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Salem Daily News: Friday, March 7, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - March 7, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SAI.EM DAILY NEWS. NO. 56. SALEM. OHIO, FRIDAY, MARCH 7. 1890. TWO CEN on tbe IAke reakjgiB Two tad no Together fie Crash. nons Were Killed If to the Seene. on the Lake >re from the west two one mile west n miles from this two sections came i wreck resulted, eral persons were tly how many can 1. An engine has e of the wreck, lost an arm. He under the influ- particulars could the train, consist- Iman cars, came speed and dashed oach. The coach .he greater weight lies on top of the ins telescoped the day coaches were 1 the loss of lifo very large. Ten illed outright, and nany are injured. r sent a train out ms and wreckers, jporters on board. 1 himself in as an learned ten were ye injured. The r as can be ascer- aeger, Rochester; vtoD Falls, Mass.; leg sprained and Thomas A. Hall, ut; P. C. Coombs, chin cut and both Halev, Boston, cut e and head; George tie sprained; J. D. the man not iliy- tie side of the track upon the terrible jays the coupling ke precisely in the rain was leaving lief train was made t seriously injurec Fitch Institute at portion of the conductor Hough- s bell rope Most t day coach wera in time to leave the first Pullman car d were in the car e coach and was er. J. E. Minnie t off, was placet started at once for f. It was two hours sicians arrived, but ne sooner and be- cating the victims. were placed in them was that o rter. airport, who man- e relief train, say s behind time am with the brakes. n came to a sndde later there was a sleepers had n the rest of the ed into the day :ompletely- There people in the day I says he can no -ve escaped nnin >ff jtist before th as he knows, th L_____ Lsvdy. March a Thursda- and Is wSthdrawn a rxwi CANNON AND MIIXCKEN Houe of by i AfrararoK, Much In the Icraae yesterday petitions were presented by t_u Women's Industrial League for representatior the World's Fair Commission aad from rail ployee asking for increase of way B The House then, la Committee of the Whole, proceeded to the consideration or public bmiM inc bills. A bill appropriating tor a pobliO ildtac at San Jose, Cal wai attacked vigor- oualy by Mr. Cannon, of HUnois, during which critieiMd the of the Committee on >ublic Buildings and alluded to the in the pot Mr. M of Maine, enairman of the committee, sal 1 that if it were not for big friendly feeling toward Mr. Cannon he would luprgest that he hal never seen a man attempt o Impute to another man that he had "pork In he pot" who was not the first fellow to get land into the pot. Mr Cannon said he had criticised the com- mittee. not the j or its chairman, and, le added, walking down toward Mr. Milllken: If the gentleman in zeal sought by nBuen- to, or by int mation to Allege that, if ii had not >een for hit> friendly relations with me he could urge aught against mv character or otherwise, tere and now let us have it, Seth Miluk n As Mr. Cannon yttered these words he slowly approached Mr Jailliken and tappsd hun on the shoulder This raised a laugh all over the louse. Throughout the colloquy both gentle- eu manifested a good deal of excitement, but he House the contrcn ersj hica was ended by Mr M'ili cen A scluirainR any inten- ion to insinuate aavthing nvt Cannon After funherdeba'e the Sa i bill was laid aside favorably and the cornii! ris.ng, it rod the preceding roponcd to the louse Mr Cannon iraae a vgoruus flgbt against he Washington office bill, moving ad- ourn, amid cries "dilator? motion" from the Democrats, and raising the ro.nt of no quorum amid shouts Jf fro-n the same source. The Speaker counted a quorum and the bill was passed. The Hoube then odsourned. SEN After routine bus ness the Senate ook up the calendar atH passed two pension granting montli to the daughter >f General W. G Worth and one mere isinsr to 1100 a month the pension or ihe wt low of Major General G K. Warren. At 12 '40 the Senate into secret se-s-on and at 5.10 p m when .he doors were adjourned HOLZHAY'S LATEST BUEAK. Phe Notorious Train Kobber Holds a PrUon Warden at Biy for Hoars, bat lm Finally and Wounded. MAjRQtTETTE, Mica., March 7. Kein- mund Holzhay, the notorious train rob- and murderer, was shot in the right land yesterday by Warden the bullet from the warden's rifle tear- ing away all four in an attempt bo disarm the desperado of a knife that he had taken