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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: February 25, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - February 25, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SALEM DAILY NEWS. NO. 47. SALEM. OHIO, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25. 1890. TWO CENTS. World's Fair 2. SENATORS VS. SCRIBES. Who GtTe Away Sctaloui to be ry to Determine ie House of lives. uitect Ftaally of the Wectera Excepting ft in administering n E. Reyburn, of member who suc- lelley, the House Lon yesterday in >f the proposed r. Eight 0 eighth and last 157 votes and the Reed rapped for re about 300 Rep- r. The galleries waiting to etween the ad- ities. Chauncey iry Whitney and rk City; Mayor overnor Francis, of representative ind many Wash- 1 of the original ere in tho gal- crested and ans> tfr. Reyburn had taken his seat, read the special icthod of voting id requiring some majority of the irgia, wanted to i an opportunity e question as to be a fair before ker Reed replied order there could e clerk to call the which resulted: 73, St. Louis 61, e vobe for Cum- Mr. Skinner, of rst vote was very inds of Chicago. nt by the Speaker neither city had f the votes cast, rdered, which re- Sew York 83, St. 47. Cumberland s a contestant. suit had been an- ity had received a jcs cast, the third The official an- ,al vote, 306; nec- Chicago 127, New Washington 34. )11 was called and ilted: Total vote York 95, St. Louis The Chicago men esult for they had against a gain of >rk. St. Louis lost gton five. wed a total of 313, >tes, while Chicago icr column. St. off ten votes and 1 was excitement xth again began. he Southern mem- stly supported St. were beginning ere going over to pectations of tho tho highest point, polled their full ily SIT votes. while ind St. Lon is and  l c f el t reading of the caia risie for con- is roll )f West Virginia, WASHIXGTOX, Feb. The Senate has about deter mined -to investigate wicked newspaper men who insist upon publishing to the world the of the executive session. The matter was under discussion for some time Mon- day and the old question of the ad- Tisability of opening the doors during the discussion of nominations was de- bated at length. During the discussion. Mr. Teller urged upon the Senate the advisability of adopting his proposition to open the doors, submitted during thft special session last April. II the Senate entrusts the investiga- tion of the betrayal of secret session news to a special committee it will get yery little satisfaction. This thing has been done before and the Senate had the melancholy pleasure of imprisoning two newspaper correspondents in a Senate committei room for contempt, and of re- leasing them finally without learning the source of their information. WORK OF THE FLAMES. BiulneM at Elmira, Jf. T., Softer Heavy Loss bj Fire. ELMIBA, X. Y., Feb. Fire was discovered Monday morning in Stuart Beach's furnishing store, 309 East Water street. The flames quickly spread through the building, a four- story structure, and to the adjoining house. Stock valued at 815, 000 belong- ing to Stuart Beach was destroyed; insurance, Household goods be- longing to Thomas Hotchkiss viuch were stored on the third story were also destroyed. The loss to Mr. Hotchkiss is on which there is no insur- ance. Harris Son's, dry goods, lose heavily on stock. They are insured for Young Co., hardware No. 307, estimate damage to goods at Loss on building THE ARIZONA DISASTER. Reported That Two Hundred Fer- Were Drowned by the Bursting of the Dam on River. PHOENTS, Ariz., Feb. A courier has just arrived from the lower dam on the Hassayarnpa river and reports that another tremendous mountain of water came down the Eassayampa about two o'clock Saturday morning, and that 134 men were lost at the lower dam, whero they were at work. They were all whites except three Chinese lie re- ports the town of Wickenberg as beiny all right. The loss of life in the valley between Wickenbeig- and tho dam may not be known for some days, but will be thirty or forty The courier states that the upper dam had undoubtedly and carried tho two dams below down with it. Against tbe Civil Service Com- mlMton. Altered that the ConuniMioMn Guilty of Somber of Utefml Acts Wfclch are FftTorltiMB. wttk Departmental OflMaU W la of the "JBectt ELECTRIC DANGERS. Tell Abo.t the ratal  een made in violation of tho "merit and favorites have secured places with little reference to thjjir qualifications; that relatives of offioirs of the commission have been attached ;o the commission, gaining a knowledge of the secrets of the commision, hand- ling the records of the privilege denied Senators and Repre- compensation .tji'i. in direct violation of the law. Dr. Nagle, of the Bureau of Vital Sta- .tiaticft, also produced a list of the deaths from electric shocks reported to the health board. Witness was questioned by Mr. Gibbons, who appeared for cer- tain members of the Board of Electrical Control, ,and whom the committee gave the privilege of asking a few questions as a witness, hut refusing him the privi- lege as counsel. He testified at consid- erable length with regard to high and low tension currents. A high tension current would kill a man, he said, much more quickly than a low tension, but the latter might cause more torture and cause death just as surely. He thought it more painful to be burned by a low tension than killed immediately by a high tension. Low tension currents in his opinion were just as dangerous to property as high ones. He referred to a recentcase where some property was destroyed by fire caused by a low tension current, to sub- stantiate his statement. Improper con- struction and improper insulation were the causes.