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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: February 27, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - February 27, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SALEM DAILY NEWS. NO. 49. SALEM. OHIO, FEBRUARY 27. 1890. TWO CENTS. IB. eb. wind portions, accom- swept this Tuesday, doing damage to prop- >ss of at least one borm was severe, as done. B., almost every square was u'n- udences were dis- uns- While the 11 in torrents and a4 to many stocks L synagogue, the Baptist Female house were also damaged. The 100. A tree fell s. James pooper, er and badly in- he new Christian demolished. Les- blown away and (unroofed. About n, a negro school -five children was ition, but no one Batesville, Ark., iw hours, washing ping trains. Three vn near Riverside crushed in the te county, on the summit of n was leveled to Hot Springs and r farmhouses were i feared that sev- je was done to t Little Rock and he latter place a rn down and nine WILL. of Isposeg of One ies in America will of the was filed by Will- i the surrogate's long- the various llowing' To his Qilcon, of Irving, e also bequeaths St Luke s Hos- spolitan Museum fork Cancer Hos- is cousin, James the trustees of to be paid at 9 years from the 0 be invested by Liscretion, the in- 1 used only for the Iso to the trustees ,he sum of fund. All ty, real and per- his son, William EXPIATED. Clark H Play gtat rmrU a Drana at Pa., Feb. 37. CUrk was In the county jail yard Wednesday morning. Clark passed a bad might and the hours tbe execution were spent in spiritual con- versation. At the gallows he said: "I've nothing more to say than that I am innocent and pay the penalty of my innocence. I die with no ill-will to- ward any one in this county or any other county. I hope that God will forgive me." After prayer Clark kissed Rev. Mr. Maxwell, the sheriff, his son, two physicians and the executioner. The black cap was then adjusted, the rope placed about his neck and the drop fell. Seventy-five persons witnessed the exe- cution. There were probably visi- tors in town, but not the slightest indi- cation of disturbance. The remains were taken charge of by Clark's brother and the party passed the exact spot where McCausland was killed. The crime for wbich Clark was hanged was the murder of William McCausland, a drover of Allegheny City, on Septem- ber 10, 1887. MeCausland bad left the steamboat on which he was a -passenger at McCan's ferry, intent upon the pur- chase of cattle in Greene County. About a mile from m er, in a ravine, he was fired on killed. To make sure, the assassin again and also crushed his skull with a stone. The body was robbed of SI Eight persons were indicted for Simplicity in the crime. Six of these vi ere Clarks. Four of the prisoners were convicted. Benjamin Clark confessed, implicating George Clark, James awl George Neff and Zach- ariah Taylor. Neff was granted a new trial and acquitted. Taylor is still in confinement. The evidence upon which conviction was secured was circumstan- tial. _______________ CONGttESSIONAL. Proceedings lu the Senate and House of KepresentatU es. "WASHINGTON, Feb 27 SEf Chand- ler yesterday presented a petition from Union County, Ark., that at the State election there in September, 1838, a systematic reign of terror prevailed, that armed mobs pa raded the'county night and day, terrorizing and shooting .nd whipping colored voters .Hhat schools and churches had been de morali7ed and b Ulot boxes carried off, and ask Ing for the protection guaranteed by the Con- The credentials of Mr "Wilson, of Maryland, for the new Sen.iton.il term were presented and placed on flle Jiusmebs on the calendar was then ta'ieu up twenty bix pension and private bills were passed, also the following public bills Appropn.itmg J100 000 for enlarge- ment of the public building at Topeka Kan building at WORLD'S FAIR BILL It to Up Any Changes by Conrreea In tte BUI Will be Accepted by An Wllllac AbMa by Amj for he Flood. 27 Big Mi- highest point yes- eat damage was Jong its course it Seren Mile, a f here, one life is lost in the flood, it a whole family ying to cross Four just north of the has turned much s ceased, and the hat the flood will f Pell's bonds- ie. called Wednes- District Attorney's be desired to be re- Pell was not witb t Attorney started him. Van Tine aount of ott tinst PelL growing the Lenox Hill, h National banks. "dandisheldpcad- a new bondsman. by iwo froa ibis Cnal- appropriating tT5 000 for a public St. Albatis, Vt The Senate took up the Educational blU and Mr. Reagan spoke Mr Reagan's argument was directed chiefly against the constitutional ity of the me-iscie Mi. WJson uf IMarjiand, also argued against the constitutionality of the bllL Mr Butler offered a resolution (wh'chwas agreed to) authonzmg the select commux.ee us the five civilized tribes of Indians to investigate the status of the negotiation between the United States