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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: February 21, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - February 21, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SAIEM DAILY NEWS. NO. SALEM. OHIO, FRIDAY, FEfeRUARY 21. 1890. TWO CENTS. Executed fa Eternity at Moy- CAftNEGIiTS GIFT. for Wkleh Bands of the COB- facob Schoop and executed in Moy- irsday morning in toparly accredited witness the last istory of two ter- o'clock the offl- )inted to witness led at the prison. >ck Sheriff Krumb- corridor towards >rs following. As cached Cole's cell or creaked on its ;rer emerged for inied by hia spir- steps further and Le. This time the in the death-like ssued forth, was reached the 1 over the men's justed. A moment ung- and both, men of about six feet, minutes the bodies 3 prison physician Ut. I i Schoop was exe- le butchery of An- remains of Schil- y Schoop's partner op, were found by int Park, in the sr After was arrested, edge of the crime, n and made a con- with Schoop and 1 made by Schoop possession of the supposed to have. ng- Schoop arose to the kitchen, rening he had left is gone. At this n. Schoop charged Some words en- :nocked Schilling abbing a knife, was dead. He then placed it in sacks carted to tbe park er pipes. lich Cole suffered 5 one of the most rf crime. On the 83, Walter McAl- the Pennsylvania urdered in bed at Ho had returned d just gone to bed, Thomas Cole, en- ithout any warning head from bis body en left the house rt time afterward me to see him on a little girl in the r'alter was up stairs sister, on reaching mangled corpse, >unded an alarm, 2 capture of Cole, tted with bis vic- the mystery was only defense the at he had q uarreled t the breaking of a j lady from West i young lady could Feb. here Thursday for ife and mother-in- at but tbe ian was again fast- i time the drop fell for which Hop- i penalty was tbe id her mother, Mrs. iV- 33. issv. Per- :inity of tbe foar shots fired ia after ilopkins and ran across stable. He held a 3 and on reaching sbots at his own Ubrair fcy to fubUc With PirrsBuiieH, Feb. The Presjdent vat up early Thursday morning. At o'clock oarriagw; conveyed Presi- dent Harrison, Andrew Carnegie, Gover- nor Beaver and other guests to a special train, by which they were conveyed to Homestead. Several hours were passed in inspecting Carnegie's mammoth steel works at tfcis place. The party returned to the city at one o'clock, after which the floral tendered by Mr. Carnegie to his invited guests took place. From three o'clock until five, the President held a public reception in the court house. At o'clock Andrew Carnegie, ac- companied by President Harrison and the other invited guests, took carriages and were driven to the free library building in Allegheny City. The spa- cious hall was. filled to overflowing. The party -were greeted with thunders of applause. The n-itional hymn "Amer- ica" was rendered by the Society and the audience. Rt. Rev. Cortlandt Whitehead led in prayer. The hymn "The Heavens are Tilling" was sung by the Mozarts and Andrew Carnegie was presented to audience. Mr. Carnegie was almost overcome at the warmth of t.he greeting accorded him and with difficulty delivered a brief address, during which he transferred the golden key of tlio free library build- ing to the keeping of R. T. Pearson, mayor of Allegheny. Mayor Pearson accepted the golden key, replying in a few well chosen remarks. President Harrison was introduced and warmly received. He spoke of Car- negie's gift to the city as the transfer of precious metal into something that blooms for eternity. President Harrison then declared the library open to the public. Enoch Pratt, the well-known philan- thropist of Baltimore, spoke of the bene- fits to be derived. Governor Beaver de- clared that no man could render higher service to his country than had Mr. Carnegie, in that he had dedicated his own self to the good of his fellows. The remarks of Hon. John Dalzell were highly complimentary to Mr. Caraeg Chairman Scott, of the library com- mission, closed the exercises by reading the report of the commission and trana- ferring the deed of the property to the