to the postmaster of missing letters and the case was placed in Inspector Baird's hands. The latter mailed a decoy letter and when Blank was arrested the letter was found on his person. Other letters that he had abstracted were also found on him. Fears Foul Play. NEW'YORK, March of the firm of Zucher Josephy, of 553 Broadway, importers of millinery goods, employers of Roland Leach, the travel- ing salesman who mysteriously disap- peared in Chicago last Sunday, says he can not account for Mr. Leach's disap- pearance, as he was one of the most re- liable of their men. He believes that Leach has been killed for his money. Young Abraham Lincoln's Funeral. March funeral of Abraham Lincoln took place yesterday at the residence of the American Minis- Dnrra. CoL. March of greatest In the way of ft wowillAe occurred Wednesday night is what is Wall cut, OB the Hlffc line division of the South Park railroad. in which two paaaenger MM being wiped away. Passenger train geing west, was running intwosaotfoBS. The first section got stuck in the snow at Wall cut, it being drifted badly at that place, and section two, which was running a short distance behind, came up with its two powerf ul engines to pull out the first section. Roadmaster Dobins was standing in front of the head engine of the first sec- tion. He was superintending the work when an aTalanche of snow came down without warning upon the two trains, sweeping him away. He was completely coTered by the flying mass of snow and was carried a distance of seVeral thou- sand feet and entirely across the riTer and onto the Rio Grand tracks, where he managed to extricate himself with great difficulty. One of his knees was badly sprained, but otherwise he was not injured. The tremendous volume of snow piled itself entirely over the four en- gines, putting out their fires and also buried completely the mail car. The weight of the snow crushed in the front end of one of the mail cars, in which was Mail Agent George Roberts and Baggagemaster N. Mason, both of Den- ver. It took thirty minutes to extricate the two men, but neither was injured. Fireman Culbertson, of Denver, was badly scalded. _ ___ AN UP RISING FEARED. of Militia by Mon- tana Who Kxpect Trouble froM MISSOTJLA, Mont., March 8. A tele- gram has been sent to Governor Toole askinir that a detachment of militia be sent here. For some time the white residents of the Flathead Lake region have entertained fears that the rene- gade Indians of Chief Ignace's tribe would cause trouble, and within the last few weeks their fears have been Strengthened. The terrible slaughter of game in that section prompted the people to hold a meeting, at which it was decided to invoke the aid of the Government or take the law in their own hands. The Governor has as yet taken no action in the matter, as there are United States soldiers at Fort Mis- soula who could be called on in an emergency. _ __ Political Moves. EMPOBIA, Kan., March The plan adopted by the Farmers' Alliance and kindred organizations at their secret session here looks to the capture of the next Kansas Legislature by casting the united granger and labor vote for candi- dates acceptable to them who may be nominated by either of the old parties, s OF IB'am of Among Ohtoaiis, ASNEAK SHOTS GENERAL ASSEMBLY. Work te grow out of the affair, but it is not geu- I ter, most of the members of the Ameri- rt- Thn erally believed that the Attorney Gen- legion being present. nittnApniia to get even according to the attempt code. Sale of Valuable Trotters. NEW YORK, March A large num- ber of prominent horsemen attended the third day's sale of trotters at the American Institute yesterday. The stock sold was owned by G. Valensin, of Pleasantou, Cal., and the Pleasanton Stock Farm Company. The total re- ceived for twenty-five horses of the fef teve badlv I Pleasanton stock farm was an ts said thefthoutht of each: and the twenty hut that she would torses of G" an average of fe. jf Philadelphia, was Hospital. His right 1. When the doctors arm might possibly whether he could operation, he Said: in the most non- Xiaiick is now get- ably. sin? the crew of tho nained on duty until after having told officers under whose j next week. were- A little >n the cause of the ac- 2Tjd it be attached i forward part of the A State Without Money. K. I., March ac- tion of the House tabling the appro- priation bill because it contained a pro- vision for tho State Homo and School, superintendent is charged with cruelty to children, leaves the State without money for current expenses. Considerable embarrassment will