______________ CHANDL.ER AND CAIX that therao- dc- in time. ibo yeas maA There The American Association Arranges Its Dttes for the Cowing Season. PHILADELPHIA, Eeb. nle committee of the American Associa- tion met here Monday and arranged a schedule which will be submitted to tha Association at their meeting at Syra- cuse, March 10. Until then it will not be made public. The season will open April 17, and close October 12. The eastern and western clubs will first play a series in their territories, and then the western clubs will come east. Each club will make three trips around the circuit.______________ Will Decide the Rebate Question. NEW YORK. Feb. Appraisers Cooper, of this city: A. B. Stearns, of Boston; F. B. Home, of Chicago: Daniel C. Clerk, of Philadelphia, and Thad S. Shanetts. of Baltimore, organized yes- terday under an order from the United States Treasurer and to-day they will begin piiblic sessions to ascertain if tbo four or five million dollars shall bo re- turned which has been levied as duties since on hat materials and manu- factures of silk, adverse to the recenl decision in Robertson vs. Edelhoff, oi thc> United States Supreme Court. Convention of PiTTsnuiMJii. Feb. first Slav- ish convention ever held in the United State? is in session 5ft Hall. Allegheny City. The object of ;h" con- vention is to forsi a national orpvniza tion for tbc pnrpose of looking after th interests of H'insrarians in all parts o the wan try and establish a system bj which people can bo cmV-d ar.d their rights protected. Dele- jfaVes are Tcrwat from a of th largr cities. York it tlwilr r in KMHUM. S Boiler Explosion Kills Three Men. MOBILE, Ala., Feb. The tug boat Flora blew up yesterday about twenty- five miles above this place in White- house bend. The vessel had stopped for repairs and the captain was on the bank putting on a hawser when the boiler exploded. The boat was blown into splinters and sank at once. Engi- neer Grimely and his son were killed; also the colored cook. Pilot Thomas Powell was badly cut about the head. The Captain, Charles Hall, was struck by flying fragments of the boat and slightly injured. Low water in the boiler is supposed to have been the cause. _ Two Brothers Drowned. i Scro N. Y., Feb. The bodies of John and Thomas Kelly, brothers, aged respectively twenty-two and twenty-cipht years, were found Monday morning oftjthe steamboat deck at this place. There were no marks or; either body to indicate foul play. The two brothers went to Now York on Sat- urday and it is supposed they returned on a late train and walked off tho dock accidentally. Agnlnftt Botxlle AUIerman K. Y-. Feb. 25. At the opening of the terra of the Supreme Court in this city yeslcrdav. .Tsdge Par- ker a motion U> dismiss the case against ex-Aldorman Cleary. of New York, indicted for bribery. Two letters were read from District Attorney Fel- of New York, saying he deemed it unwLv to continue tho case, on account of the difficulty in tho way of producing Have a Tilt In the United States The Educational Bill Again Up Serenely. WASHINGTON, Feb. the Sen- ate yesterday Senator Chandler introduced a resolution to censu-e Senator Call for inserting in the Record as part of his remarks on the Florida assassination last week, tha charge that Mr- Chandler, because of his speeches In in making j Senate, was responsible for the political murders in Florida. Mr. Chandler made a hit ter speech against Mr Call, to which tue Flor- ida Senator responded. Mr. Teller expressed the opinion that there should be no tampering with the Record except to correct grammatical mistakes. Nothing of a denunciatory character ought to be added to the report. Mr. Hoar spoke of the neces- sity that the Record should bs one of pho. toffraphic correctness, as therein lay the whole safety of every Senator s reputation for his ac- tion in the Senate. Mr. Vest ridiculed the idea of the photo- graphic correctness of the Record and alluded to the fact that, a few years ago the same speech published as having been made by two dif- ferent Representatives and had been prepared by neither. Flnilly, on of Mr Harris the reso- lution went over. A communication from the Attorney General with the report of Marsha] Mlzell about the assassmat'oa of Deputy Mar- shal Saunders w as presented and ref-rred and the Educat onal bill came up as unfinished bus- iness and Mr. Faulkner addresser! the Senate In to it. Mr. Sherman offered a resolu'ton which was agreed to calling on the Secretary of War for a report ot the court martial on the trial of private Wild, and then