city of Allegheny. The benediction waa pronounced by Bishop Pugh. The Presi- dent and party were driven directly to tho Union Station and left for home at o'clock. It is reported that Andrew Carnegie, in addition to his donation of for a free library, has signified hia inten- tion of purchasing the site for the main building. This means an additional ex- penditure of i The Sawtelle Case. I GREAT FAM.S, N. B Feb. The coroner's jury in tho Sawtelle case com- pleted the taking of evidence yesterday. The testimony as to whether the fatal shot was fired in New Hampshire or in Maine has not been very conclusive, but it is believed that the verdict will be in accordance with the popular impression that the murder occurred in this State, The law requires the verdict to be kept seoret ten days after it is rendered. High Water in the Conemaugh. JOHNSTOWN, Pa., Heavy rains have raised tho two rivers considerable, the Conemaugh being within six inches of overflowing and Stoney croek two feet. A telegram from Shade, twelve miles up the valley, announces that boom at that place, containing an enormous quantity of is liable to break at any time. If this breaks all the wooden bridges on Stoney creek will be destroyed. PRUTS FAIR BILL It Up for Debate HOUM. la tte Claims of New York, Chicago, Louis and Washington Pro- seated by Their Partittas. St iHO A feltara Kelloy la With Cromtm to Blair Hla UM fetaoatloaal BUI. WASHINGTON, Feb. two bills providing for the holding of a World's Fair were called up in the House yes- terday. Mr. Candler, of Massachu- setts, the chairman of the Fair Commit- tee, announced that the committee had agreed to allot two hours to the repre- sentatives of each city represented, for discussion, with two hours for the op- positiou to present its views, and one hour for a general presentation of the case. Mr. Candler outlined the reasons and the necessities for holding a World's Fair and was followed by Mr. Flower, who presented arguments in favor of making New York the site. He was fol- lowed by Messrs. Moore, of New Hamp- shire, and Covert, of New York, who also presented New York's claims. Cum- mings, Tracy and Quinn all spoke In favor of the selection of New York as the site. The argument for Chicago was opened by Mr. Hitt, who was followed by Mr. Adams. Mr. McCreary, of Kentucky, argued in favor of Chicago, saying the three great- est national celebrations ever held in this country had been held in the East, and it was now the turn of the West. Messrs. Cutcheon, of Michigan; Taylor, of Illinois; Perkins, of Kansas, and Chipman, of Michigan, spoke in favor of CHICAGO. Feb. career of J. as aCronin suspect waa ended jsjttarday and the prisoner set at liberty. Salesman Hatfteld, who sold tbe formi- and the real estate clerk, Tbrook- nterton, who rented tbe Clark street flate, failed utterly to identify pris- oner. They both thoug-nt Kftltof about the same size as Simonda, but did not in other particulars resemble him. Chief of Police Marsh asked tbe prisoner if be bad to any trouble or ex- pense, intimating that if he bad suffered financial loss he would be reimbursed. "Oh, answered Kelley. "It is a ease of mistaken identity and I do not harbor any ill feelings toward any one, norean I blame you or your officers. Of oourae this affair has not been pleas- ant to me, but I am perfectly willing to pass it over." MARRIED BY TELEPHONE. Aa Indiana In a Bad Pooltlon the Outgrowth at VoolUtt Act. LAPOBTK, Ind., Feb. Wor- ley, aged twenty-two, telephone ex- change operator at South Bend, and Frank Middle ton, aged twenty-five, same position at Michigan City, became ac- quainted over the wires during their night watches. Finally Middleton pro- posed in fun that they get married by telephone, and Minnie consented. A Michigan City justice was called in and performed the ceremony, but without the necessary State license. This occurred last week, and passed off as a joke. Now it is getting serious, as eminent lawyers say the marriage is legal and binding, but that Justice Dibble is liable to imprisonment for per- forming the ceremony without the nec- Digest of Recent in tho State. THE GENERAL. ASSEMBLY. Feb. SO. -Mr. Patttooa, the sew SMMS- fewtron the