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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: February 13, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - February 13, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SALEM DAILY NEWS. NO. 37. SALEM. OHIO, THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 13. 1890. TWO CENTS. ot-Box Contract Inquiry- inter Between Ei- iker and liar by in Strong first wit- e House ballot- lesday was Charles nati, who testified BO to Wood at Qov- uest on October 8, r. Hadden the same d him that he had cument. This was t retraction. :er'S request, Qen- jworn. In answer ess said he had no ication in the record hy himself, from had read extracts General Grosvenor It stated that the >svenor) had made sginning of the catn- nore votes to For- man, and that no us to help Foraker r promised to make r Foraker and more ie crowd that sur- The letter further >ell had not intro- distinguished Ohio ave introduced it. stion from Foraker erred to as a distin- publican, the wit- 's causing a s had used the title .r. Halstead called tor.'' hat in his reference ie Republicans with ed and who were ie measure openly, iiibhcan members of Republicans. DEBATE ON THE RULES irson in mind when ice. Forakor asked nembered getting a reading: '-Trust in ill stand by you." iked the witness, said Foraker. e reply, "I have no thing of the sort. It ly to treat a witness, pe any information from I think you n from some consti- ition from private secretary to >r, was the next wit- stioaed by Foraker rsarion in the Gov- caiber 30, 1SS9, with ds. The discussion ch delivered by the 3 ballot-box matter, of the conversation, arising nature. The onel Sands Impressed ie belief that there hind the ballot-box there was a contract 1 had been called to nection with it, and II had gone to see id in relation to the th the President was imocratic leaders to sion of the tariff long ballot-box bill. Lead- mernbers of Congress, had signed the con- the boxes. what he had already how he had been im- He had been severe- rspapers and persons -his matter, on the lotorioos scoundreL er. The moment he >d wasaforfrr be had >ard. He had marked of Wood's testi- 1s trid by bin. He antt. there were Just warrasos- the National of WASHINGTON. Feb. Sher- called up the joint resolution congratulat- ing the people of the United States of Brazil on their adoption of a republican form of govern- it. Tbe reeolut on "The United States of America congratulates the people of Brazil en their just and peaceful assumption of the powers, duties aad responsibilities of self- government based on the free consent of the governed and on their recent adoption of a re- publican form ot government." The joint reso- lution was parsed unanimously. A joint resolution was also passed requesting the President to invite the King of the Hawaiian Inlands to uelect delegates to represent ths King in the Pan-American Congress now assem- bled at Washington At 13-50 the Senate went into secret and at adjourned. House met in continuation of Tuesday's session. Mr. tockery, of Missouri, said the proposed code of rules would relieve Congress of the necessity of repealing taxation, at least so far as the surplus was concerned. He predicted that at the end of the session the surplus would have disappeared by reason of the prodigality welch the rules invited. Mr. Morse of Massachusetts, supported the proposed code and said the Republican majority of tie Fifty-first Confess was as honest and patriotic a badv of as ever assembled at the Capitol and that it wo-j'd bi time enough to charge it with dishonesty and extravagance when the overt act was committed. At the adjourned -.md at noon the session of AVeduehd i> Ttie bar- Ing been reiil. Mr Boutelle, of Mime, asked unanimoua consent that it be approved. The Democrats objected and a roll call was had. The journal was ap jroved. yeas 119, nays 1, tbe Speaker counting 12 Democrats as present and not voting. Mr. McCreary, of Kentucky, entered his pro- test against th 3 new co'V He Slid the Soeaker had defied all precedents .md hail reversed the parliamentary dec SIODS of nearly all former Speakers. He uad n A only erruled Blame, Garfleld, Hawley unrt Conirer but he had over- ruled his own on the floor of the House. The tun" h >d come wnen the House needed rules instead of a ruler and dictator, fatrness and justice instead of communism and Caesarism. Mr Buckalew, of Pennsylvania, the only Dem- ocrat who has voted when present, criticized the proposed rules because they tended to stifle adequate and necessary debate He