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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: February 18, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - February 18, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SAiEM DAILY NEWS. NO- 41. SALEM. OHIO, TUESDAY, PJBRUARY 18. 1890. TWO CENTS. te in itatlves. Ailing Time for World's Fair the MlnorUj r Code of the House I of the journal, L said that since rats had been pro- approval of the that it contained dictation of the names of members Last Friday a >pted which give ht. Against this d would continue tutional practice. the journal should j form whicn the prescribe. The >ved. immittee on Wai the allowance oi d by the account- sury, was passed, fchof July claims.) ported the resolu- n of the World's Y and Friday and unless the House d by a vote that not be held. ;ed and the result nays 8. Mr. Kil- no quorum. The 172 members were juorum. ted that the rules a means of ascer- f a quorum. After i the Democratic er ignored, he de- ,he motion was in 3 strenuously re- i contended that hat permitted the >rum except dur- aye and nay call, issouri, said that McMillin did not ount by the Speak- by tellers. The he rule provided who voted. The to seemed a.s, said he had re- he had a to whether there wr at all. But he 1 to remain in his 3ns interested to the theory of the he should have re than if he had isult. The trouble lad been wrapped he cords of legal as lifeless as a the question was assed upon by the nstitution. a quo- transact business, sarv for to n disputi-. Since bore it had been d of the country ecedents without led on each side. Jstion was settled present to do bus- was all that jn'as quorum. If they inaction could of who did peaker said: "la counted IP voto and aftff it isfied that the con- prf.wnt to do Tinounc-s that the and that the sno- motion and make and navs .V.. and the -.t a bill v> tijx AN UNFORTUNATE TYPO. Touf h Experience of a Prliter In Twice FaUely Aectued Up hy a Mob to Extort m ConfeMloa. FORT WORTH, Tex., FA. T. Cherry, a printer who arrved here Sun- day night, tells that a fev nights a Bafe at Alvarado was robted of S600, and he, being a stranger in the town, was arrested and placed in jail. The fol- lowing day he was reletsed, as there was no evidence against him. He went from there to Morgan, aid it happened that shortly after his arrival in the town a robbery tool place. He was arrested on suspicion but again released, after which he retured to Alvarado. The people, hearing his arrest and discharge at Morgan, him out and strung him up, demanting a confession. He claimed that he vas innocent and was again strung up, ind the mob fired their pistols in the ai to frighten him. He stoutly mainlined his innocence and after being nearly choked to death was finally released. CLASSIFICATION SCHEMJE. New Greatly Agitated About the World's Fair And the Prospect for Losing the Bif Exposition Through Polit- ical Jealousies. Wfl'LESALlT ARRESTS. of Sharon, Ga., tefor of Pout-office C'lerkg to Obtain Uniform Sralt of Salaries. BOSTON, Feb. Boston Post- ofBce Clerks' Association Sunday be- came a permanent organization, a con- stitution and by-laws being adopted and officers elected. The association was formed for the purpose of obtaining a proper classification of postal clerks, especially in regard to the matter oi salaries. The numbers of the associa- tion seek to obtain the passage of a bill through for a minimum salary of and maxim urn of for clerk in the mailing department, and for em- ployes in the money order, registered letter and stamp departments, where there is more responsibility, salaries from to Saved Murderer from Lynch COLUMBIA. S C., Feb. Satur day night John Hood, the aged fathei of Sheriff Hood, of Chester County, wai shot from ambush and instantly killed There was strong circumstantial evi dence against a negro named Green Brown and he was arrested. A mob ben upon lynching the negro soon collected but Sheriff Hood succeeded in getting the man out of the way of the mob, then telegraphed the Governor asking that the man be taken to Columbia for safe-keeping. The Governor so ordered, and Brown was safely lodged in Colum- bia jail. Escape of an Important Witness. BOSTON, Feb. IS Kellie Smith, an inmate of the lying-in hospital of Miss Dr. Ludgate at Maiden, and one of the most important witnesses against the prisoner in the criminal malpractice cases, escaped from the house late Saturdav night and has not yet been captured. A special officer has been guarding the house since the arrest of Miss Ludgate. to prevent the escape of any of the witnesses, and a special nurse was in charge of Miss Smith, ller escape was doubtless made with the connivance and assistance of this nurse. Preparing for a Riot. OTTAWA, Feb. is every evidence that a serious riot