Government and the Cherokees In rela- tion to the Cherokee outlet, with er to send lor persons and pipers. After a brief tecret ses- sion tbe Senate adjourned after the reading of the journal the contested election case of Atkinson rs Pendleton, from the First district of West Virginia, was called up. Mr Rowell and Mr Lacey, of Iowa, championed Atkinson s case, and Messrs. O'Ferrall and Wilson advocated Pendleton's claims The speeches were con- nued to a close analysis of the ev Idence W'.ta- oJt taking action and pending further debate on the case the House adjourned. A. Desperate Break for Liberty. NEW YORK, Feb Wednes- day morning a desperate attempt was made bv six prisoners to escape from Randall's Island. The leaders of the mutineers were Frank McClelland and James Riley. They knocked down the night guard. Jonah Ketch am, and bound, gagged and robbed him. An alarm was given and a thorough search made in the fog and darkness for the men. After an hour's search McClelland and Riley were found on the water front and shortlv afterwards the other four men were "discovered. They were held in for trial.____________ Two of an Explosion. CmrrEWA FALLS, Wis. Feb. Tuesday night, when Mrs. J. S. Doss built a fire in her kitchen stove, a ter- rific explosion occurred and tbe stove was blown through the ceiling. Mrs. Doss was badly but not fatally burned. The explosion broke the drum of her little girl's ear. Mrs- Doss is separated from her Husband, who is suspected of placing the explosive in the wood. It is charged that he attempted the same thing twice before._________ Tire In Stinf ruder Orottnd SIIAMOKIX. Pa.. Feb. 27. started last evening in the stables in the Cam- eron colliery slope. 500 yards below tte surface. TWO miners working in ft deeper portion of the slopr art- shut in. Headline parties hare them with fair prosjwis of throuch an Tbonr arc aboot fifty in thr and St is feared tbi-r bare all WA8HIX6TOH, Feb. The Fair Committee of the Honae yesterday Chicago as a site for the fair. The general bill waa taken np by the committee and amended by inserting the name Chicago and then referred to a sub-committee consisting of Messrs. Candler, Hitt and Springer for perfec- tion. The sub-committee was directed to report a bill that will cover the wishes of the Chicago people. Mr. Hitt ex- plained to the committee what the Chi- cago people desired. He stated that Chicago and the State of Illinois were willing to conform to any changes that might be'Tnade in the bill in the House. Concerning the Government appropri- ation of provided for in the bill, Mr. Hitt said that the representa- tives of Chicago had not asked for this, and they were willing abide by any reduction in the amount that might be dQ. There seemed to be a disposition on the part of the opponents of Chicatfo as a site for the fair and of the oppo- nents to the holding of the Exposition, to cut out this appropriation. The Chi- cago people would be perfectly willing to agree to this if it were accomplished. The fact that the money pledged to Chi- cago had been secured under a corpora- tion chartered by the State of Illinois, should, said Mr. Hitt, be recognized. The fair itself the representatives of Chicago preferred to hold under a na- tional charter. Concerning the commis- sion of 100, Mr. Hitt said that they pre- ferred that half of its members should be nominated by the Governor of Ilir- nois and half by the mayor of Chicago. They also preferred that the two com- missioners from each State should be of the two political parties Mr. Springer spoke briefly on the Gov ernment appropriation. Before taking any action on this matter, he thought it would be well to ascertain just how much money was needed and then make ;he appropriation conform to that. He offered a resolution requesting the Sec- retary of the Treasury to furnish the committee an estimate of the cost of the buildings necessary for the Government ixhibits, thecostof placingthe exhibits in the buildings, and the -cost- of their are and safe return to the places where they belong-. This resolution was passed and the committee adjourned. AH EXTENSIVE STEAL. Winn Minn., nty United States Marshal Cnwphell, who want from Bed Witt a posse of Indian polios to investi- gate the reported timber steal in the Ticfmtty of Rainy Lake, with instruc- to arrest any persons found tree- on Indian or Government land, has bare, they say timber has been carried on tor many years antil now tbe banks of streams pcylng into Rainy Lake have been of all marketable pine and hardwood timbat. Meat of these lumber- men are Canadians, who in and cat timber on rican soil under tbe pretext that they have a right to do so because their wives are Indian women belonging to the Bed Lake reservation- It was also ascertained that the whisky traflc Is carried on Indiscriminately by the Canadians. Furs are bought irom the Indians in exchange lor whisky, and.many young girls, mere children, ars