protested against the rule rc'ative to dilatory motions as being indefinite in its terms, and argued that the clause making 100 a quorum in Committee of the Whole not, only was obnoxious to the Constitution, but would encourage absenteeism. Mr. Cummings, of New York, said that no sanction of the rules could make the act of the Speaker in count.ng a quorum anything but tyranny. If tlie reo-nt were constitu- tional there TBS no noed to sanction them by a code of rules; if ih'V unconstitutional such iction coi'ld .iveta m constitutional. He criticued the lot questioning the motives of membeis in rasxkinR 'he simplest parliamentary m >uon. If the Speaker had the right to determine the motues ot a msmDer, members had a right to determine the motives of the Speaker. Referring to the election cases, Mr. Hender son said that if there w.v? a member on tae floor TT i entitled to his seat the RepuW'cans would stand up and defend his but if ttnre was on the Exciting Scene in the Dominion House of Commons. Civil War Predicted M Outcome of the Disgraceful Affair at HnlL The Canadian Premier HaUx a Stvrm ay Denouncing Attack on Protortut THE NEGRO EXODUS. tm floor a man who held his seat by fraud or red handed raurdcr, taej would unseat him if they had the power. SAVED BY jMSCfpJLDTE. Boys In an Orphan Asylum Escape from the Through the Cool Conduct of Brave Women. NEW Yor.ic, Fcb 13 Catholic .orphan asylum on Fifth avenue and Fifty-first street was damaged by fire to the extent of 530.000 yesterday morning. The 400 boys, inmates of the asylum, all got out in safety. The origin, of the fire is unknown. The boys had just finished breakfast when the fire was first discov- ered and had gone to their rebppctive class rooms. Sister Martha, the Mother Superior, quietly informed her associ- ates that tbe huilding was on fire and they in their turn told the hoys to put aside their hooks and go out into tho yard. The institution is under strict military discipline and the little fellows led by Robert Johnson, a lad of four- teen, vacated the building and filed out into the yard. It took them just two and one-half minutes to retreat. CBOXIN JUKY BRIBERS. Fonr of the Accused I'lead Deferred. CHICAGO, Feb. cases of Alex- ander Hanks. Joseph Konan, Frederick Smith, Mark Solomon, Thomas Kava- naugh, Jeremiah O'Donnell and John Grnbam, charged with conspiracy to bribe the Cronin jury were called up in Judge Waterman's court yesterday. Defendants Hanks. Solomon. Konan and Smith plead guilty and the State's At- torney announced that he would use them as witnesses. The court after in forarinp them that they were liable to the full penalty, said he would hear evidence to determine what mitigating cireuawtanws thrre if any. in their cases. Kavana-jjrh and O'Donne! plead not guilty and the work of recur ju-v was Ix-pin. is. as noiracwof Gfahaai. Ont, Feb. The scene in the House of Commons last night was one of the most exciting ever witnessed there. The riot at Hull Tuesday night was brought up and Mr. Charlton called the attention of the House to that dis- graceful affair. At this point he was ordered to desist by the Speaker on a point of order. Mr. McMullin moved that the Speaker leave the chair and characterised his ruling as that of an in- terested party and wholly unjust. Speaker Quimet, French-Canadian. then allowed Mr. Charlton to continue. He characterized the riot as one of the most disgraceful attacks ever made upon the freedom of speech and universal re- ligious suffrage, A small band of Pro- testant evangelists were stoned, beaten and threatened with death for proclaim- ing the truths of Christian religion, by a howling mob of French-Canadians. The authorities were totally unable to cope with the crowd and the fact that murder was not committed was simply a miracle. This matter demanded the immediate attention of the government. If immediate action was not taken he charged the government with foul in- justice and neglect. Sir John Macdonald, in a rage, charged Mr. Charlton as posing as the champion of a particular religious class. He de- spised such an action, and said if the last speaker had any sincerity he would have formed one of an escort to protect the evangelists. The matter was one wnich could only be dealt with by the government of the province of Quebec. All that was necessary to quell the riot was for two magistrates to sign a requi- sition and all the military of Canada would have turned out to protect the evangelists. He charged Charlton with a desire to raise a disturbance. Mr. Charlton, now thoroughly aroused, rose, but was greeted