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Salem Daily News: Monday, February 24, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - February 24, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SALEM DAILY NEWS. SALEM. OHIO, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24. 1890. TWO CENTS. of a Dam In Vator Liberated Lafce, Bear- a Waves. t the was Kespon- b. The fine iuilt across tee he Walnut Grove y two years ago ite way Saturday pressure of the every thing be- is are known to t the company it low the reservoir, me just approach- so swept away, al- has spent over ise of steering the mining machine expected to com- week. Id the water back he base and 400 5 110 feet thick at t at the top, f orm- les in length by wide, and 110 feet telegraphic com- of the disas- med. The omin- tn the broken dam people of the val- advantage of and lain has been fall- 1 days past, and i top to bottom by ir. At a late hour letails as to loss of but it is med is very great, storage dam from route is forty ce dam where the I was fifteen miles Immediately on Adjutant General 3 scene of disaster assist the wants of >erintend burial of itative of the Jour- accompanied the pecial courier with 1 take twenty-four the round trip, yly interesteo in >hn McDonald, an jk mine, have just esoris divide, four- the town, from am could be had, s gone without a could be ir powerful glasses >f tbe cliff, while ework of the dam The break in the .tward, leaving the lain break was on stimate yet of the erty, but the latter illions and the loss will bo great, as a ire living near the mons. The confir- f the loss of the big the excitement and is now anxiously Feb. 24. Luther ve some details of the great storage irapa river which ister. like that at to carelessness and poration that built led in to report on and a half ago. It cd with stone four- 5 base, four feet at ith loose rock and ih wooden ilf done when Wag- found the stone urelo'sslr and was akinz the structure ction of sheathing "nded to be secured cement, but done because of sinent to was formed MB and the leakage 41 inches with ia tbe dam. The i f-ill of k no! holes. discharge of the >iat this was ?a-.T. act- a la- BOILEK EXPLOSION. Two Killed and Xtmber Fright- Injured. OMAHA, Neb., Feb. explosion occurred Saturday at tKe Armour-Cudahy packing house at South Omaha, which resulted in the instant death of one man, the subsequent death of another and what may be followed by the death of others. The explosion occurred in the boiler room of the old packing house. A battery of nine boilers is located there, two of which are reserves. The outside boiler of this battery burst, tear- ing great holes in the walls of the machinery department adjoining. The noise of the explosion soon at- tracted the great army of packing house employes to the scene, where beneath the ruins twenty-five men lay wounded. An alarm of fire, was sounded and the fire department soon arrived on the scene, joining forces with the Armour- Cudahy fire department and the two soon quelled the flames. A crowd of 100 men went to work, on the debris, hur- riedly working to relieve the sufferers, and in a short time had the dead and in- jured removed and taken to St. Joseph's Hospital- The following is a list of dead and in- jured: Jack Tighe, head fireman, in- stantly killed: flans Olosen, coal wheeler, died from inhaling hot air; Sam Gibson, burned about the head and face_will probably die; Ed Miskel was taken from the ruins with a fractured skull and severely will die; James Black was severely burned and his skull probably die; James Sheridan was badly scalded about the head and nectc: AI Harder wai scalded and burned, but his injuries are not regarded as serious. Many others were slightly injured anc a number narrowly escaped from the falling walls. The cause of the explo- sion is yet to be determined, but is probable >that the wall of the boiler room caused the explosion by falling on the boiler. The loss reaches many thou sands of dollars. Vote on Selection of a Site Be- gins To-day, Bat a Final Settlement of the Ques- tion May Mot be Beached Until the End of the Week. REMARKABLE SUICIDE. Sexton the "Devil Dream" on the Chimes aad Dashes ULui self From the Steeple. Neb., Feb. remaik able suicide is reported from Wicksville seventy-five miles northwest of here Wicksville, is a town of about 600 population, a church with a set of chimes in the steeple. A young English- man named John Dawson was sexton of the church and played on the chimes. About six weeks ago he had a severe at- tack of the grippe, lie iecovered suffi- ciently to co to work again, but has acted rather strangely and seemed very despondent. Sunday morning in the midst of the service the congregation was startled by hearing the lively strains of the "Devil's Dream" rattled off in the steeple, followed by a heavy fall and Dawson was found lying on the around groaning. Ho was carried into the church, but died in a few moments. Ho had only been in this country a short time. A S25O.OOO Smoke. JKicroioxp, Va., Feb. started here Saturday night in Cameron Siz- er's tobacco factory and soon destroyed the building and contents. The fire de- partment responded promptly, but the flames spread so rapidly it was impossi- ble to save the building and it was only by extraordinary exertions that Kin- ney's cigarette factory, across the street was saved. The loss is estimated at Insurance light. Between of the