bartered away for a few pints of the vilest of intoxicants. Rat Portage, on the Canadian side, forms the headquar- ters for the supply of the traffic. AN ILLEGAL. SESSION. Claimed That Every Act Passed by the Legislature of North la Kail and Told. BISMARCK, N. D., Feb. best parliamentarian in the Legislature says every measure pa ssed by that body is il- legal. The ground for this startling proposition is in the organization of the legislative assembly. The Governor convened the Legislature November 19, as provided in section 17 of the schedule of the State constitution, which said that the Legislature should convene for the purpose of electing two United States Senators. The said section says nothing about any other business than the election of Senators. The Legisla- ture, however, after electing Senators took up its regular work and proceeded as in regular session. A further mistake was made when the Legislature met in January that it did not reorganize and enter upon a regular session. Now it is neither special nor regular. Credit or or Debtor Not to Hun Now. NEW YOBK, Feb. S. Warner, who was interested in the operations of Grant Ward and claimed to be a creditor of the firm to the ex- tent of and who was accused oi wrongfully receiving the firm's funds, died Tuesday in England, where he had living for some lime. He had successfully defended various suits brought against him by the assignee of There, rumors at the time of the failure that he had made several million dol lars by his connection with the firm. DANGERS OF THE SEA. Attempt to Reacne People on a Dismasted Ship Meets With Disaster and the Kffort Is Abandoned. NEW YORK, Feb. steamer Ems, which arrived yesterday from Bre- men, experienced very severe weather during the entire passage. On Febru- ary 22 she sighted the dismasted British ship Hebe, which was drifting at the mercy of the waves. A boat manned by a volunteer crew put off from the Ems to rescue the six men who could be seen on the Hebe's decks. A' heavy wave swamped the boat and one seaman was drowned The others managed to cling to the upturned boat until rescued by the Ems. The attempt to take the men off the Hebe was then abandoned The Hebe showed no sijrts of distress and was riding the waves well. The men were moving about freely as if free from fear of disaster. The captain of the Ems thinks the Hebe will keep afloat until some vessel comes along in better weather and is able to assist her. Displayed the Right Spirit. NEW TOKK, Feb. Stein- way has written a letter to Mr. Otto Young, of Chicago, charirman of tbe sub-finance committee of the World's Fair, in which he says: "Should the bill just passed in the House of Representa- tives locating the fair of 1890 at Chicago, also pass the Senate and be approved by the President. I hereby authorize you to subscribe for me. as a citizen of New York, to the capital stock of said fair, the snm of 520.000. this subscription be- ing made upon roar assurance that there is no further liability." KaMprr Trwt to YOUK. Feb. of all the manufacturers of rubber goods in tbe United Stales met at tbo The formation of t discussed, and it is oae of will It in Para, and that r-jbber sssrt Roeont Brents of Note in Xeigfc- borinf Towns. LEGISLATIVE IS IT A CONSPIRACY? VB vt aa oa March 31 by Daring Robbery. GAINESVILLE, Tex., Feb. night two men entered C. W. Hender son's store at Daugherty, I. T., and covering two clerks with revolvers, com pelled them to open the safe. The rob hers took all the money in the safe about and then robbed the clerks of their watches and money. The clerks were marched into the woods for a mile and tied up. The robbers then mountec eir horses and escaped. The clerks burst their bonds in half an hour, but no trace of the robbers could be found. A Menace to the Peace of Europe. ST. PETERSBURG, Feb. No- vosti has caused a sensation by the pub- an editorial commenting upon the augmentation by Austria of her army, and of her action in assisting Bul- garia to meet the indemnity due by that country to Russia. The Novosti says that the policy of A ustria constitutes a menace to the peace of Europe, and is of a character to provoke counter ments on the part of the powers in- terested in the eastern q uestion. Oat the lo.nlt. NEW YOKK, Feb. 27 dispatch from West Point says cadets Cassctt and Law- ton, members of the fourth class at the Military Academy, fought Monday night for six rounds, regular prize ring rules. In the last round Cassett was knocked out and has since been laid up in tbe hospital. His injuries arc not serious, .however. Lawton's face is badly bruisM. Tbe fight frew out of an insulting remark made by Cassctt two months Jail tUnn-4. Wash.. Feb. 27. Tbf county cotrrt bouse, which was also used as a jaiL was cuwptetelT destroyed Iry bad _ CMMC IMMI A this moraine, and todlt a recess until three accepted an invitation trout tike teealty of the State university to visit the eol- tsga. The Republicans