with perfect storm f abuse. The Speaker ordered him to top speaking, but he refused. A tre- mendous uproar followed and insulting emarks were hurled from one side of he House to the other. Mr. Charlton continuing, said. "Tho utterances of the Premier are false and calculated to cause civil war. If tho government continued, a.n armed Pro- ;estant foice would be raised in Ottawa to clean out the French-Canadians in Hull. CCTOI- '4 to cbairaiaa, TV- wit- "tun WnuMCMlUC Ctrrr AIJ-.A.NY. N. Y_ Feb. alp a trlecram recesve  IXJEKUPTIOX. A C., Feb. A. who is chief of the labor agents at work in North Carolina, ports that he alone has sent (toes out of the He says he never yet put a negTto'on "the train without having a home and labor con- tract provided for him- de- mands for more negroes. Monday and Tuesday were the most exciting the labor agents have ever experienced. Notices of warning are posted at sev- eral towns. One man was driven away while he was endeaxoring to get to'a school house full ol negroes." There are two from the far South still at work here securing negroes. The white peo- ple, they say, do not propose to have the negroes stirred up now when the crops are being put in. The farmers in the northeastern counties are greatly stirred up, and some agents have been threatened with lynching. SWEPT INTO ETERNITY.. Mother, Son and Daughter Thrown Into n River by Landnllde and Drowned. EUGENE, Ore., Feb. has been brought here by the mail carrier from Florence that a landslide occurred on the mountain above the Suislaw river last week, burying the residence of A. F. Andrews and killing Mrs. Andrews, her daughter and little son. Andrews and an older son were thrown into the river, and after floating on the debris all night were picked up several miles below in an almost dying condition. A number of people were driven from their homes by the recent flood and a large amount of property destroyed. The bridge across Lake creek was carried away and a man named Turner drowned. Order a General Shot-Down. ALBANY, N. Y., Feb. meeting of the Eastern Association of Light Straw Wrapping Papier Manufacturers was held here Tuesday, representatives of twelve mills being present. The market was reported as over-supplied aud business exceedingly dull, and there was a unanimous expression of opinion that the manufacture of paper should be stopped for a time. A resolution was adopted requesting an expression of opinion from owners regarding an abso- lute shut-down of all mills in this sec- tion for thirty days.________ A Scheme That 'Win Not Down. BISMAKCK, N- D., Feb. fltandfaig-the fact that the Lottery bill was killed Monday, there is an uneasy feeling that it will come up again in some other form, either in this Legis- lature or in some future session. Its champions are not so badly down in the mouth as one would naturally suppose they would be after their crushing de- feat. Champagne is freely dispensed among the members, and the friends and enemies of the measure are to- gether indulging in an uproarious good time. Colled from the Buckeyedoiu. Field of DREW THE COLOR LINE. THE LEGISLATURE. IB Both of th Awembly. Feb. waa an animated to- in the House this morning orvrthe passage at the Senate bill by Mr. Van Cleat to pay Hon. E. L. Lampson ll.UUO expenses in the contest for the of Lieutenant Governor, and one year's salary, amounting in all to .It reponed back to the Finance Committee with 'a favorable recommendation The discussion that followed was confined entirely to -the DWM' Aratie side of the House. Mr. Donovan niained that the amount had, been reduced the request of Mr. Lampson-. -The bill finally passed by a rote of Hi to 94 nays. Resolutions of District Assembly No. 48, K. 'of U., of Cincinnati, asking Tor the passage of a law to fnrnish tree School books to all pupils of the public schools waa presented and referred to the Committee on Common Schools. Bills passed: Authorizing the commissioners of Pickaway County to issue bonds for 188.000 for payment of bonds issued to cover deficiency in oounty treasury occasioned by defalcation of treasurer Lane; to authorize council of Nlles. Tmrabull County, to transfer KOO from general and from police fund to are department fund; to municipal boards in Cleveland from expending money in excess of receipts; to authorize the councils of cities and villages to license transient dealers: to amend Sections 2364 and 2S74 so as to extend the the Taylor street improvement law relating to intersections to Toledo; to erect and maintain watering troughs on the public hignways: to amend Section J107 