result to courts and various institutions. Over JfiOO.OOO is involved in the deadlock and no further action can be taken until BAT.TIMOKK. March West Mr- Piltsbureh railroad, which is title given to ex-Senator Camden's new srsV-sn of for Virginia coai lands. of -54.000.000 at in favor of the Mercantile Tr-j--i Corapanr. ol Balti- A The floral numerous, the coffin be- ing completely hidden in a bank of flowers. The remains were conveyed to the catacombs in Kensal Green, where they will temporarily remain. Senatorial Farce Continued. WASHING T. OS, March its meet- ing yesterday the Dolph committee, in- vestigating executive leakage, deter- mined to call all of the Senators before it and ask them (under oath) whether they had ever revealed the confidential proceedings of the Senate. Mr. Aldrich was the first witness called. He took the required oath of purgation. All of the Senators will be sworn. No Bljc Appropriation Xeeded. WASOTNfiTOX, March Chicago representatives in the World's Fair mat- tor were before the sub-committee of the House Committee on the World's and discussed tho details They said that Chicago had a guarantee fund ot ready and no excessive Go femment appropriation such as had been reported was needed. to Oemth. PROYTOKNCK. R. I.. March day nijrht Ira S. Krown. aged sixty- seven, wa? burned to in a fire which destroyed the cottage of police- men Isaac Fairbrotber. in which he lived. ProTi teamed Fairbrother of the fire and helped him to save proper- ic lost bis own life in returning to own valuables. Frank ,and in case neither the Republican nor the- DemocratfrrHotntnee is.acceptable to the Alliance they propose-to place in nomination an independent candidate. Recovered the Stolen Boodle. DALLAS, Tex., March dent Fuller, of the Pacific Express Company, left here for St. Louis Thurs- day night with of the money recently stolen by F. A. Walton. Wal- ton's father and the superintendent re- covered the money from a disreputable house, where it had been left by Walton. All the money has now been recovered except Walton is still in Can- ada, and has made terms with the ex- press company. Out ft t. March WM a lazy day In the Senate and at noon that body adjourned until Monday. The Senate confirmed the nomination by the Governor of A. V. Rice, of Ottawa Coun- ty; Isaac B. Sherwood, of Stark, and J. O. Hartley, of Greece, as trustees of the Ohio Sol- and Sailors' Orphans' Home. Mr. Suttoa. Democrat, voted against the confirmation of the nominations. He had not been consulted in a nomiaation made In his own (Ottawa) county had been otherwise unfairly treated, he MM. were passed aa follows: To provide that a Mil of exceptions may he filed within thirty days after the close of the term of court in which the motion for a new trial has been decided; amending in minor the Cleve- land depository law; authorizing the commis- sioners of Cosbocton County to transfer to the road fund; authorizing the appointment tl m court stenographer hi Columbiana County. Henator Shaw Introduced a bill to provide that, when a municipality has purchased waterworks which were built by private enterprise, the works shall be governed by the rules and officers as govern waterworks bu'lt by munici- palities. The flag over the Senate was ordered placed at half-staff during the Pendleton oh were many absentees and but little business transacted to-day. A protest from the board of trade of this city against the passage of the Heffner bill creating a Board of Public Affairs for Columbus was presented by Speaker Hysell, and referred to the member from Franklin, who quietly threw it under his desk. The Heffner bill, incretsm? the pay of decennial land appraisers In Franklin County from 93 to 93 a day was taken up Mr. Griffin attempted to amend the bill so as to Include in provisions the counties ot Cuyahoga and Lucas, but the farmer members, who have formed an organization Independent of party affiliations to protect the agricultural interest, opposed the amendment and it was defeated. The opinion was expressed by Mr. Lay- tin, of Huron, and Taylor, of Champaign, that the bill was unconstitutional. The farmer mem- bers would not vote to allow the bill for Frank- lin County to pass on the ground that it was letting a dangerous precedent, and for fear they would not be as'.ccd to pass a similar bill for other counties it was 24. nays 40. A resolution ordering the flags on the Capitol at half-mast in respect to the memory or the late Hon. George H. Pendleton was adopted. Chief Clerk Fisher was empowered to employ additional cleiical assistance. Mr. McCoy's