Senate after a short secret session adjourned. DENOUNCED AS LIES. Doings in Ohio Cities and Towns. MURDEROUS ASSAULT. O.. Feb. Charles Shon- derkcr and wife, hearing- a barplar in room early Monday up and stmck a Hjpbt. followed bsrflar and hiffl the wii'-n of General Jubal Early Recent Re Concerning the Louisiana Lottery Company. RICHMOND, Va., Feb. the reported efforts of the Louisiana Lottery Company to obtain a new char- ter in Dakota, General Jubal A. Early a joint commissioner of the drawings o that institution with General Beaure gard, makes a public statement in whicl he says the Louisiana Lottery Company had nothing to do with the proposition reported to have been made in the Nortl Dakota Lesislature, nor had the ccn; pany any connection with the proposi tion. General Early also denounces as un- founded the statement that the com- pany proposes ft> procure a renevral of its charter by bribing the Legislature of Louisiana. The constitution of the State, the General says, prohibits the charter of any lottery after the expira- tion of that of the present company. The statement that the lottery company con- tributed to the Republican campaign fund during the last Presidential can- paign is also denied by the General. Threatened With Lynching. Ind.. Feb. Wnmp brutally assaulted Mrs. George Weaver near Wheatland. Saturday, and made his escape. The marshal and a posse started in pursuit and oa Sunday cap- tured a man who garo the nam'i of George Hoover, and wbo says his home is in Cincinnati. Ttc denied being the pjilty man. bm tho husbanl of his vic- tim identified him. When it Vjcaaie kaowa that tbc fellow bad been caa- lurwl bijf crowd catbered the jail xad threats of lyachiajr freely THE LEGISLATURE. Day Introdaced IB the Houte. i, Feb. Senate met at four p. m. Wilt were read the .-ecood time and re- and the Senate adjourned. the conclusion of the reading of tfca jopraal. Mr. Griffin oh ected to the record, It   4be .Speaker. Mr. Brtmn did object, this time, iae ruling of 4he that a Senate hill which was on the witortar regularly had been read and referred, while the journal did not show this 'transaction. The Speaker or- dered the correction made and there was net further objection from the Republican M to the approval ot the Journal, which fa led to make reference to the tilt over the motion to postpone indefinitely the Pr'ce redlstncting bill. OB motion of Mr. Griffin the rules were suspended and Senate bill authorizing Sylvania, County, to transfer from the gen- eral fund to tiie ligbt, school, street and bridge funds, wcs pas-ed. Mr. Gritnn introduced a bill to amend the general law ?o that no penalty attach to shooting ducks and other frame in season on lands other than mineral, timber and agric ultiiral, and on waters which are not surrounded by such The swainp and other it asve lands of the State are rapidly being taken up by wealthy sporting clubs and Mr. (Jrlffln thinks tbat unless a halt is called there will be no place on land or water left where a poor man can hunt without layinghimself liable topun.shment.'S a trespasser Another bill Introduced by Mr. Griffin provides that the pun. 1st meet for shooting otters, must rats and other fur-bearing animals shall not ihold seaw the shores of Lnke Erie. Another bill Intro- duced by Mr. Griffin provides for an advisory board for each county jh.ldren s home, consist- ing of three women, who shall vsit and Inspect the children's home every ninety days and cen- ter with the trustees and make recommenda- tions as to changes and improvements in the management. Bills Introduced: To provide far the leabe or sale of the canal; to authorize the commissioners of Lorain Coun- ty to refund monejs collected on forfeited rec- ognizances where parties have been pjssed; to compel stewards, superintendents and managers of penal and benevolent Institu- tions to purchase native live-stock for food con- sumption; to reorganize the Labor Commis- sioner's office by changing its name to the Com- missioner of Labor Statistics' Department; to amend the indigent soldiers' relief act so M to allow female nurses who during the war to receive benefit from tho funds; declaring al roads in use enty-one years public highways A BURSTING SEWER the Union Depot at Immense Amount of Damage Done. COLUMBUS, O., Feb. disaster bordering in severity on the one of some years ago, when the roof was blown from the Union Depot, occurred Monday morning, in the passenger station and grounds, as the result of the heavy rainstorm. The depot sewer burst, the east yards were badly damaged and the tracks in tho depot flooded with water, making a scene of desolation and doing an amount of damage whioh will re-, quire much labor and time to repair. On several occasions there has been great damage from the high water, and it has even flooded the depot to some ex- tent, but only for a short time and not compare with the damage done yes- terday. ______________ Shooting Affray. PDTOLAT, O., Feb. Trone, a builder, is in iail charged with shooting with intent to kill a glass worker by the name of Braunman, who now lies at his boarding house on tho East Side with a bullet in his abdomen