Different Citlee Competing; for a CoaUn- Seeaion Cntil a DecUloa to Arrive At. "WASHLNGTOX, Feb. all-im- wrtan t matter of selecting a site for World's Fair may occupy all of this week in the House. When the site has been selected the bill suited to the selection will be called up, and as there is consid- erable opposition to its passage the de- late will probably be prolonged and final settlement of the whole question may not be reached before Saturday. Mr. Mills and others have expressed themselves as opposed to the bill in gen- eral, while nearly the whole JSew York delegation objects to the Government appropriation of Even should the fair be given to New York, her rep- resentatives will vote to eliminate this section of the bill. Most of them have pledged themselves to do this. In order not to forfeit the special order giving the matter of selecting a the right of way on Monday, an ar- rangement between the representatives of the four cities will, it is understood, be made, so that if the matter Remains unsettled on Monday evening a recess instead of an adjournment will be taken until Tuesday. This will allow the retention of the special order and the fair matter will have light of way on that day. This arrangement, if effected, will be continued until the site has been Yesterday was a busy one in Congres- sional circles. Tho World's Fair people from New York, Chicago and St. Louis, who are here in full force: were busy all day securing pledges and votes and cal- culating the strength of their respective cities on the first ballot, when the ques- tion of site comes up in the House. The New York people held an informal meet- ing at the Arlington Hotel to hear re- ports, and feel buoyant and confident of ho final outcome and selection of New York. They claim to be able to show eighty votes for their city on the first >allot. The Chicago men claim 100 or sven more than that on the first ballot 'or the site. The St. Louis people ex- >ect to show sixty-five votes, and the tVashington folks are calculating on about forty votes. Mr. Kowell, the chairman of the'Elec- tions Committee, aas two contested cases that he wants to have the House dispose of during the week, but on ac- count of the World's Fair matter he has .ittle hope of accomplishing his object. These cases are those of Atkinson against Pendleton, from the First West Virginia district, and Featherstone against Gate, from the First district o Arkansas. The majority reports of the committee on both cases recommend the of the contestant, a Republican, and the House will adopt tbe reports. RIOTOUS STUDENTS. in4 Sophwnorn of WatNtah College Celebrate Btrtk- by Bach CKA.WFOBDSYHX.B, lad, Feb. Washington's birthday was ushered in Saturday morning by the booming of a Molen cannon in hands of sopho- more class of Wabash College, after which they scaled tho belfry and nailed their banner to the flagstaff on Centre HalL In the UMI eawe class, atounted, paraded atreeta. The freshmen, greater in number, were also oat horseback awd and httded by bratt band. carried nagm and traiuparvnoMa. They net eeveral aad the sophs' were captured, but they retook them In a rush on the oonrt house corner the students belabored each other with nnttnished hickory buggy spokes, with which they were armed. Randolph had to be carried into a drug store to have a gash in the back of his head dressed. Jarton, another freshmen, and Evans, leidenwolf and McCampbell, sophs, were also badly hurt. A soph was based into his boarding house by the reshmen, who were after a flag, and, turning, held them at bay with a re- Not Defaulter. JACKSOX, Miss., Feb. hasty ex- amination has been made by a joint committee of the Legislature of the books and accounts of Colonel Heming- way. ex-State Treasurer. According to the statement made by the committee the State owes Hemingway a little ove and thus the matter stands unti a thorough investigation of the treasur er's auditor's books can be made. DtucharRe In a Strike. A Race and Tax Question. Va., Feb. House of Delegates has passed a bill requiring that in the reassessment this year of land and all other taxables, the asses- sors shall indicate the race of each tax- payer. The object is to show the pro- portion of taxes paid by the negroes. During the last campaign some Demo- crats urged that the negroes should onlv bo allowed, for maintenance of their public schools, the proportion of school tax paid by all their race. The scheme embodied in tho bill iust passed. if carried out. will furnish data upon which a separation of the'schools would be based. ___________ CJrcns Sold. Pittt-.VDEt.rmA. Feb. syndicate of English capitalists who have been negotiating for the purchase of the COSTLY ASSACJLT. Owners of a Theater Mulcted In the Sum of for the Act of an Employe. INDIANAPOLIS, Feb. day of President Cleveland's visit to this city, 3enry Waldron, of Urbana, 111., was icre and went to the Park Theatre. He jot into a dispute with the agent at tbe office over some change, and the agent called upon special officer Kyle to arrest him. Waldron resisted and was brutally clubbed by the officer. Wald- ron filed suit for against Dickson ATalbot, owners of the theatre, and Saturday the trial was concluded, the plaintiff being awarded The held that the theatre managers responsible for Kyle's actions and on tiiis ruling the jury gave damages. BtJULED TREASURE. Discovery of a Backet rilled With Gold and Silver Under the Kutris of a Burned FBKDERICKSBTJBCJ, Va., Feb. day night fire destroyed the dwelling of Luther Limerick, near Falmouth. Op- posite the house is aifeld of about two acres of grass belonging to the Misses which was ignited by a spark from the bouse and also destroyed. Sunday while Mr. Limerick was digging in the ruins, he discovered buried a couple of feet under ground a large tin bucket nearly filled with gold and silver coins, tho. aruownfrof-JKhich will not tell. Some years ago an old hermit died in a hut on the place.