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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: February 12, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - February 12, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SALEM DAILY NEWS. SALEM. OHIO, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12. 1890. TWO CENTS. utlines Plans by Ea- it ion Between Offices. U Direct Op- >f the Service. 12. Postmaster ippeared before x Postoffices and id read an elab- of a system of Wanamaker said ased on the four ntroduced in the ie same subject, satisfactory. e experiment by jraph, communi- )0 free delivery ad to gradually jailer offices. A ,ges could not be teved that tho for ten years on he did not think ,ablished on the 5e, but it could a point. He had e by itself would e Postoffico De- le additional de- ring two cents answer to ques- f the committee, it the establish- ph system would because of the ire is no guaran- res. The scheme position to any cause the deliv- an that of mes- e telegraph com- ral was of opin- n to use postal or the proposed sful. In a great lyes assigned to green, but he Lnd a number of rice who under- alegraph instru- ir of salary he rator would not 3 ordinary clerk." lie said the rate is about the same rate in England. losition to limit s, Mr. Wanamak- 3ral members of 1 his reasons for ing. He replied that every thing g. The 400 offices gin with and the 5ed at the discre- ;nt. He thought (ft with the Post- for the rea- Leemed arbitrary. THE TRACK. he Wisconsin Cen- Injured. disastrous >rday on the Wis- ar Mcllen .Tunc- uth of this place. obtain, but it is persons were in- m not be learned rain wrecked was merexpress, leav- in the morning train was run- of speed when. and two rn from the track. i'-s for an instant 1-vly over. The v.-os sprcad- a dozen nnci w.-rc ii fatallv. FIFTY-FIRST CONGRESS. JB Uneventful Day la Both Senate and IIoosc. WABHUGTOK, Feb. morning hour yesterday the Senate passed bill appropriating JlOO.iMO for a public building at Burlington, la., and the Senate bill lor the relief of certain settlers on the public lands. The Oklahoma bill was again taken up, the pending question beinj; the amendment of Mr. Plumb to Include No Man's Land in the pro posed Territory. Mr. Vest made an argument la favor of the amendment. Mr. Platt said thai Mr. Vest's earaestness was due to his desire to see the Cherokee outlet lying between the Oklahoma country and No Man's Land opened to so'tleine it. Ho believed that the outlet would be o jined at the present session of Congress, but wiien that was done it would be time to talk of including it and No Mail's Land in Oklahoma. The bill went ovr without on the amendment, -The Senate then took up the Edu- cational bill and Mr. Ulair 'ejujitd hs speech in support uiil- V.'uhiut confiding his speech Mr. tflnir yielded '.o a motiou to proceed to executive busu-ei--. nud after .1 secret session the Senate Adjourned. jtuinal of Morday's pro -eedings was approved by .1 vote ol 1501) Speaker counting a quorum. Mr. Ci.'n-'o.i called ui> the proposed code of an 1 o ;i resolution providing that general s' all at one o'clock tu-day and ihu. after uebat-under the nve-m uute rule, the p-evioup qu -t on shall be ordered at four o'cl.-i '.i Prou ".a were made against cutting oft <1: m su-jh but without avail, nvJ Mr Cannon the previous qves'ion demand wxs rejected by an overwhe IE rg vote. Mr Springer imm'.d'.itely claimed the floor, but Mr. Cannon de -Kned to Yield it. Mr. Can non then c-illeO- for the aud nays on his demand for the previous que-tiou. A sufficient number of meir.be-s faile! 10 arise to enforce this demand, an 11 v Speak r announced. Mr. Holmaacha-a -ter.y.e-l the proposed code aa be'ng a r in parliamentary procedure. He declared that the clause p ond- uis; that 100 UiSmbjrs nhail constitute a quorum In Committee of iLe UTiole would place the great appropriation bills at the merey of a handful of the niaiority spoke of the vari- ous occasions upon n-hic-h the resort to filibus- tering had been beneficial to the ctyntry and referred with much einpbiisis to the defeat o! the Force bill by tie under the lead ol Samuel J. Rard ill. Mr. Mason, of luiao s defended'he proposed code argued ibe of roles which would give to th3 majority the power to take affirmative action. Mr. McAdoo, of New Jersey, antagonized the rules, as giving to the Soeuke'r the nyht to judge the conscience of a member and to impugn his personal honor, as wcL as to restr ci his per- sonal rights. Penditg further debate the House adjourned ______ DJEATH BY ELECT1UCITY. The Apparatus for the Evecntion of Sew York Criminals Pronounced