Clermont-Browta district, eatend aa earnest protest agaiaat the passage of bills to authorize the increase of total bonded In- debtedness without flnrt (tvtoc in- terested aa opportunity to express their acatl- on the This to Punlftunent by Woman. LA.SSTXG, Mich., Feb. 21. Joseph Platt, of Middleport, N. Y.. who is wanted in that town for the misappro- priation of of his employer's funds, was arrested here Wednesday night at the railroad station. He fled to Canada when the embezzlement became known. A Miss Breeze, with whom he had once planned an elopement, found out his hiding place and decoyed him over tho border. spoke for St Louis, and Mr. Stone, of Missouri, enlarged upon the advantages of the geographical position of St. Louis. Mr. Brecksnridge, of Arkansas; Mr. Dockery, of Missouri, and Mr. Caruth, of Kentucky, favored St. Louis. Mr. McComas, of Maryland, favored an Exposition, but wherever it was held, it should be held in Washington, in the District bearing the name ot the discov- erer of the the District of Columbia, and tho national capital. He invoked the members to seek some high- er motive and broader ground than locality. He appealed to the friends of Chicago, New York and St. Louis to come together in peace, national ground. Mr. Lee, of Virginia, held that Wash- ington was not only the proper, but the only place where the fair should be held. If it was to be we were to invite the governments oi foreign was the proper site. Mr. Coleman. of Louisiana, agued in favor of the selection of Wash- ington, Messrs. Compton and Stock- bridge, of Maryland, urged Washington, the Mecca of American life, where there was no partisan spirit, as the proper place to hold the Exposition. At p m. the House adjourned until to-day, when the debate will be continued. SENATE. The Senate after a breezy debate yes- terday agreed to the resolution calling for information regarding the killing of Deputy Marshal Saunders ia Florida. The Educational bill was again under consideration. In concluding his argu- ment Mr. Blair said the bill had been part of the National Republican plat- form since 1334. It had been incorpor- ated in the platforms of several States. It had been approved by several State Legislatures in quite a numberof North- ern States and in some of the Southern States. It had been approved by Presi- dent Harrison, who had voted twice for it (almost exactly as it now stood) in i 1SS4 and 1SS6. At the conclusion of Mr. Blair's speech Mr. Faulkner obtained the floor to speak on tho bill and the Senate adjourned. South Bend to see his bride, proceedings will probably be instituted unless they agree to live together. Aa Ezeelleat of tTi CHICAGO, Feb. Brunell, of the Players' League, yesterday an- nounced the eight umpires who are to serve the Players' League under the double umpire system during 1890. Their names are: J. H. Gaffney, Wor- cester, Mass.; Robert Ferguson, Brook- lyn; Alonzo Knight, Boston; Robert Matthews, the once famous pitcher, Philadelphia; T. F. Gunning, ex-catcher of the Boston and Athletic clubs, Fall River, Mass.; Charles Jones, ex-out- fielder of the Boston and Cincinnati clubs, NCTV York; W. H. Holbert, ex- catcher, New York, and Ross Barnes, of this city. Shot Big COLUMBUS, O., Feb. afternoon Richard C. White, a private policeman, found his brother-in-law, Achilles Kell, talking to the former's wife near the Davidson Hotel and shot twice in succession at Kell, one or both shots striking Kell in. the left side of the head near the ear, inflicting fatal wounds. Kell, accompanied by Mrs. White, was taken to the hospital. White charges Kell with being too intimate with Mrs. White and that was the cause of the shooting. in I that had killed aad that for thr .Tory CHICAGO. Feb. the oponin? of the jury bribing case yesterday. Jud; Waterman entered an order acquittii Karanaugh. Tte trial of O'Donntll thrn resumed. Several testi- fied to tbo prisoner's food character and reputation and a of others tbat Hoaffland. principal O'lKinn'-lL bad a bad and wouid not TTnton Veteran Kncamptnent. NKWAKK. O., Feb. annual national encampment of the Union Veteran Legion began its session in this city yesterday. Many members of tbe Legion are