will take place in Hull to-night if Miss Bertha Wright, the evangelist, again attempts to bold her mission service in that city. A large number of volunteers have promised to escort her across the river from this city, fully armed to protect themselves from the Hull mob. From the pulpits of the several Catholic churches a pastoral from the Archbishop was read in Hull Sunday night, request- ing Catholics to refrain from taking any part in the threatened riots Hawaiian Victorious Feb. steamer Zcalandia. from Australia and Honolulu, has arrived. A general election was held on the different islands of the Hawaiian group on February Complete returns had not boon received uo to the timn of the steamer's departure, bat the re- turns, so far as received, indicate the defeat of the present party in power and of the National lU-forai Mowter Meeting Held Which Kecnlted la the Adoption Mr. for m Compromise CommiMion and the Withdrawal of Opposition by Ex-Senator Plait. New YOBK, Feb. Cooper Union Sail was densely crowded last night and hundreds of people were unable to gain admission. The occasion of the throng was a mass meeting to protest against legislative delay in passing the World's Fair bill. Among the promi- nent persons on the platform were War- ner Miller, C. M. Depew, J. H. Starin, James W. Tappen and John Ford. Mr. Starin presided and called upon Mr. Ford, as secretary, to read a series of resolutions, which set forth that the original bill sent to Albany was drawn up by both Democrats and Republicans; that it was a purely business, non-par- tisan measure designed for the benefit of all the people; that this non-political character of the enterprise must be maintained or Congress will not sanction the selection of New York as the site for the fair; that the commission named in the bill is non-partisan; that the committees now in charge, which have been criticized as Democratic, cease to control the project after the commission takes charge, and that there is no rea- son for dragging politics into the matter in any way. The resolutions were un- animously adopted and the andience gave three cheers. Hon. Warner Miller then made a speech, saying he had thought for thirty years that he was a Republican, but had suddenly found that he was regarded by some as a Tammany Democrat, because he was in favor of the World's Fair bill., He found consolation in the fact that he bad been read out of the party in good company C. M. Depew, Elibu Koot, C. N. Bliss, 8. V. R. Gruger and others. Mr. Miller went on to deplore the cry of partisanship that had been raised against the bill. Mr. Miller further the committee on legislation said that was com- posed of seventeen Republicans and eight Democrats and the sub-committee thereof, which drew up the bill, was composed of two Republicans Depew and and one Mr. Whit- so that if the bill was a Tammany plot. Depew and Root were traitors. Mr. Depew also spoke, saying itiat if Columbus had known what trouble this matter was going to cause he never would have discovered America. Mr. Depew went on to say that everybody in St. Louis and "Re- publicans, Mugwumps, Anarchists and on this one point of wanting the fair. It was ed for Now Yorkers to leave Washington call each other bad names at home. He denied that the commission proposed was a partisan one. Other speeches of similar import fol- lowed. Finally John F. Plutnmer ap- peared on the platform and announced that if Mr. Deppw's two-third proposal or compromise wasindorsedby the meet- ing. Mr. Platt would agree to it The question was put and the was heartily indorsed This had the effect of the meeting to a sudden close with three cheers for Thomas C. Platt. While the meetinsr in progress v-ithin ;he hall, the thousands of people outside who had been unable to trot is- si'V- were holding an overflow meeting. this meeting divided into a num- ber of ones listening to some pop- ular orator of local repuf. AuoCTA, Ga., Feb. IS. Monday morainf Deputy Marshal Corbett, of Macon, nd five deputy marshals ap- peared afeharon, Ga., and arrested sev- enteen pominent citizens of the town and couoy, charged with conspiracy and intimidalon against E. L. Duckworth, the appointed postmaster at Shar- on. marshals were armed with Winchester rifles when they began mak- ing the'rrests, but they met with no aistanotand later in the day Marshal Corbett ixstructed his deputies to lay aside rifles, having been assured by those mder arrest and other citizens that parties wo'iVJ accom- pany tkra voluntarily 'he.