Perfect. ALBANY, N. Y., Feb. com- mission to test the electrical apparatus in State prisons will make their report to-d ay to Suporin tendon t of State Prisons Lathrop. The ronort will say that the questions to be solved were whether the apparatus would kill and also what num- ber of volts were necessary and what kind of wire should bo used. It was found that German silver wire proved to be the best and that about 900 volts was the maximum needed for horses and large aniimils, and about 400 volts the maximum for small animals. At Auburn a horse and cat were suc- cessfully experimenterl upon and efforts made by Dr. Fell, of Buffalo, by the aid of improved machinery, to resuscitate the animal failed entirely, thus proving conclusively that it was not a case of suspended animati'jn. The committee find that in their opinion each one of the apparatuses can be used successfully and that death by electricity can be accomplished within four seconds. There is in their opinion no cause for imagining that there will ever be any failure of results. Xot Tet TCeaely to Meet Snlllvan. NEW YORK. Feb. Barnett, John L. Sullivan's manager, yesterday made an offer to Peter Jackson that if the latter would stand before the cham- pion three rounds at Cronheim's Theatre. Hoboken. this evening, he might have Sullivan's share of tho re- ceipts, which, it is estimated, will amount to Jackson declined the offer and said ht- was sur- prised that Sullivan should have made It. "When he is out of his trouble with "the Mississippi authorities." said Jack- son. "I hope to meet him in a finish fiirht. and shall try to prove myself a worthv foe-." A Disgraceftil Affair In the City of Hull. Protestant Evangelists Assaulted by a Mob of Catholics. and 8t< to a Six Persona Wounded, Seriously. OTTAWA, Ont., Feb. night the city of Hull, across the Ottawa river from here, was the scene of one of the most disgraceful riots ever chronicled in Canada, A small band of Protestant evangelists from Ottawa were attacked by a howling mob of nearly a thousand French-Canadians who were armed with revolvers, shotguns, sticks and stones. Six. persons were seri- ously. It appears that the evangelists, some twenty in number, including four or five ladies, some time ago announced that they would hold evangelical servi- ces in Hull, which is inhabited almost entirely by French Roman Catholics. They were warned that serious trouble woule result, but in spite of the warning visited that city last evening and began religious services in a small mission hall. In another portion of the city a crowd of the roughest characters in the city congregated and marched through the streets, armed with revolvers, shotguns and all kinds of missiles. The crowd in- creased in numbers with great rapidity until they reached the street in front of the mission hall, where over a thou- sand of the infuriated crowd hung about the building, swearing vengeance on the little band inside. The police were powerless to disperse the mob. The mayor and two aldermen who tried to address the crowd were stoned and se- verely injured. The appearance of the evangelists a1 a window was the signal for a shower o1 stones. Doors and windows were demol- ished and the howling mob rushed in, firing their revolvers as they went. Sis of the evangelists, including two ladies, were seriously, if not fatally injured The remainder escaped through'a back window aad beat a hasty retreat to Ot- tawa. The outrage has created tremendous excitement here and tho prompt action of the police alone prevented an armed force of Protestant citizens of this city from wreaking vengeance on the French- Canadians. The matter will be brought up in Par- liament to-day. The militia have orders to turn out at a moment's notice to pre- vent further trouble. WORKED FOB BOODLJ2. A DELICATE QUESTION. ronim C. A. K. Knmnpntenfc. SIIAMWKIN. T.I.. Feb. (Jranil Army of tbo lU-public's twenty-fourth annual StaV.- encampment bTeycs- i Thomas -I. Svwart. IV-partKicnt i Commander. of which Hazard, of Secretary Windom Asked to Decide as to Whether a Famous Vienna Orchestra Can Vlay In America Without Violat- ing the Law. WASSTXOTOX, Feb. 12. Secretary TVindom has been called upon to decide a very delicate question and his decision, when rendered, will be of great interest to musicians, for it will defi.no the line of demarcation as to where a musician ends and an artist begins. The collector at New York desires to be informed whether he can admit the members ol the famous Strauss orchestra, of Vienna, to this country without violating the Alien Contract Labor law. This orchestra is booked for a six month's concert tour in this country, commending in