and will likely die within the next twenty-four hours. The whole affair is shrouded in mys- tery, as neither the wounded man, hia friends or the prisoner will make any disclosures regarding the cause of the shooting, which occurred Saturday night. ______________ Crank Jailed for Axsanlt. AKROS. O., Feb. Single- tary, Tallmadge's wild west crank, has ixsen arrested for assault and battery and jailed here. He went to the home of his wife and mother-in-law, and in tho midst of an argument with the former, started for the room in which his shotgun is kept. His wife's cries brought in the neighbors. Singletary grappled with one of them, but was overpowered and tied with a rope. Allecrri I'leiMl Xot Guilty. O.. Feb. 25. De- fere, the clairvoyant who has been in jail for a month under indictment for jottjplicity in the forjrery of nofcjs to tbc amount of ?30.noo on Richard Brown, af Youngstown. O.. was arraigned yes- terday and pleaded not ruilty. Joseph Lamb. bT alleged en- tered a similar plea. A motion to quash the indictment was filed. tllMh fcy W DATTOS. O.. Feb. washed ost the natsral :nain tbat wan laid thronea cretk lo all tike West Side. force of op m of likfj a jrcTner sa- til the shot off tb" All tb'1 citr AttMl by Three Acton and Badly Cp. CHICAGO, Feb. B. risen, manager of the Paymaster pany, now playing at the 'Standard Theater, was murderously Sunday afternoon in front of the thea- ter, just after the matinee. His were three Brinker, gave Ms name to the police as Coulterj P. Cook and another, who escaped. Mr. Harrison, hia wife and Detn. leading lady of the company, emerged from the theater they were net by Brinker and his friends, who Made suiting remarks. Harrison haated ladies into a carriage and as he turned struck in the neck by Cook. Brinker then drew a knife and slashed Harrison in the left breast, cutting through his clothing and penetrating the flesh. The actors then rushed at Harrison, and although he fought pluckily he wonld have fared badly had not two police officers interfered and arrested Brinker and Cook. Harrison is badly cut about the hands and arms. The quarrel leading up to the assault began in Detroit ten days ago. BANK WRECKER'S TRIAL. More Testimony in the Case of Ex-Presi- dent Claanen, of the Sixth National Bank of New Yoik. NEW YORK, Feb. examina- tion of Peter J..CUasen on the charge of wrecking the Sixth National Bank was resumed Monday before United States Commissioner Shields. Isaac P, the first witness, identified a check for drawn by his firm on January 22 in favor of George H. PelL, The firm received in return twq checks from Pell, one' for and the other for James A. mons and B. K. Watson signed theM checks, which were drawn upon Equitable and Lenox Hill banks. Pell had brought to witness' firm in securities which he said the president of an uptown bank desired hypothecate. As Pell refused to the bank witness refused to take tha securities. The names of Phillip Lu Meyer and Wilhaiu L. Kilduff called as witnesses. They were not present and the examination was journed until Friday. Shot Hi Wife and Suicided. CAEBOlf. Wyo., Feb. Mor- rison, aged fifty years, and whose has not lived with him for some time, on Sunday went to the house of Mrs. Hunter, where Mrs. Morrison was making her home. On entering tha house Morrison rushed to his wife'9 room, carrying a revolver in one hand and a dirk knife in tho other. He placed the revolver to Mrs. head and fixed, inflicting a wound from which it is thought she can not recover. Morri- son then went to an adjoining room where he cut his own throat and died in a few minutes. The Negro Outclassed the Frofewor. SPOKANE FALLS, Wash., Feb. Jerry Flowers, a negro, knocked oat Prof. William Kendall, on Sunday. Kend all was overmatched, his opponent weighi ng 220 pounds. The fight lasted one and a half minutes and the negro was nev er hit. With his first blow he knocked Kendall against the wall, and the second stroke sent the latter'a head crashing against a post. Kendall then fell to the floor, and when he strug- gled to his fret Flowers smashed him the face, knocking him down and out. teft Fortune to Que., Feb. 25 Cbanto- loup. the brass founder, who died last week, left his entire fortune to his em> except a few thousand dollars which wore bequeathed to charities. The estate is valued at 5--.00.000. Each of the 500 workmen receives ?400 and the balance is left to three foremen, who are to carry on the business with it. M. Chantcioup was a Frenchman and had to flee frotn Parts during the riota I there. lie settled in Canada and built np a large business.________ An Awfal Tragedy. ST. AU-.AN-. Que.. Feb. quarrel Sunday. Rudolph Diibois raar- dered bis wife- mother-in-law and hia two children- quarrefcd with his mother-in-law early in day. then went drank quart of whisky and then returned to the boune- Tbe quarrel was then with terrible results stated. The jnuraera committed with an axe. to the but is brine pur- tiy a large will y Martin- j A. l-urd'tm. vf Aai-r ;i> ajUii'd Aanie Tar'xc an aaaed 5a f-ae iiaj a Mo-i. Jtr tbafc ti frwn. i __ rS1 -_. P li nflrCHVtftcm-   

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