and require the p iyeu to in- dorse w xrrants on the county treasurer, to au- thome the electors of Waverly to vote on tho proposition of boring for natural guv to amend Sections 5301 and and extend the tune of fllin? bills of exceptions from thirty to forty days. to amend Section 4030 by classifying tho ages of school youth to conform to the Davis Compulsory Education law. Senate met with President pro tern. Adams in the chair. Lieutenant Governoi Marquis sut beside him, watching and trying to catch the drift of business Bills were passed as follows: Providing for the distribution ot printed copies of the roster of Ohio soMtera in the late war; requir.ng decennial appraisers to notify property owners of the valuation sel on buildings and to ascertain tbe mortgage in- debtedness on land, authorising mutual fire In- surance associations to become mutual flre in- surance companies when their business and as- sets meet the requirements of tbe law for com- panies; requiring that an inventory ot every es tate be filed regardless of the will of the testa- tor; that the residuary legatee be required to nle a bond for the security of heirs in case a will he set aside, and that the prob ite judge ol every county file monthly with the county audi- tor an inventory of all abstracts filed. Bills were introduced as follows. Abolishing the fee system of paying Lucas County officials and fix- ing the annual salaries: to reorganize the mu- nicipal government of Cincinnati creating a Su- perior Council to consist of the eleven elective officers of the city, abolishing boards of alder men, councilraen, education, etc and providing for non-partisan boards, to be chosen by tha Superior Council, for all the departments of mu nicipal government: to provide for county local option. Senator Oren's joint resolution calling on Congress to pass a per diem pension bill was taken from the table and adopted The House amendments to Mr. Van Cleat's bill to compen sate Hon. E. L. Lampson for his services at Lieutenant Governor and for his expenses the Marquis-Lampson contest were concurred in. Feb. br the stennKT Gneiic fire tfc" 4etaiU of a terrible -rolcaaic oJ U Biajfo Jaavarr UK- movataui becui ram- and -of Uw b- away in crrAt Vf of brine forth. in Hani aad rnrth to a A Clone Cmll. CHICAGO, Feb. butcher shop of Christ Ickes at 155 Wells street was slightly damaged by fire Tuesday morn- ing. The flre originated in the rear part of the shop and quickly spread to j the two stories above. These rooms' were occupied by Mrs. Mack and her two children. Mrs. Moore and children and Miss Mack, all colored. Their rooms were filled with smoke when the cries of the children aroused the iri- mates. All narrowly 'escaped asphyxia- tion, but got out of the building unin- jured. %.________________ Cronin MnrdererV BUI of Eireptlons. CHICAGO. Feb. "Wing. TV. S. Forrest and Dan Donahue, attorneys for the convicts, Dan Coughlin. Martin Burke and Patrick O'Sullivan. have de- livered to State's A ttorney Lonffsneckw tbeir bill of exceptions to tbe ruling of the court and verdict of the jury in the Cronin case, on which they will apply Jo Supreme Conrt for a writ of bill is a bnlkr one of 6.000 pages. It will take tbe Attorney about two to go over the record. FOKT Swrrm. Ark-, Feb. IS.-A colored firl Mated Mxttie drowned in rivw tor Bother had cbactUed for ctsminc tbe before at a Tbr mother was taking the Jfvm the and wbra a to tbo the girl broke into tbe watrr Decision Against the Trolley Wire. CISCISXATI. Feb. Judge Taft, oi the Superior Court, yesterday rendered a decision in favor of the Bell Telephone Company against the Mt. Auburn Elec- tric Street Railway Company. The suit was to restrain the railway company from using the Sprague single trolley system of electric motive power, on the ground that induction from the trolley wire practically destroyec the use of telephone wires along the railway line. The court allowed the railway company six months in which to change their present system. Probably Suicided. O., Feb. Coroner Imhofl was called to the vicinity of Arrow- smith's Mills Tuesday evening to take charge of the dead body of an unknown man found there. Deceased was evi- dently a laboring man. short and heavy set, well dressed and between thirty and thirty-five years old. with a lot of keys and in cash in his possession. A rifle with a discharged cartridge was found near by. He was shot in the head, the ball passing clear through. It is not known whether it is a case of suicide or not. Many Indicted. NOKWAUC. O.. Feb. The Huron County grand jury indicted sal