May next, and Mr. Strauss has asked if his orchestra can be permitted to do so. The members, i is conceded, are under contract to re- ceive a stipulated sum each week. Un der the Contract Labor law only profes- sional actors ana artists can here under contract. Mr. Haddeu About HU With Wood. WASHINGTON, Feb. Ohio bal- lot-box investigating -committee con- tinued its examination Tuesday. Mr. Sadden stated that be bad paid money to Mrs. Wood. He had a letter from Mr. Wood to the effect that he was bard at work in Washington on a gun contract and requesting him to jet and give Mrs. Wood of it Shortly after this incident Mrs. Wood and her son called at his house and pre- sented a letter of similar character from Wood, in which was enclosed a letter to his wife. This was the first time he had seen Mrs. Wood. He had not the money at the time and requested Mrs. Wood to call at his office. In the meantime he consulted Dr. Graydon respecting the matter. The doctor advised him to ad- vance the money, stating that he woulA be responsible for the amount. Witness told of his visit to the Com- mercial-Gazette office on the night that Mr. Halstead became convinced that the paper was a forgery. Some days after paying the first amount of money to Mrs. Wood, the lady called at his house and told his wife to have him call at her house, as she wanted to see him on a very important matter. He supposed that this would be another request for njoney and he again consulted Dr. Gray- don as to what was tho best thing to do. Dr. Graydon advised him to see Mrs. Wood and if she did not want too much money to supply it, and gave him This money he gave to Mrs. Wood and told her not to ask him for more. He did not pay her any more until after Wood was ariested, when he gave her ______________ DISAPPOINTED BOOMERS Would-be Settlers on me Sioux Reserva- tion Back by PIKKRE, S. D., Feb. situation here remains unchanged, although the excitement has somewhat abated. 5 attempts were made yesterday to effect a crossing. In some instances the boom ers effected a landing, but were quickly pursued by troops and Indian police anc brought back, quarters being given them in the guard house. People living on the Mile Square are not allowed to leave Under any circumstances, and are run ning short of provisions. Much indig nation is expressed that President Har rison shouldissue his proclamation open ing the reservation and then not giv< orders either withdrawing the troops o instructing them to abstain from inter loring. ______________ Charged With Murder, Frazier, aged twenty-two years, residin: fi ve miles from Keeseville, was arreste Tuesday on suspicion of being the mur derer of Mrs. Floyd, at Westport, Fr day night last. recovering con sciousness, Mr. Floyd made a statemen to the sheriff .that he was certain tha he knew the murderer's voice and tha he was a former farm hand employed b him. The prisoner has worked for tb Floyds, but claims that he was not a Weetport and can prove that he attende< a skow at Keeseville Friday night an drove home with a friend immediatel after the performance. Sr.ia.1 12.-G. for the naim XKW Fob. The examina- tion of ex-presid'-nt of tin Sixth National Kank. was continued yesterday. Itank Examiner Hepburn his that tbr- in W-TO missing .ind v.ij efforts of and to ;.bfctn '..tie of banking boura df faulting Linrxtln Nauonai Kaak. K. K. Kard. h F. W. Huil. day a.nd Recent Occurrences Among the People of Ohio. THE GENERAt ASSEMBLY. BUU and Introduced la and House of Feb. Qoreroor Mar- inm was present In the Senate chamber for the Inttime. but aid cot take the presidential chair, as he wished to watch proceedings for a few days and get the run of before attempting to preside. Hon. John M. Patison, the new Senator from The Fourth district, took His seat. Bills were passed as follows: To au- thorize the board ot education of Mtndon dis- trict. Mercer County, to levy an additional tax; to pay to Mrs. T. Q. Ashtmrn JflOO, the salary of tier deceased husband for one year: to prohibit outgoing school boards employing tcajhera in townships for the ensuing fiscal y.ear; making partial appropriations for three-fourths of the Bscal year ending r'ebruarv authorizing the Council of Zanesville to appropriate not more than Jl.OOO to sink a well in search of nat- ural gas; to apcropriate to pay the clerks. sergeuni.s-at-a.mi and other employes of the Bouse and Secate. The Senate confirmed tha appointment by the Governor of Charles N. Bchmlck as a trustee of the Cleveland Asylum for the Insane.