bill to submit to a vote of the people a proposition to release the bondsmen of Abel Lodge, late treasurer of New Lisbon. Columbiaua County, was passed and the House adjourned until Mon- day afternoon._________________ Will Stimulate the Oil Trade. FnnxLAT, O., March is much satisfaction among the oil men of this city and vicinity over the advance in the price of oil, which was authorized by the Standard Oil Company Thursday. This advance of five cents per barrel means a wonderful activity in the oil regions of Northwestern Ohio. The de- velopment from this time on will be something marvelous and far in excess of any thing which this part of the State has yet experienced. Twenty cent oil means millions of dollars in this region, and the excitement in consequence is unprecedented. She Came to Life Again. SiDjfZY, O., March Peis- ter, a middle-aged lady who lives with Joseph Spraull and his family, was taken sick and had to have a doctor. The physician left her resting comfort- ably, but in a short time her relatives were summoned with the intelligence that the lady was dead. "The assembled. While talking over, the ap- parent sudden death the woman showed signs of life, and in A fow moments, much to the amazement of the friends, she spoke. She is now out of danger. More Startling than Sensible. ATLASTA, Ga., March 8. President Livingstone, of the Farmers' Alliance, who is a candidate lor Governor, puts himself on a novel and startling plat- form. He proposes that all candidates for Congress be required to pledge them- selves in favor of putting crops in bond, the Government advancing eighty per cent of their value. He also advocates the governmental control of all rail- roads. _ Fell from Grace. NEW YORK, March 8. Letter carrier Samuel Cross, of Brooklyn, was arrested Thursday with a stolen decoy letter in his pocket. Much money has been missed along his route. He is a member of the Talmage congregation, a teacher in the Tabernacle Sunday-school, an usher in the church and was formerly secretary of the Young People's Associ- ation. ___ _ A Sweeping Challenge. SAW FAXCISCO. March Billy Ma- han, the coast champion lightweight, has published a challenge to fight any man in the world of from 133 to 1 pounds' weight, Danny Xeedbam, of St. Paul, preferred, for a reasonable pnrso offered by any club in the United He is also willing to wager any sum from to on the fight. HL, March 8. At Thursday's session of the State miners' convention the consolidation of their organization with the Knights of Labor was ratified and it was to a tax of ten capita per month to the present association and carrr on a aoT-eioeat to perfect aa. gaakation ia tbe March Collier, wbo -was declared insane ttcr ar.d to the was and to hs aad brracinj To rr. if tb" SM "Si'3'% SJsat 4: saita Politician Shot. HAMTLTOX, 0., March George Hard- ing, ex-captain of police here, shot Michael Regan, a local politician, at the Cincinnati, Dayton passen- ger station Thursday night. The shoot- ng was provoked by Regan, who struck larding in the face without cause and mmediately commenced blazing away at him without effect. Harding, in self- defense, fired two shots, the last taking effect in abdomen, inflicting what is thought to be a mortal wound. Ex-Treasnrer Sentence. March At Lebanon, O., Thursday, ex-treasurer Coleman, who had been convicted of embejzle- ment, the amount being fixed at was sentenced to pay double the amount embezzled, the costs of prosecution, and to be imprisoned in the penitentiary two and one-half years. Coleman's family is one of the most wealthy and respecta- ble in the place, and they are heart- broken. _ _ Another Freight Car In Hoc. LIMA, O., March 8. Joseph Jones, an- other of the Spencerville gang of freight car robbers on the Cincinnati. Jackson A Mackinaw. Chicago Atlantic and Clover Leaf roads, was arrested at Del- phos and brought to this city and lodged in jail. Several nights ago several at Paulding were broken into and robbed, and the thieves traced to Del- phos and arrested, when Jones was iden- tified. _ Found Dead In a Potato Tit. SPRINGFIELD. O-. March 8. JamesMc- Keevcr, a fanner, aged thirty-five years. residing at this county, was found dead by his widowed mother Thursday afternoon, buried in a potato pit near bis home. The deceased bad been missing since Tocs3a- morning. His body was roniplelcly covered with that jrave war. JTow ho came IO in the is -ot CHICAGO. March Kane, a perate young last nifht shot police officer Linville ia the Fifth National pawnshop at Iflo Clark and after hin ram amok through Clark