- or- dered. The tttire party arrived in Augusta last nljbt. They will have a hearing to-day. The warrants are based on, tes- timony, taken by postofflce inspectors, who been at Sharon for several days investigating the case. CO2JUESSIONS REJECTED. _ StrlkinJcMlnerft Offer to Return to Work and Aknowledjre Defeat, but the Pro- posal j. Treated with Contempt. PcrsxjTJTAWNEY, Pa., Feb. other atempt was made yesterday by the miiers of Walston and Adrian to effect i settlement with the Buffalo, Roches'er Pittsburg Coal Company. A comnittee consisting of Knights of Labor taitod on Adrian Iselin at Adrian to lean on what condition the company would illow the men toteturn to work. Iselin faformed the committee that on no conlition whatever would they allowed to resume labor in the minea. The conmittee offered to concede every demant made by them at the beginning- of the strike and acknowledge them- beaten in the conflict, it 'xsompary would allow them to return to work a; rates and conditions similar to those faey were receiving before opera- tions were suspended, but Iselin refused to treat with them. WHITE CAP OUTRAGE. Karjtond Regulators Visit, a Houe and Shoot a White Woman. FBKJERICK, Md., Feb. party of masked men, numbering about thirty and pcsing as White Caps, surrounded the house of Dennis Davis, colored, at Brookiill, a small village six miles from this city, Sunday night, and called for Mrs. febecca Bruchey, a white woman, forty 3ears old who was inside. They accused her of undue intimacy with Davis -and threatened to kill her. She openeithe door a little way when a re- volveiwas nred by some one in the crowd and the in the left breast below the heart. She was seriously and perhaps fatally wounded. None of the parties to the shooting have been identified, nor have the authorities taken any action. Epitome of Events In this State. KILLED ABURGLAR. Determined With Two In (he of One of the Fair. CBKSTUXE, O., Feb. night about nine o'clock a rap came at the door of F. J. Frengle, an aged farmer and his wife, who reside one mile east Of here. A demand to know who knocked aad what was wanted elicited the reply that they had a dispatch for Frengle. opened door and immedi- ately two men rushed past him into the loom and drawing revolTers commanded couple to keep silent under penalty death. One of the men grabbed Frengle and when his wife started to his assistance was seized by the other, and in the Struggle which followed both Freng-le his wife wore thrown to the floor. Frengle reached to his pocket and got revolver, but being prevented from it on the man who held him down, he leveled it upon the one who held Mrs. Frengle and shot him through the heart. The wounded man staggered to his feet and reeled out of the room, but foil dead a few steps from the house. The man who held Frengle then re- leased him and made his escape. The body of the dead man was brought to Crestline Monday morning, where it was viewed by hundreds of people during the day. It is that of a man from thirty- five to thirty-eight years of age, well dressed, as also was the man who es- caped. On the body of the dead man was found a registered letter receipt bearing date of February 13 and the aame of "Mrs. Anna M. Daviny, Beaver Falls, Pa." Freng-le has been in the habit of keeping considerable money in the house and had at the time of the at- tempted burglary about in his possession. THE In Both Branched of the Let-Ulatore. Senate, Feb. Senate met at four p m., Lieutenant Governor Marquis In tue chair Btlls were Introdut ed as follows: To correctan Inconsistency in the civil code and to do away with the requliement for judges to seal bills of exceptions; to make publication according to law equivalent to issuance of summons Bills were passed as follows: To authorize the board of education of Gahanna to borrow 1800 and complete and furnish a school houre; to author- th to Ala.. Feb. first shipment of iron from Alabama to I'itts- burjh was sent from here yesterday. It consists of 3. (KM tons and on nine via the and Ohio t lator (-Icaacat the i in wf tbesteaxer IVrry Kc-lzy. latter tsartr. TerrfMe SAN from the Kio an lality On ranch in County charge is per lower than rail A cos- has made. A bancjwt was last Slight at prwmiS'-nt rocn of and Congressman Chipiuan's Queer Proposal. WASUTSGTOX, Feb. Representa- tive Chipman. of Michigan, has intro- duced in the House a bill for the remu- neration of a Detroit physician for dis- covering a cure for la grippe, The bill recites that this doctor has made a notable discovery in the treatment of sporadic pneumonia and lagrippe, which is of such a nature that it can not protected by patent, and directs that se paid a sum of money as just and suit- able remuneration for his discovery, which shall be made public for the bene- fit of the people of the United States. Only a Family AfT.iir. CnvKr.KSTox, S. C.. Feb. night Napoleon Laval called at the store of B. Feldemann Co. and asked to see his wife, who had been separated from him for some time. When the woman appeared Laval shot her and then shot Fcldemann. Both of the victims thought