raised a question, on the of the journal, ojrtala potass of orter Usale yesterday afternoon having been aect- oorftwd from the record. The eorrwe- ttosn were and after uaattog a bill au- SorUlng New Philadelphia lo issue MO.OOO In for tbe general Improvement of the town the reoesa was taken, when the House recon- vened the following bflla were introduced: To prohibit the evading of the payment of railroad ear fares by the ejection of passengers at potato other than those with suitable accommo- to prevent suffering and exposure, and also prohibiting the obstructing of passenger ears, engines, etc.; to prohibit corporations from requiring women and children to ride la amending Section of the trosat officer act by permitting township clerks to set as such officers; amending Section 545 so provide that probate judges ma; file Itemized cost bills with papers in each case, instead of recording them; to regulate the drawing of grand and petit jurors by providing that all the names shall be drawn from the box before the box is again filled; to authorize the Governor to appoint three State examiners of building as- sociations, amending Section 4013 so as to au- thorize township boards of education to admit persons over twenty one to attend school upon such terms and the payment of sucn tuition as the board may prescribe, allowing a majority of the voters of a village the privilege of attach Ing the villrge to an adjoining city, to pay mem bers of the Legislature tlO a dav for each day's actual work; twelve cents a mile each way, and pro Tide that they shall not be m session more than siity Cays; to provide for the appointment by the ernor of a commissioner to adjust Claims of occupants and owners of lands around the Mercer County reservoir to authorize the council of C.yde. Sandusky County, to transfer from v arious funds to the sinking passed; to repeal the law under which the in vestigating committee of the delinquent taxes appointed by each county auditor acts; to allow clerks of common pleas courts twenty five cents for affidavits in pension c'.a'ms; to provide that where a dog running at large is wounded, the person who (nils to kill it shall not. be prose- cuted under Section WO I: to amend the Dow law BO that the fefs of audi'ors and treasurers for collection shall be paid out of the liquor tax. At four o'clock a call of the House was de- manded by Mr. Price, author of the relistrict- Ing bill, and 107 members answered their names. He then reported hack his bill, and it was or- dered to a vote Mr Hodge If the gentle- man bad any objections to submitting the prop- osition to a vote of the people before passing the bill Thu previous question was ordered, but before It was sustatneJ Mr Williams, of Preble, secured the floor to explain his vote, and made a humorous speech. The bill was then passed by a strict party vote. Senate bill authorizing Sidney, Shelby County, to issue bonds to the amount of for gen- eral improvements, was pissed Senate amend- ments to the Oleomargarine bill were concurred in. The bill is now a law. first business transacted was the offering by Senator Qaumer and the unanimous adoption of the following joint resolution: "Be it resolved, by the General Assembly of the State of Ohio, That tae present session of the Sixtj-ninth. General Assembly adjourn on Mon- day, March at three o'clock p. m., meet again Monday, December 1, 1890. The res- oJtttiow must be Adopted by the House before going into effect. Tne chairman of the House Finance Committee is of the opinion that the business before the General Assembly not be disposed of m time to adjourn March 31 The Senate passed bills as follows. To provide for the election of an additional common Pleas judge in the second sub-division of the Tenth judicial district, comooaed of Wyandot, Marion and Crawford counties; to limit the public ex- penditures over receipts in municipalities by making It unlawful to make contracts to pay any money not already in the pnbllc treasury to the credit of the department from which the expenditure is to be made The Senate con- firmed the nomination of Rev. Dr. D. H. Moore, ot Cincinnati, as a trustee of the Ohio Univers- ity at Athens. The Senate at noon recessed to four p. m. and went in a body to the Ohio State University to inspect the institution and take part in a dinner given by the faculty and officers When the Senate came together again Mr. Ben- House bill relating to the manufacture and tale of oleomargarine was taken up and passed. Mr. Van Cleat's bill to reorganize the Ohio pen- itentiary by authorlyin? the Governor to ap- point a new board of managers, was also paased. FLOOD The.Scloto River the Low lands Around the Capital City. COT.TJMBFS, 0., Feb. high water in the Scioto river did not reach the point of damage till two o'clock yes- terday morning, when the river broke through into the canal below the city and the water covered a vast expanse of low lands. The principal