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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - February 28, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE DAILY ffO.50. SALEM. OHIO. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 28. 1890. TWO CENTS. ALMOST ASSASSINATED. nent PhyslcUiu of e Ohio Rirci ing. nati Flooded by uenred. imenU Compelled ;e of the Inooda. rom Their -The river con- At eleven o'clock d fifty-four feet Z all the railroad itral station to a teen inches. Two a suspension of .ainbow and Bos- its, are tied up at 3 to get under the U- P. Schenck the suspension ndon her trip to ents on Water, sets are flooded, almost entirely hat have hereto- ie cellars. The filling up rapid- ten feet from the nd the railroad nt the tracks are the water is not the fires of the s in the commis- street moved out 1 many others in g preparations to i inundated the pipe works and at Newport, and mills have been ton the overflow the .board walk Front street bridge is impas- -apidly reaching alsh's distillery., jray's old glass ;r is rising two le bottom lands iy families havo ,ve their homes. and privation fcs. the river is At Maysville, flooded and the ties an hour. Ohio river had hes and was still more inches wiJl abandon all trains Central sta- T from the Ohio street sewer has t several points, airrenceburg anft id Big Four trains 1ENEWJED. of Rival Kansas A Battle in Murder Promi- Culuuibus, O., in COLUMBXTS. O., Feb. eleven o'clock last night a desperate attempt -was made to assassinate Or. Alex Neil, one of the leading physicians and best known men of this city. An unknown man called at the doctor's residence and rang the belL The doctor, suffering from influenza, went to the door and asked what was wanted. The man said he wanted tho doctor to go and attend his sick wife. The doctor then asked the man who ho was and where he lived. The visitor answered that his name was Corbin, and that he lived on East Good- ale street. The doctor said he was too ill to go out, but would fix him some powders. He did so and opened the door a few inches to hand them out, when the man burst into the hall, drew his re- volver, placed it against the doctor's head and said: "I'll kill at the same time pulling the trigger, but it failed to go off, and the doctor immediately grabbed the man. After a desperate struggle the doctor succeeded in taking the revolver away from the assassin, whereupon he ran out. The family, with the doctor, then, went up stairs and directly the man came back aiitl smashed in several windows with bouldars. The doctor's daughter ran to the telephone and called up police headquarters. A patrol wagon was sent to the residence and a guard placed at the house. It is thought to be a bold attempt at assassination or to murder the doctor for money. The object was to get the doctor out on an errand of mercy, like Dr. Cronin's case, when the unknown man, with other confederates noa-- and in hiding, would pounce on and kill him. AN U.XI7UCKY VOYAGE. Vessel Detained at Quarantine Which Said to Have Yellow Fever on Board. NEW YOKK, Fob. schooner A. M. Brundeet, of St. Johns, N. F. sailed from that port thirty days ago from Barcelona, She came into port yesterday and is anchored of quarantine. It is said by the health au thorities that she has yellow feve aboard. On Februaiy 1, when th r Tom Bold and two men who led re-gory. The citi- I to- protect them After the firing1 :.hai Ailenworth I'.-.ld. Sve other :r Cimarron men The latter e. but more- blood- (Talc. Fob. aisunjud an A ipany been of tho old 700 men at aJwvjt COO po- r. v-ar within the 1.000 STEEL WIRE TRUST. to Form a Combination of 3Iantt- facturers Prove Unavailing-. PrtTSBtTRGH, Feb. months ago the steel wire manufacturers of the United States attempted to organize un- der the name of the Federal Steel Com pany. The attempt to form a steel wire trust at that time (such was the object of the proved a failure. Representatives of the wire manufac- turers have been in this city since Tues- day. Several meetings have been held with an object similar to the above in view. No satisfactory conclusion was arrived at and the tnanusVcturers again abandoned the idea of a national organ- ization and will continue to compete ia open market. Train Wrecked With Kwtal Kesnlts- Ewsrx- HI- Feb. Milwaukee St. Paul freight collided with a stock train at Salt Creek yesterday. Twelve cars of the stock train were demolished much stock killed, two persons fatally injured and two badly hurt. The victims were: Fireman Oirden. Chicago fatally injured: Alexander, fa tally Patsy Kyan. seriously hurt: Henry Algcr. badly injured. Alex ander. Ryan and Aljrcr were boys who had run awav from home in Koloit Wis.. and were in a stock car Snicide of Kmlmzler. rVti. dead body of Wiliianj Schumacher was found in a in last niphi. was fo-Jnci lyinff at his side an wound in hi< Fleeing From the Floods. CAJP.O, m.. Feb. Ohio river sassed what is known as the danger line lere at noon Thursday, is overrun- ning its natural banks, compelling large numbers of settlers to move. The bot- toms for many miles