prcsenL The city is beaati- fully decorated in their honor. Reports of officers for tbe past year show I -5.000. State I branches in The iy every question of was hcl-d at Mcsic Hall. Pot Behind the CHICAGO, Feb. young girls answered an advertisement in Louis- ville, Ky., and engaged to fill vacancies in a Chicago hotel. They arrived here Wednesday and were taken to a vile den at 515 South Clark street. They speedi- ly realized that they had been duped and after much trouble escaped from the place and informed the police, who ar- rested Mme. Maggie Parent, the keeper, and Ophelia Brewer, her housekeeper. In default of bail the women were locked up._______________ An Important Transaction. NEW YORK, Feb. are pending between Mr. Huntington and Mr. Villard for the purchase by Hun- tington of some large tracts of coal lands in the new State of Washington. Tbe details arc not yet made public, but the transaction will be an important one and it will be some time before negotia- tions are completed. It is said that a part of tbe scbeaoe will be the establish- ment of a line of steamers todcrelop tbe traffic. ___ This Legislature. said, has in the past four weeks faoreasod tke local indebtedness of the State KOOiXOOO, a greater increase than was made during the en- rear ieer. Be offered an amendment to a fcul to authorize Gallipolls to borrow HO.flOO for Mhlte improvements, providing that the propo- Stttoa to bond the city should Ant be submitted to a vote of tbe people, but this was defeated the bill passed. Bills were pasted as fol- lowed: To authorize the city council of Xenla transfer funds; providing that It shall require a three-fourths vote of a city oouccil to suspend ttw roles and pass out of Its order an ordinance to lasne bonds; to authorize the trustees of Wathington township. Van Wen County, to Mrry a tax to improve public highways; making appropriations to pay the principal and interest on the public debt. on the irreducible debt and the expenses of the Sinking Fund Commissioners: providing that township trus- tees may deduct fe from the road tax of a prop- erty owner who will erect on his own property, within certain limitations, and keep supplied properly, a public watering trough; to authorize additional expenditures in the construction of free turnpikes in Ottawa County; to increase the bond of the Secretary of State from tollOO.OOO, providing that, in the smaller cities and villages not covered by special act. not more than two of the six members of the board of health shall be practicing physicians; to give township trustees complete authority in the employment of physicians for tbe poor. Sena- tor Soncrant introduced a which provides tfcst the trustees of any township, or the city or village council of any municipality may, by res- in the case of township trustees or ordi- nance m the cast. ot tbe municipal council, make provision for the better regulation of the traffic n intoxicating liquors and may grant to the sa- loon-keepers within their jurisdiction permis- sion to sell ale. beer and native wines and llq- oors (not including whisky) on Sunday between the hours of one and twelve p. m. Senator Ryan introduced a bill extend- big the same authority to city and vtuage councils, but not to township trustees. The Senate passed Mr. Hodge's House bill to give to the widow and children of the late sherlfl Lynch, of Alpena, Mich., his share of the reward for the capture of "Slinky" Morgan. the session opened this morn- teg there were only three bills on the calendar tor third reading, two of which were local. The third bill was an important measure, introduced by Representative McMaken, of Butler. It was passed, and provides: That ftny company oper- ating a railroad over thirty miles m length, in whole or in part within Slate, shall not permit or require any conductor, engineer, flre- man or brakeman on any train who have worked in their respective capacities for twenty-four eonsecutivehours. except In case of accident, to again be required to go on duty or prrform any work until they have had at least eight hours' rest. Twelve hours' labor sball constitute a work, and for every hour In excess of said twelve hours tbat any