to be fatally wounded. On bo- ine arrested Laval said that it was only a family affair and that there was noth- ing inoro to be said abaut it. The affair has created a creat sensation. He ftcvtrd Kilrain. XKW Kcli. J. J. Corhe of Olrsjpian Club at San -take Kilrain :a a Ize the board of education or Willlamsburg Cler- mont County, to borrow and repair school building. pet.tion was presented from M. H. Conwaj and citizens of Harrison County, asking for the passage of a, law to pre vent the dojiblc luxation ot mortgaged lands Bills Introduce 1 To oxten the lieu to livery- men for keeping stock, so that they may recover from the sale of an anun.il after it is taken from the stable; for the rebel of R. R. Humphrey, treasurer of Green township Ashland County, funds stolen, to amend Section i92 so as to take iheappDintment of the Columbus Board Elections out of the hands of the Governor and give it to the major; to establish uniform time throughout the State and legalUe so called standard time; making- the ifranrtn? of munici- pal franchises unlawful unless advertised fot sale: taking the right oi tryng contss's for Sla'e and judicial ouicea out of the hands of '.he Senate and putting them into the courts- to authorize Ironton to bonds for street im- provements: to provide that the State shall pay convicts having children to support blxty cents a d.iy. making it a misdemeanor for a husband or father to abandon his family and providing u punishment of three j ears' imprisonment; re quiring common pleas ]udges to appoint boards of visitor..-, to penal and charitable institut'ons n er.ch county it) The State, to appropriate from the State treasury for the erection it Dayton of a memorial to the Davton Zouaves. or the f of the treasurer of Catuvi ba Island Ottawa County, from paying JiOO lo.st by depos tting it w-th one Smith Gave Kcanous for Suiciding. ST. MARY'S. Feb. Cheno- with. twenty-four years of age and mar- ried, shot himself fatally Sunday near the L. E. depot. JUe bad beaten his way from Findlay. and before his suicide had confided his purpose to end his life to a friend named John Woeg- lich. lie left a note to his mother stat- his intention, giving as a reason that ho was without work and could not live with his wife. Tx-ath n Relief. O.. Feb. Mar- tin, the who was so badly in :h- wrt-ck on the 1'an-TTandlc at on the Cth of this month. HORRORS OF MOUMONISM. Sad Told by a from L'tmh HU Property mnd Wife Abducted. BIRMINGHAM. Ala., Feb. Preston, of Clay County, Ala., has turned home from Utah, where he went ten months ago as a convert to MormOtt- ism. He tells a thrilling story of treatment of converts by the Mormona when they reach Utah. He says women converts are married to elders who in most cases have three or four wives already, and if they offer slightest resistance they are flogged or otherwise punished until they submit. The men who have been promised and farms are compelled to give up all the money they have to the church, and then they are turned adrift to live as best they jan. Preston and his youug wife were con- verted to Mormonism about a year ago by two elders who were proselyting Clay County. They sold all they had and went to Utah. Preston says hi9 wife was stolen from him and carried to Salt Lake City, he thinks, but ho was never able to find any trace of her. He was then by threats compelled to give the church all the money he had, about and then he was told ho must look out for himself. Tie started home three months ago and worked his way back. JUST PUNISU3UENT Metrd Out to a u..e Within an loch of His Life. NEWTOWX, Conn., Feb. 13. John Campbell, of this place, was on Sunday night flogged by masked men and is suffering badly. Campbell has been in the habit of beating his wife, an amiable woman, and has once been oon- finod in jail for thrashing her. The couple live in a cottage on the turnpiko and the neighbors say they often heard Campbell beating his wife. Sunday afternoon he struck her on the head with a blunt instrument, making a dan- gerous scalp wound. Mrs. Campbell fled to a neighbor's house, where her wounds were dressed and she was made Comfortable. Late Sunday night four citizens dis- guised and masked entered Campbell's house and dragged him to the street. Campbell's night shirt was torn off and in a nude condition be was lashed to a telegraph pole. The four men then whipped him with rawhides until he be- came unconscious. He was carried back to his house and placed in bed. His cries aroused the neighbors and brought a crowd to the scene, but when they found Campbell was being whipped no resistance was offered. for a purse of Sout Athletic Club last night. Kilrain had knock Corbett out in six rounds, but was at Cwrlftl a triant w- 
                            

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