around here in Kentucky and Missouri are submerged and the railroads are suffering much from softening of beds, washouts and landslides. Tho Cairo levees are several feet above any possible flood and people are flocking from the low lands to take refuge in the city. Revived. LOXDOX, Feb. Abraham Lincoln underwent another surgical op- eration yesterday with tho result that he is greatly relieved of pain and his svmptoms are generally more favorable. The success of the operation has re- vived the hopes of the fa mily that the patient may recover. Mr. Lincoln re- quests public expression of his appreci- ation of the many cablegrams of sym- pathy caused by tbe ex-oneous rumor of the death of bis son. A rrotr.it Ajraltut Robber Feb. tive Anderson, of Kansas, yesterday spoke in favor of his Pacific railroad bill the Pacific Railroads Com- mittee of the House. Tho bill favors putting the road in tho hands of a re- ceiver. Mr. Anderson told the commit- tee the whole West protested apiiast the exorbitant freight rates were, the of a combination oa the part ol the railroad. DBS Morxss, Ia., Feb. Boise was yesterday afternoon inaugu- rated in the hall of the House of Bepre- sentatires as the first Democratic Chief Executive of the State elected in thirty- four years. As became the occasion, the Capitol was gaily decorated with and patriotic emblems. The single rate for round trip tickets from all State potato, granted by the various railroad companies, operated to secure the at- tendance of a vast concourse of Tiaitora. The military parade comprised the Na- tional Guards of Burlington, Sioux City, Ottumwa, Dubuque and Des Moines, and was one of the most imposing pageants ever witnessed in IOWA. In his inaugural address Governor Boise comprehensively reviewed those questions which at present attract the attention of the people of the State. With regard to the railroad situation, the Governor said: "Prior to our pres- ent laws the purchaser of transportation was at the mercy of the railroad com- panies. their power and, to gain great dividends, individual and public rights were alike sacrificed." In speaking of the prohibitory law, the Governor said that from its inception to the present timo it had been despised and ignored in most of the large cities .of the The use of intoxicating beverages bad not diminished, but tho millions of capital invested by citizens in the traffic had been calmly wiped out without a pretense of compensating those who were ruined as a consequence of such action. Enforcement of the law had meant the impoverishment of those interested in the business. DOINGS OF CONGRESS. BTr. Sherman's Anti-Trust Bill Debated In the Democratic tlve Unseated. Feb. bill for the erection and lonotton of a bronze statue of Christopher Columbus at the western en- trance to the Capitol grounds was passed yester- day. Bills on the calendar were taken up and passed making appropriations for public build- Ins as follows: Raanoke, Va., Norfolk, Va., Newport News, Va., Lynchburg, Va.. toO.OOO; Petersburg, Va., The Senate then proceeded to the considera- tion of the bill to declare unlawful trusts and combinations in restraint of trade and produc- tion. Mr. Sherman, -who .reported the bill from the Committee on Finance, said that he had been instructed liy the committee to nwve to strike out the section which fixes penalties for entering into trusts or combinations. Mr. George opposed the bill on the grounds of its inefficiency and unconstitutionality The Sen- ate then went into secret session and a few moments later adjourned. contested election case of Atkrn- son vs. Pendletou was called up inravdiateiv after the readine of tbe journal and the floor was to Mr. Pendleton. He said that although tie k he was addressing a jury which was.preiuvced agamst him, he felt it a duty to apeak in-his ow n behalf. He reviewed the evidence in detail and declared his belief that he had been fairly and honestly elected. Mr. Cooler, of Ohio, closed debate, sup- porting-t'ie'eiaims of the contestant The vote was then taken on the minority resolution (Js- daring Pendleton entitled to the seat. It was 143, nays stnct party vote. The vote was then taken on the majority res- olution. The Democrats refrained from voting in order to have the contestant seated by less than a quorum, so that the .tuestion of right of the Speaker to count a quorum may be taken before the caurti. The vote cays Speaker counting a quorum. The newly elected member (Mr. Atkinson) ap- peared before the bar of the House, and amid applause on the Republican side took the oath of office. The House then in Committee of the Whole proceeded to consider the Urgent Deficiency Mil, but without action on the bill adjourned. A Budget of News From Othor THE LAW-MAKERS. la Both Branches of the Stxty- General Feb. Senate spent of morning to get Mr. Pmtttson two political measures being before the Sen- ate his being needed. The bills re- fcted to Hamilton County and Cincinnati and, after much filibustering on ihe part of the Re- K'lhcang, by a party The first empowered the surveyor of Hamilton Coun- to to appoint his