secretly from the tabla and ground to a sharp point by rubbing on the cell floor, lie was suspected o) planaing an outbreak and a keeper went to his cell to search him. The convict seued the keeper about the neck and a knife at his throat for some time, and for two hours kept the keeper and a fellow convict between himself and an armed guard standing outside the cell door. Finally his atten- tion was distracted for an instant and warden Tompkins planted a bullet di rectly through the knuckles of Holz- hay's hand, which was Still grasping knife Holzhay coolly exclaimed "Well, you've done and thensnrrenderedtc have his wounded hand d esa VICTIM OF OVERWORK. Not to on Correspondents For Giving the Secrets of Ex- ecutive 1 ber becaaae irfth AflT two Twenty Tears' Labor Without Tacatlon Proven Too Much for an Man and He Suicides. MILWAUKEE, March 7. -William H. Farnham, secretary of the Northwest Mutual Life Insurance Company, com- mitted suicide yesterday by shooting himself with a revolver. The tragedy took place at the company's headquar- ters. The bullet which caused his death lodged just beneath his heart. He has been in the employ of the company foi twenty years, and during that time has not taken one vacation. T. E. Baldwin, assistant secretary of the finance committee, states that there is not the slightest ground to believe that Mr. Farnham ie short in his ac- counts. Deceased leaves a widow and one son. Nervous derangement brought on by overwork is ascribed as the cause. GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN. Reward Offered by the LoaterlUe City Bank for the Arrest of Its De- fitnUlnt; Teller. LOUISVILLE. Ky., March 7. The Louisville City National Bank has of- fered a reward of for the detention of William Pope, the defaulting teller. and ten per cent, of all the money re- covered. and agrees to pay for any in- formation that may serve to throw any light upon bis whereabouts. The bank will to ihe fullest ex- tent of the law if can If has to Canada aay hajw be his case larceny. The sVoicn asoncy ot jrrerabacks of Tarionndejionjinatioas. in- Cindimp SLOW. 51OO and MlK Nothiar v> Tar la throw tok-n by Another Debate OB the Question Shews a Marked Lack of Unanimity of Thought Purpose. March after the morning business Thursday the Senate went into secret session to consider the question of imprisoning the newspaper men who have been guilty of publishing the business of the Senate in executive session, and of re- fusing to tell where the news was ob- tained. The discussion turned to the constitutional phase of the question and for a long time the Senators debated whether, under the Constitution, they had a right to imprison the newspaper correspondents. Every Senator who has any knowledge of constitutional law spoke at some length. The question of the definition of "sedition" having raised, a copy of Webster's Dictionary was obtained and the definition there given was read and commented upon at some length. Among the orators of the afternoon were Senators Edmunds, Allison, Plumb, Faulkner and Dolph. Mr. Dolph read to the Senate a paragraph from Wednes- day's Washington Star, as follows: "The Senate 'smelling' committee was not in session to-day. The Senate itself is sap- posed to be maturing a plan to close the mouths of journalistic lions who are en- deavoring, with a good deal of success, to tear the entrails out of secret ses- sions. It is probable that the business, or fun, or whatever else it is, may be taken up to-morrow-, but to-day nothing will be done because Senator Dolph, who is chief of the ia giving a Salmon lunch in the restaurant." This paragraph, Mr. Dolph said, was written by a man who enjoyed the privi leges of the press gallery. He thought it was an outrage that a man who was granted special privileges by the Senate should be allowed to abuse one of its members in this way. the course of his talk to the Senate, Mr. Edmunds proposed that the old remedy be applied in this all the Senators ajif employes of the Senate take an oath of purgation to re- lieve them of all suspicion for what had been done in the past, and that the mat- ter be closed with that. Mr. Ingalls laid before the Senate a proposition that a committee be appointed to confer with the press committee. Ho thought the rules of the press galleryshould provide that any man admitted to its privileges who published what purported to be a report of the proceedings in executive sessions should be expelled. Mr. In