and State atraeta, ahoot> ing Charles Cole, a printer, in the clea of the right arm, and ottoer S. F. in the breaat and abdomen, latter being mortally wounded. young desperado was finally captured by officer Xorcher after a hard cbaM and when Kane had entirely emptied hla -revolver. A great proceed around the officer and his captive and cried for immediate and summary geance, but a number of policemen came to the assistance of Norcher and landed Kane in the Central station. Officer Briscow can survive but a few hours. Officer Linville is not danger- ously injured, but he was shot twice in the face and will be frightfully disfig- ured all his life. Cole sustained only a flesh wound, which is not at all serious. Officer Linville was about to arrest Kane for the theft of worth of diamonds when the young thief suddenly fired the two shots at him at close range and then ran. ______________ BOWMAN DEPOSED. MethodUt Btuhop Found Guilty of Misconduct and Suspended from OIHco. CHICAGO, March conference which has been trying Bishop Bowman, of the Methodist Episcopal church, on charges .of un-christian conduct, telling numerous and broad falsehoods against Church members and using un-christiau expressions while conversing on relig- ious subjects, rendered a verdict yester- day, finding Bishop Bowman guilty and deposing him from his office as Bishop and from the ministry, until the next general conference. The charge of "un- christian conduct'' consisted of numer- ous alleged slanderous assertions againat his fellow ministers. In one particular instance Bishop Bowman was said to have characterized Rev. H. B. Hartzler, president of Moody's College at North- field. Mass., as '-a vile and Godless man." ______________; Chinese Not Allowed to Land. WASHINGTON, March 3. Assistant Secretary Tichenor has directed the col- lector at Port Townsend, Wash., not to permit the landing of a Chinese steward and cook who shipped at Shanghai on' the American, bark Gerard C. Toney, which vessel has just arrived at Port( Townsend. The department holds that while there appears to be nothing in: the Chinese Exclusion act prohibiting! the hiring of Chinamen on American vessels at foreign ports, proper precau- tions must be taken to prevent their landing._______________ i A Retaliatory Cat In Kates. CHICAGO, March Rock Island road yesterday announced that, com- mencing Monday morning, it would sell tickets from Kansas City, Leavenworth, St. Joseph, and Atchison, to Pueblo, Col., Colorado Springs or Denver at first class. This is a cut of nearly one-half, the regular rate being and is made in retaliation for the Missouri Pa- cific's cut from S18.15 to 810 on business from Kansas City to Pueblo. Strike Threatened. CFTICA.OO, March strike is threat- ened among the switchmen on the North- western railroad, in the Chicago yards. The trouble commenced some time ago when one of their number was promoted to yardmaster and left the union. Since that time there has been bad feelingbe- twen the yardmaster and his men. The trouble has continued to expand and every little provocation has tended to widen the breach. Expelled tu? NEW YORK, March H. Via Tassel, secretary of insurance in Vander- bilt division No. 145, Brotherhood of Lo- comotive Engineers, has been expelled from the order because he embezzled most of which should have gone to the families of engineers engaged in the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy strike._______________ Uave Over to the Church. DATTOX, O., March Sarah Shisler, of Orrvilie, O., has given to the Dnited Brethren church, the in- come from which is immediately availa- ble, the principal to go to the church at her death without conditions. Mrs. Shisler also gives in cash 51.500. An Old Anniremwry. BAi.TrMor.E. March Elizabeth Sands, .widow of one of the "old defend- celebrated her lOlat birthday yes- terday. The old lady is still vigorous and her memory filloi with events of the davs long (jonc by. A largj number of visitors oil led upon Gregor, died Friday O.. March J. 0 Mc- c Cleric of Hcruse, Tae previous of bis death was iaoor- a o of Mc- foe twe wMI t roar March The Kansas City team beat the Chicagos by four birds fa the shooting contest taking place Thurs- day and Friday at Watson's Park. Grand Cro-winr. Th? score was 430 to 416- One thousand birds shot at from ground Henry Kleiaman. of Chicago, the score of the contest and a gold A n-inrn con- twt will take place at Kansas _ Cirr. Ia_ March of Spirit Lake. yotsar dawrt- m r s m mi 1 JET "h i H f T i w   

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