own assistants. second abolishes the Cincinnati of Public Affairs and erects in its stead a Board of Public Improvements. His now a law. Oth.er bills as follows: To authorize the Council of Bew Philadelphia to issue bonds for general taprovements. Bills were introduced as fol- lows: -To permit ex-Union soldiers to organize mutual lite insurance companies under the mate rules govern such associations among inen; to make void any preference f iven S9 n Insolvent debtor to one or more creditors three prior TO the assignment; __. UNDER A LANDSLIDE. ACUy OM KETGSTOX, N- T-, Feb. dis- astrous landslide occurred in the little Tillage of Glasco, on the west bank of the Hudson, five miles from this city, Wednesday afternoon. A large clay bank, which was being out lor brickmaking purposes, caved in and crushed in the residences of John Mc- Carthy and Christopher Tracy. The) houses were completely wrecked. Tra- cy's mother, aged eighty years, was taken from the ruins in an unconscious condition and is fatally injured. Tracy's wife was struck by flying bricks and seriously injured. She also suffered greatly from the nervous shock caused by the disaster, and is in a very critical condition. Lizzie DeGroat. who was visiting tho McCarthy family, was also hurt. The damage to property is about FIRE. Dangerous Work In a Burning Colliery Men Prostrated by Smoke and Gas. Pa.. Feb. The fire in the Cameron coUiery slope is burning j with increased The belief is that the timbers lining the gangway, becoming dry from tbe steam pipes run- ning alongside, were set on fire by a spark from a miner's lamp. The work of fighting the fire is rendered danger- ous by the smolje and gas which fills tho slope. Superintendent Williams and Mine Foreman Brcnnan were removed from the slope in an unconscious condi- tion, having been prostrated by the The two imprisoned men succeeded in effecting their escape Wednesday night through an old chamber. Twenty-three mules were smothr-rcd. Tbe fire is not in the stables, as at first supposed. It is impossible to estimate as yet the amount of damage that will result from the fire. authorizing the making of a bill of exceptions within thirty days after the expiration of the, term Qj court at which the motion for a new trial is decided: making illegal any rate of in' exceeding six per coat, per annum: pro- viding that prisoners in county wits must bo separated practicable; making it manda- tory to charge in au indictment that the ac- cused has been an inmate of the Ohio peniten- tiary when he eotaes within the range of the habitual criminal act: providing for tho ap- pointment of a deputy in Wayne and counties to apprehend criminals under the direc- tion of the society organized in those counties for the arrest and conviction of horse thieies. bill was lose .vad the xias re Additional bills passed as fol- lows: To authorize East Liverpool, Columbianu Couuty, to transfer funiis; to aatl'orue the com- missioners of Crawford County to transfer funds. bill to create ;i State Board ot Elections was introduced to-day It provides for a State bourd to consist of four members, not more than two of shall be from the political party, and to be appointed by the Governor. The members are to receive S10 a for time actually employed in their duties, not eiceepius ilftv days in any one year, and necessary traveling expenses. County boards, also non-partisan and consisting of four mem- tters, are to be appointed by common pleaa Jndres, except in Cuyaboga, Lucas, Hamilton aiff Franklin counties. Where the county boards are selected by the common pleas judges, tbe compensation is filed by tho county com- The State Board has no appointive but can remove for cause. The bill also provides for introducing the Australian ballot system. Bills passed: Authorizing the Coun- cil ol Youngstown to levy a tax not exceeding two-tenths of one mill for the maintenance of a free library; authorizing the Council of Marion to issue HO.OOO bonds for sewer purposes; authorizing East Liverpool to Issue in bonds to provide addi- tional reservoirs for tho waterworks system; authorizing- Covington, Miami County, to issue in bonds to purchase a site and erect a house. authorizirg the township trustees In Trumbull County to take control of abandoned church property and sell thes.ime; Amending Section 964 so as to authorize county infirmary directors to expend annually for ordinary repairs; authorizing Shelby, Richland County, to construct and oporr.tc electric light works; prohibiting local school directors whose term of office expires before the beginning of the school year from employing teachers for the term beginning after the expiration of the di- rectors' term of office, amending Section 6175 so as to compel executors and administrators who fail to settle within eighteen iroat'us to file a statement of the nature and character of in- vestments and Interest; to p-event the gale ot ice taken from ponds of stagnant water, Or water contaminated with vegetable und ani- mal poisons; authonane the council of San- frisky to issue in Londs for hre depart- ment purposes. Bills introduced: Authorizing the trustees of Bloom township, Seneca County, to build a free turnpike, to amend the game law so as to permit the shootim? of wild duck from September 1 to April 1. The Senate joint resolution providing for ad- journment of tbe General Assembly was re- ferred to the Committee on Finance after a dis- cussion in which it vras developed that the Gen- eral Appropriation bill will not be introduced for two weeks._________________ Tough CUIuens Put in JaU. 0., Feb. Winters and Sally Welsh, women con- victed of keeping housco of ill repute, were yesterday sentenced by Judjfe Hance, each to pay fine, the cost of prosecution and undergo imprisonment for thirty days in the county jail. So close all the the cases of this kind, the 'our men, Henneghan, McCrystal, Tlor- ner and Uanlon going to the workhouse and the two women to jail, and the dis- reputable business eudsinSteubenville, all such characters having left the city. A BUKSTED BUBBLE. Officers of a Mutual Association Disappear With AU the of tha Concern, Victims in Lurch. SAX FRANCISCO. Feb. Bank- ers' Mutual Relief Association, one of the many corporation frauds established here recently, has gone to pieces, tho officers disappearing with all the assets of the concern, including even the office furniture. The association was started over a year ago. It advertised to pay from SO to S20 a week sick benefits, to pay S50 burial expenses of members and to insure women's lives. All' this waa to be done for a fee of only a year. A careful estimate showed that with re- ceipts of which the association claimed to have, the first year it in- curred obligations of and with every week of its existence the obliga- tions were increased. Their victims will number fully Two Mlneru Starve to LOWELL, Mass., Feb. 28. Two misers died in this vicinity Wednesday from want of proper attention and the neces- saries of life, Charles H. Grant was found dead in his bouse on his farm new West Andover. He lived alone and, be- sides his farm, is supposed to have had about in cash. He had evidently starved to death, as there were no signs of fuel or food in the house. Charles Roghan, reported to have been worth several thousand dollars, who lived alone in this city, was found in a dying condition. He had probably starved himself. Ho was taken to tho hospital, but lived only a few hours after reach- ing there. _ Schooner Run n Steamer. NEW YOP.K, Feb. The steamer La Champagne, from. Havre, "ran down the schooner Belle Wiggins off Shinnecook Light Wednesday. A small hole was made in the steamer's bows, but the water- tight bulkhead just abaft the bows prevented tho water from getting be- yond the forward compartment- Some of the passengers were awakened by the shock and came on deck, but there was no alarm and most of the passengers did not know of the accident until several hours afterward The schooner was lumber laden and did not sink. Her crew were taken aboard tho and brought here. Pa.. Feb. 25. Bishop J. J. Esher, of Chicago, opened the Eastern Pennsylvania Evar.gflical conference yesterday morning. One hundred and sixty-five ministers were After prayer by the rlicbop. four ferred charges IfLshop of such a nature that the committee consid'-rt-d a trial and fixed Xars-h 13 as trial In- had ja then r' but V- his duty ij'O hiaa to An Indictment. YOUXGSTOW.V, O., Feb. 2S. A special grand jury was called Wednesday and in additional indictment found against W. W. Nivison. the defaulting express agent, charging him with embezzling from the United States Express Company. Indicrmc-nts had previonsly been turned against him forembezzle- tnenu. Nivison. who suicido atColdwatcr. Mich., when arrested, has nearly recovort-d from his wound and will be brought here for trial oa Satar- Carrird FEWI.AT. O.. railroad bridjro across the Giiboa. on tho AnxTir-an Midland railway, was carri'.-d away by U.e flwwl and totally Jl not, likely tho daaa- can under days. of for Jhat road Kirert. Still EVAXSVTI.T.E, Ind.. Feb. The river is still rising tapidly. The farmers who returned to their farms in the bottom lands are again removing their stock to higher ground as rapidly as possible. There is a largo quantity of corn along the river which escaped damage by the recent rise, but will be reached by the present flood. Reports from the Wa- bash. White and Green rivers and their tributaries are that they are out of their banks and still rising rapidly. Stubbed to the Heart. NEW YOHK, Feb. It has tran- spired that Claude CatTenjon, the -Tersey City silk manufacturer whose dead body was found in his bath-room Wednesday, did not die from natural causes as was at first reported. He committed suicide. He had a dagger wouad in his heart and bv his side was found a loaded pistol which he had evidently intended to use in the knife failed him. Business troubles led the snicidc. tm a Snow .K. Col.. Feb. The Al.boy Italian Opora Company's special traia arrivd over ibc Cnion TaczCr Wedacs- dar. Tbe train delared by tbe mow Woc-kadc and boan behind tiae- The of 
                            

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