galls' proposition did not meet with much favor and both the Ingalls and Ed- munds propositions were laid aside The Senate then adjourned, with the understanding that the matter would be disposed of to-day. x. Tbe fall Mystorlotu Murder Cleared Up After Twenty-four Sensation Created by the Story of a Crine Perpetrated in a Penn- sylvania Tillage. CUUen DahwrdwM His Mlad ol TerrinU Secret and Acknowledges FhyaMM. NORBISTOWX, Pa., March mys- tery surrounding the killing of Dr. Joseph H. Levering, of Lower Merlon, twenty-four years ago, has been cleared up by the death bed confession of John G. Henderson, who died at this place Tuesday evening. February 18, 18W, Dr. Levering was ia the act of putting away his team for the night, and while going out of the stable the report of a gun was heard from behind a stone wall within ten feet of the door in which the doctor stood. The doctor's residence was close to Henderson's store, between the villages of Rosemont and Whitehall. The unusual report of a gun within the yard of the dwelling aroused the family and the lifeless body was found two minutes after the shooting. Alarm and exitement drew a large crowd that evening and every house- holder joined in scouring the neighbor- hood for the assassin, Henderson assist- ing his neighbors. An inquest was held, but without result The excite- ment occasioned by the shooting was slow to die out. Ths leading citizens of the locality, including Henderson, is- sued circulars offering a reward of for the apprehension of the murderer. Last Tuesday, Henderson being sick and fearing that he was to die, called his family to his bedside and in the presence of the family physician con- fessed to killing Dr. Levering in cold blood. He described the tragedy mi- nutely. Henderson expired a little be- fore midnight. He gave no reason for his bloody deed and the confession has caused as much of an excitement as did the crime itself. IMPORTING CHINAMEN. An TJsvderfrottMd ny Which Enter the Calted of the SB CANNIBALISM. Destitute Indians In the Northwest Are Eating: Each Other. WnrrapEG, March gentleman who has just returned from the Peace river Indian reservation brings fright f ul stories of starvation and destitution among the Indians there, and states that if the government does not take action to relieve them the whole band will be exterminated. All of them are so much reduced physically that they are unable to hunt, and are resorting to cannibal- ism. He had heard of only two or three cases of that horrible nature when he left, but feared that many more might have occurred by this time Influenza has also played sad havoc among them. Liquor CSIVUMW a Tragedy. Prtti.ADKi.rniA. March morning Dominick Taney killed his brother Michael by -tabbing him with a sharp case-knife. Tbe tragedy occurred in a house in the rear of No. 1159 South Ninth street, where tbe brothers lived with their stepmother. Doaalnick. while cnder the infiaenee of liqsor. came into the and began q, Barreling with his On being improved by Michael he became infuriated and. up a table-knife. and until he fell dead. Dom- tnick under arrest. STARVING IMMIGRANTS. Pitiable Condition of a Party ot Swedes Hungarians Who Expected to Find n Fortune In Kansas. PITTSBUKOH, March penni- less pauper and had been induced to come to this country by false represen- tations, arrived in this city Thursday. They arrived in a Bremen steamer at New York Wednesday and were en route to Kansas City. They were sup- with breakfast at tne .Union sta- tion and devoured the eatables as if starving They claim that the agent who induced them to come to America told them that farms awaited them in Kansas, and that all they would have to do on reaching their destination would be to present their claim and take pos- session. They are without money, poor- ly clad and presented a pitiable sight. The party left for their destination via the Pittsburgh, Ft, Wayne   m He with haft Bad that h bad weeks throughout the South, especially in Kentucky. Tennessee and Alabama, have caused high water in all of tbe streams and rivers and considerable damage by overflows and backwater. The lower portson of this is sub- merged. forcinp many prople to vacate their homes. The tbe Tennessee at Jacksonville by the KashTillf A. rha.tanooga road occa- sioned only to through travel. Omat4, March 6.