conductor, engineer, fire- man, bralceman, or any trainman of a company who works tinker directions of a superior, or at request of the company, shall be paid for said extra services in addition to his per diem. Any company violates any of the provisions of the act-.or.aaj offlcet.ajtent who violates any of the provisions of the '.aw, shall be lined not less than ?100 nor nwn than Fhe Senate joint resolution authorizing the Ad- jutant General lo loan tents and camp equipage Bed to provide for the inspection of the Sons of Veterans' encampment wa-, adopted. A number Of the Democrats refused to vote for the reBilu- tlon, which received63 affirmative votes out of members present. Other resolutions adopted were one instructing the House Committee oa to Investigate tbe overflow of lands along tbe Miami and Erie canal in Shelby County and nee what damages resulted to farmers, and it the State is lla be for the same; Senate joint resolution calling Congress to pass a bill providing for the Im- provement of the Cumberland riier. Bills passed. Authorizing tbe council of Gallipolis to issue KQ.OUO in bonds to improve streets and construct sewers; authorizing the commission- ers of Franklin County to issue HO.OOO in bonds lo construct a bridge across the Scioto nver; to authorirc North Baltimore, Wood County, to Issue (35.000 in bonds for the purpose of pur- chasing natural gas territory, .sink wells, etc. R. H. w. Pet-rson, who was awarded the seat from Adams County. In the contest against Mr. was sworn inb> the Speaker. Clerk of the District Conrt. CLEVELAND, Feb. H. F. Carl- ton, la to secretary and treasurer for the Britton Iron and Steel Company, was on Thursday appointed clerk of tbe United States District Court for tbo Northern District of Ohio by Judge Kicks. The clerk for tho United States Circuit Court will not be appointed until Judge How- til K. Jackson visits Cleveland in Octo- ber next, and in the mean time Martin W. Sanders will continue to discharge the duties of this position. Since Judge Ricks received bis appointment Mr. San- lers has filled tne offices of botb the District and Circuit courts. tmt vj. Ky.. Feb. it almost crtaln that cupptned suicide of Lay- tcm. a foal murder, la were uamUtakable a aa4 a which WM scar bcr a to a worthfem characVs- fix- fttniar4 TmtmMKitt. YORK. Ttrcnswick'lWIce billiard j wbitif hanflwrjt- sijrbi. j aa4 a Inportaat Feb. 21. Tbt Circuit Conrt jfxverdaj handed down an opin- ion in the ea.se of John B. Mannii. as- of John It. aad Edward I'urcelL Isaac J. Miller and Gastav Talcl. The court To-nd that Manntx the estate of Edward Par- SW.mr.. and the estate of John It. John HowlanA. Stewart and Michael Walsh_ Manaix. wsJl to naif DYING OFF LIKE SHEEP. rifffctrnl Kavajpw OttMM AMTOJTIO, Tax., Private ten waived Iron the at Mexico state that the frlppe more widespread and in ita ravages there than anywhere   lington for a dinner to be given on 25th inst., by Andrew Carnegie, of burgh, to the President and his inet and delegates to the Pan-American Congress, of which body Mr. Carnegie also a member. Steel menu cards with the name of each guest first engraved and blown in with glass, will be one of the features of the entertainment Covers will be laid for fifty persons. Caaffht While Drunk. DETUOIT, Mich., Feb. 21. Martin Brokman, who was a member of board having charge of the building of a new inrlrmary in Cincinnati about font years ago. and who fled to Canada while under bail on a charge of embezzlement, has been captured by the police here. He has been keeping a grocery in aor, but while intoxicated Wednesday he came over to Detroit and was arrested by detectives who have been watching Sued for i CLEVELAND. Feb. 31. action for fiTi.OOO damage was put ot. trial in tbo United States Circuit Thursday. Tbe plaintiff is Adam Callen ler and thw defendant the rVnnsjlvan.ia Company. Caitcndcr Aapust. received spinal iajurwa in a collision Nilvs while was traveliaj (rook YounrstoT.-a to Now Lraie. at an Feb. ....._ Star line from New York for iats port and Liverpool, ar- Thursday. Captain A at in Uw track and wwpasT. ic T t f '-v iBuwwC _ M i AMMMl< ti. 5 !l 1 I: J r 1 fli   

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