oonists by tbe wholesale, Wednesday. Tho char- ges against M. Blatz, E. R. Hirbe, and A. Reuter were for selling to minors and allowing them to play pool, while Nick Smitb. r. Lndwip. Mike Kelley, J. P. Link. Pio5 Hug. J. Licber and Joe MiHer charged with veiling to minors. J. H- Donaldson. A. Frcyer aad C. W. Hale wore indicted for libel. aavisg boon to suit against Rev. Leonard, recently at Kipley. anratpl M O.. Feb. 13. a jKinoner frosn Cayabofca County, wnt rp for grand larceny, and who last week attempted by a and take Ms Bureau oC Printing lor With a Colored Asstetaat. Feb. been considerable excitement in bureau of Engraving and Printing dur- ing the past woelc over the appointment of Miss Frank Flood, a young colored. girl, to a position as assistant to Miss Flood was first attigned, as assistant to a printer named Johnson, and he promptly refused" to work press with the colored girl as an? assist- ant. Subsequently another pressman, named Levi refused to work with' tiMf colored assistant. Johnson and Levi were given the al- ternative of resigning or being dismissed, for refusing to work with the girl, an3L they choose the latter. The "p'rewe's formerly run by thpse two been given to substitutes who' have regular assistants whom Captain Mere- dith, chief of the Bureau, does not in- tend to displace to make room for Miss- Flood, but he declares he will appoint- her to the first vacancy which occurs, and if other presbmen refuse to work with the girl, they too will bo TURFMEX'S COXGKESS. Celebrated Horsoi Temporarily Barred From the Itace Elected for the JinsuInK .BUFFALO, N Y., Feb. the turf- men's congress yesterday a resolution, was adopted that whereas the board ot review had been restrained by the court from investigating the fraud against Nelson. ?Toble and Robins ariS. toe stallions Nelson and Alcryon, there- fore the said parties and horses are here- by suspended from all privileges on courses in membership with the associ- ation until said injunctions are dis- solved and the charges investigated. The committee on rules made' its' re- port. Among the important amend- ments adopted was one that a record to a road wagon is a bar to races of every character. The following officers elected. President, P. P. Johnston, ot Lexington; first vice president, David Bonner, Now York, second vice presi- dent, W. W. Stowe, San Francisco. _New York was selected as the place of meet- ing in 1392. RETRIBUTION. Wife Murderer Kane I'ayo the Death Pen- alty on the Scaffold for HU Crime. TOBONTO, Ont., Feb. 13. Thomas Kane, the wife murderer, was hanged in the Toronto jail Wednesday morning? He met his death stolidly, "walking Drith a steady step and a calm countenance to> the scaffold. In sixteen minutes from the time the trap was sprung Kane waft dead. The condemned man spent hislast night on earth in prayer and devotion with his spiritual advisers. To father Cruise, Kane made his confes- sion, which will probably never be mada public. The crime for which Kane paid tha death penalty was committed on Jfovem- bsr 17 last. His wife was found bru- tally murdered and Kane was found in a> drunken stupor. He claimed up to tha last moment to have been so drunk on. the night of the crime that he knew nothing of what had occurred and pro- tested his innocence of having killed his wife. Will the Jminigrittiuil WASin.vGToy, Feb. is. Secretary AVindom and Solicitor Heoburn left Washington yesterday for New York. They will remain several days and dur- 4ig their stay will give special attention to the immigration question that tha Secretary has had under consideration for weeks past. He will visit both (Gov- ernor's Island and Bedloe's Island dur- ing his stay, also Castle Garden, and tha advantages presented by each will large- ly influence him in deciding which to Select as an immigrant station. Ball Mnnagcra' Cmclave. NEW YORK. Feb. Ma- trie, of tbe New York Base Ball Club; Brady, of the Jersey Citjs: Trott ot Newark, and Powers, of Rochester, all in the city yesterday. They met and talked over tbe prospects for the opea- ing of tbe Tbe new grounds in this city arc being posited forward and already one can get idea of what they will look like. In Mfcrtyr i XKW VOUK. Feb. pijrhtj-nrtt of birthday of Linmln oosimcJnorafed by tbe Ilrpnblican night at axmico'a. There a Urge Tbe hall <3rcoraV-4 mnd portraits of ap- Jlasj a ff'tl tke aad wait iw- and rarth fvjl nl a HT WJ'V of Crlrlcwtn. it t. JH., iii fi' Tut.': tutwl' fl. I il It.M t f L n" .1 v'T.i mr v.w TmtwC mil m "ijupfanmlv -v m n i   

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