-Bills passed as follows: To a-ftborUe the trustees ot Moatvtlle township, toeuga County, to purchase land tor a township cemetery; to authorize the city of Cleveland to sorrow and open a street and drain Wat werth no alley. to authorize the electora ot he Tillage of to vote on proposition bore for natural gas: to anthome the- of Van Wert to issue 000 bonds to splete a waterworks system; to authorize City Council of to borrow for ore department purposes; to authorize the village Council of Port Clin- ton. Ottawa County, to transfer funds; tbe commissioners of Lora-n Coua- to refund money collected on a forfeited re- mynUance; extending the provisions of the Ldair liquor law to tne inmates of the Ohio Sel- lers' and Sailors' Howe at Sandusky and the rational Soldiers' and Sailors' Home at Day- Ion. Senators Cole and Kerr, of the special eommittee appointed to investigate the matter of the forged telegram sent to Senator Schnel- ter January W, for tlie purpose of drawing him away from Columbus aad thus break the tte vote between the Democrats and B the Marquis-Lampson contest, reported ttiat hey could not connect any one with a guilty knowledge of the forgerv unless it might B. Ratterman, of Cinc'nnatt The report was laid on the table and ordered printed. passed: To amend the semi- monthly payment law by striking out the c'ause- requiring the State Shop Inspector to investi- gate charges of violation on request ol their employes, the object being to make payment obligatory under the act: author zing boards of education in townships to employ teach >rs of rooal music. Mr. Pudney, of Cuyahoga, offered he following: Be it resolved by tbe General Assembly that the Governor is hereby author- zed aad required by and with the consent of he Senate, to appoint five commissioners, Dot than three of whom sha'l belong to the same political party, to revise, codify and ooo- tolldate the general municipal statute laws of he State which may be in force at the time suoh commissioners shall make their report, and in case a vacancy shall occur in said com- ilaslon by reason of death or resignation thtt Governor is hereby authorized to nil said cancy________________ BANK WKECKE1C HARPER. Application for His Pardon Sent to Presl. dent Harrison. COLUMBUS. O., March L. Harper, the noted bank wrecker, has been re- oommendfMl by the hoard of managers of the Ohio penitentiary for pardon. The recommendation, with a full tory of the case and the grounds for tbe> action, has been prepared and will be forwarded to President Harrison at once. Sarper was vice president of the Fidel- .ty National Bank, and lost the money of the concern in Chicago wheat deals. Be was received at the penitentiary December 12. 1887, on a ten-years' sen- tence. With the good time which be> jaa gained and will continue to gain he will have only a little more thaa four rears more to serve. Newton Falls Visited by Fire. NEWTOX FAIXS, O., March ihree o'clock Thursday morning fire iroke out in a building owned by Mrs. Electa Johnson and occupied by Millenger as a millinery store. The Building and stock are an entire loss. Loss on building, insurance, Loss on goods, S300; no insurance. The building of C. Oeoppinge, occupied him as a meat market and dwelling, was also destroyed. Loan, insur- ance, Origin of fire unknown. Convention of Ulswe CLEVELAND, March convention. of glass manufacturers of Pittsbngh and. the West was held at the Weddell House Thursday. The meeting was a Tery arge one. The sole object in calling- the meeting was to adopt a scale of prices whereby the glass can make more money, and although tht> meeting was extremely private it waft learned from one of the men who at- tended that the object was accomplished. Woold-ke Train Failed. 0., March rnyft- of the numerous attempts to wreck trains on the in this vicinity been cleared at last. Detectives been working on the case for some time, and their efforts resulted in the arrant of George Esterly at this plaoe yesterday morning. Esterly broke down and oonfeMed, implicating one Jordan. The object of their desperate attempts he refused to five. ATV.KX. L T.. March wf Nation. by the ha One tbe Tor the of a a certain foinj: w O., March a Ia4y named. Alexander, aocom- by her danchter. became vio- IMMSW the exprees rmabnrfh. Ft. TTajiw Chi- She was witto own plaoed in ebarfe a phynician of tk-s city. vf the is- Maltj tsi not known. bound far TjrrwM. Pa. Itof waft placi-n. trahM aj-> hr of tin- track an Soar. t trmnv rsmartrr havr Clar aad flar. It _s IT s.o I'-i III' fr.y I I tr -f J t f -1   

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