__________ Bnrned to Death In a Canal Boat. NEW YORK, Feb. in the cabin of the canal boat A. C. Chandler, lying at the foot of West Sixty-first street, late Saturday night severely burned five persons, one of whom died Sunday. The fire was caused by the explosion of a lamp and the family of Captain Daily, sleeping in the cabin, were not aroused until the fire bad gained considerable headway. Mrs. Daily made heroic efforts to save her children and received severe burns. The youngest child, Dennis, was the last to be removed and was so badly burned that his life could not be saved. Boras Nobleman Exposed. NEW YOHK. Feb. World de- votes several columns to a special from Boston describing the career of "Count" Ivanovitch de Lippman Zubof. who for several months has been lionized by Boston society, but who. according to the World's story, is an iraposter, a swindler and an ex-convict, his correct name being Lippman. Besides swindling many persons in Boston it is stated that he was nearly successful in his effort to au heiress as his wife. FAITH CUBISTS STONED. la the Kateacr ufPraye; AMM1U4 by a Mob aad Driven o OUo WAPAKOXETA, O., Feb. weeks, ago a company of faith cure ad TO cates came to Uaiopolis, this county and commenced advocating their re ligion. Their doctrines did not meec with the approval of the community anc they were given three days in which t< leave the town. They paid no attention to the warning and held their as usual until Friday night, when a mot visited the building during the pragrest of the service, and surrounding th< structure, commenced stoning it. The assembly was broken up, several of the converts injured and the leaden driven from the house and run out ol tbe town. They were not eten given time to collect their wearing apparel. The cause of the trouble was the fact that a young boy, whose parents are de- Tout believers in the faith, broke hij leg and his parents refused medical aid, depending upon their faith to heal the wound. The boy grew gradually worse and died. _______________ BLOWN INTO_THE AIR. Two Negroes Killed Outright itnd Six Serl- In'ured by the Explosion of M Boiler. GOLANSVILIJE, Va., Feb. disas- trous boiler explosion occurred Saturday in Hunter Bros. Co.'s mill, two miles from this place. Two persons were killed outright and six others badly in- jured. Portions of the machinery of the mill were blown to a height of 100 feet in the air and carried over telegraph wires 250 yards from the mill. The victims, all colored men, were employed about the mill. Their names are: James and Henry Johnson. Injured Samuel Fox, leg broken in two places and badly scalded; Jefferson Washington, leg broken and scalded about the face; John Jackson, face and body scalded; Benjamin Bea- nan, found under mill Shed with arm broken and badly scalded about face. The explosion could be heard miles distant. Firing up without sufficient water in the boiler caused the explosion. The mill property is a total wreck; no insurance._______ JOHN JACOB ASTOJR DEAD. LATEST NEWS ITEMS. Catkered ky From all New York's Well-Known Croesus Joins the Silent Majority. NEW YOKK, Fob. Jacob As- tor died at his residence in this city Saturday. Mr. Astor's death was directly due to a cold which he contracted while in Europe in 'December last and with which he had been ill ever since. He was the sixty-seventh year of his age. John Jacob Astor was the eldest son of the late William. Astor and grandson of the original John Jacob Astor, who founded the fortunes of the family. He was the head of the third generation of ijbe Astor family. In 1875 his father died, leaving John Jacob a two-third share of his estate, valued at During the Civil War Mr. Astor went to the front and served with credit as an aide-de-camp to General McClellan. He married a Miss Gibbs. of South Carolina, who died about two years ago. He is succeeded by his only son, William Waldorf Astor, who was Minister to Italy some years ago. Xo. 107 West j executors of consideration Feb. 24.-Onc hundred tnon great Forepaagh show have been routed employed by the Johnson Car Sc.it Com- j from the fleldjijm citizen of rhiladel- pany. whose works arc at Monroe street, arc out on a strike. A j few days ago the foreman wasdis-cJiaryed j lor some unknown reason, and a new man put in his place. Tho aaked for tbe cause of their discharge and, being denied any satis- faction- strcck in a bodj- In RAI.KIOH. N. 0.. Feb. 34- nirht at aidnich at one of the large Govrra- distilleries o' J. K LaaJ'-r. at Sal- isbury, a boiler exploded with frif btfal resalLi. Two mm kiilM, 1 fc- fatallr injured and wrf-ral iajurexL The- to whoso the Forcpaugh estate, in of a princely sum. have transferred the vast circus plant and title of the late Adam Forepaufcb- The purchaser. Mr. Cooper, was the member of tho circus firm of Ooopr A Tbe 
                            

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