damage will be to the banks of the Columbus feeder of tbe Ohio canal. Some of the manu- factories along the river were temporari- ly disabled by water pouring in upon the machinery, but no extensive damage is reported. Considerable embarrass- ment was caused at an early hour by the breaking of tbe natural gas main where it crosses Biy Walnut creek. The sup- ply had to be shut off until repairs were made. Water interfered with the ma- chinery of the Columbus electric light plant and tbe lamps were turned off at a late hour Tuesday night. Hick Water Jftixllar. O.. Feb. Blancbard river, which runs through tbe center of Fiadlav. is higher than it has been for and is doift? a jrreat deal of damage in tbe of tbe city. Tbe water ban cellars of a and al! tb" have abaft- of Toledo. Coluinlrta Jk. Cincinnati railmai nitbia limits. ia a Tiivfc .wr si at a t track Tr-iltar PTTTSBCKOH, Feb. Monday William Minnick, a well-known resi- dent of Braddock. Pa., was eownittedL to tbe Dixmont asylum for the under circumstances very peculiar. Mr. Minnick has charged Rev. J. R. a Methodist minister of Monongnhelsv with paying-improper attentions to MHL Minnick dnrinjr a period of six yearnv Minnick also neensed his wife with oeiYing improver attentions from sev- eral other men and had addressed let- ters to certain individuals threatening to shoot them if their attentions to wife did not cease at once. of Braddock, and Dr. Craddock, of South: Pittsburgh, signed the commitment of Minnick, stating that Minnick was in- sane from unwarranted jealousy. While on the train en route to Dix- mont, Minnick vigorously resisted the> officers in charge, protesting that he was. not crazy, but was the victim of a con- spiracy to get him out of the way. Sev- eral prominent citizens of Braddock- were interviewed yesterday and that Minnick is not insane. Some of them openly chargr. Rev Riley and oth- ers with indiscreet actions with Mrs. Minnick. Rev. Riley says that he not bEen guilty of any indiscretion CONTINENTAL, KAIL ROAD. Fan-American. Cona tract Ion of a I tall way to Connect. All Represented In the Confer- ence. WASHTSGTOX. Feb. report of the committee on railroads favoring construction of a continental railroad, was adopted by the Pan-American Con- gress yesterday. The recom- mends: x That a railroad connecting all or major ity of the nations represented in. this conference will contribute to the development of the moral rela- tions and material interests of said na- tions. That the means best adapted to be- gin and carry out its execution is the appointment of an international com- mission of engineers to study the possi- ble routes, determine their true estimate their cost and compare the re- ciprocal advantages. That the commission should be com- posed of three engineers appointed by each nation, with tbe privilege of divid- ing into sub commissions and appoint as many other engineers and employes might be considered necessary for more rapid execution of the work. That the railroad, in so far as the> common interests will permit, should unite tbe principal cities lying in vicinity of its route. Crooked County Official Gives Himself Up, LEBANON, 0., Feb. sensation, was caused last August by the flight of O. H. Graham, auditor of Warren Coun- ty. An examination of his affairs showed, ho -was short and that the coun- ty treasurer, Coleman, was also impli- cated. Coleman was arrested and is now on trial, but Graham could not be found and no trace was had of him until Tues- day wben it was announced that he had. voluntarily surrendered. Favored the Per Diem Pension BUI. SYRACUSE, N. Y., Feb. New 'York Department of the G. A. R yester- day after electing officers adopted, reso- lutions favoring the Per Diem Pension bill and declaring that the Dependent Pension bill would not satisfy the vet- erans of this State. Corporal Tanner made a speech declaring his conversion, to this The encampment has been. a very successful one Jumped the Track. ROANOKE, Va., Feb. coach of the eastbound passenger train was- wrecked here last night by a truck, jumping the track. The train run slow- ly through the city, thus preventing a more serious disaster. 3To one was killed, ten persons were more or less cut and bruised. All were from Southern, points. _______________ War oik the Lottery. TOP.OSTO, Ont. Fob. 37. Frank- Adams, formerly railroad ticket agent here, was arrested yesterday on a charge of selling Louisiana lottery tickets. It is tbe intention of the city authorities to prosecute the and Mail for printing advertisements of the. Louisiana Lottery Company. In the Caxc. FAtus N. Feb. Tcrdict of coroner's jury in the Saw- telle case in substance is that Hiraaa to his death by reseon ot ballet woands inflicted by Isaac Saw- tellc. There has no evidence bo- JCTC the jury show the parlicirutiua of an accomplice in the crime. 4 acyr-ra X. J-. trahn- 
                            

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