- Senator Van Cleaf offered the following resolut on, which was unanimously adopted: Whereas, It is reported that Jennie Whiti'head, un inmate of the Institution for Feeble Minded Youth, while in a bath tub on the 6th inst., in chargs of another imbecile in- mate of the institution, was so badly scalded as to cause her death, therefore, Resolved, That the Committee on Soldiers' and Sailors' Orph ans1 Home and Institution for Imbecile Youth, of the Semite, be and are hereby directed and empowered to Investigate the death of Jennie WUitehead and report the facts in the case to the Senate without delay. In the afternoon ex Governor Cumback, of Indiana, wns present In the Senate chamber and the Senate recessed five minutes in his honor. He spoke a few words from the President's chair. At the close of the session Lieutenant Governor Marqn's was called to the chair. He put a motion to adjourn, which was earned. entire forenoon sess'on was con- sumed in the consideration ol Mr. Williams' bill to amend section so as to allow pay- ment, by county commissioners of claims for killed by dogs, upon the affidavit of two residents in the neighborhood of the place where killed. The bill Is intended to do away with the necessity for the farmers to take witnesses to the county seat to establish their claim. A num- ber of amendments were offered, but the author successfully fought them, and forced a vote on the bill without any material change from Its original form, and it was lost. Bills passed: To authorize the board of education of Gehenna school district. Franklin County, to issue bonds in the sum of (SOO to complete and furnish i School house; authorizing the o! Crawford County to transfer from the to the agricultural society fund; to pay Mrs. T. Q. Ashbura, widow of the late Senator MOO. the amount of one year's salary authorizing Canton to issue in bonds to construct an improved system of sewerage. SA5TS IT WAS TRUJB. Testimony Concerning Money Paid Woo< Out of Campaign Confirmed by a Leading Politician. CINCINXA.TI, Feb. Graydon was asked Tuesday afternoon what he had to say concerning Mr. Hadden's tes- timony in the ballot-box investigation "It is all said he, "the money paid -co Wood came out of the campaign fund. You see we were close on to the election. There was great fear that this fellow would be captured by the enemy We had sufficiently learned his charac ter to know that the truth was not in him and we wished to keep possession of him till the ballots were counted We believed the Democrats were tryin to gain his friendship and trying to ge him to make some sort of a confession so we took care of biro. By helping him financially he stayed with our side." Ohio's Youngest Soldier. CIRCT..EVII.I.E, Feb. 12. Pickawa County, in the person of Joseph Fissell now a resident of Cincinnati, claim the distinction of having furnished th  Now York yesVruay Washington. Hij attempt t-o buy the fraiv was notas successful as be I prpaolifd in the morning and P. IJ. wish, still bo not np bojx-.! Smith. ciTr. read a historical of th'- pajusr in In evening- still of 'bf that inusl; Johnson, of IV-troit. an in way of rvducinc th" address. wssion will conclude to- fr-r   ing the only one to vote against him. AN EXILE'S SUICIDE. Preferring Death to Dishonor. Beauti- ful and Talented Woman Takes Poison. PAKIS, Feb. refugees in this city have received a cipher dated Kara, Eastern Siberia. Decembei 28, stating that Madame Sibida, a ladj of noble birth, and lately a school teacher in Moscow, who is serving oul a penal sentence for being found the possession of revolutionary   dence of Robert Barclay and ing him, his two children and Robert Brown. Barclay and his children wert extricated with difficulty, but was killed by the falling timbers. Win'Call an Extra DES MOINBS, la., Feb. bal- lots for Speaker were had in the Houso Tuesday, each one resulting: LI a mil ton 3o. Wilson 35. The probability is that an adjournment will be had without anything being done, and then Governer Larrabee will call an extra session for the purpose of seating Governor Boies, passing tho appropriation bills, fixing- the joint freight rates and considering tho prohibitory law. Corset Strike Settled. NKW U.AVEX. Con.. Feb. striko of the corset stitchers at Meyer, Strouse vtCo's factory was amicably set- tled Tuesday and the girls will re- sume work They accept ono- half the reduction first proposed and tbo firm airreo to run the machinery fifteen per cent, faster and to submit the ques- tion of the compulsory benefit assess- ment ton. TOT- of employes. Won the Match All thr- L. 1- Fob. last ot the psgeon matches for SI-OTO each, and 5T..OOO a sMe additional on main: 2W birds, bctwectt C. Macal'-sv-rr. of and Knapp. of York. resulted fol- Knapp JciH-d K.2: Knapp ]o51 four all Vhe JJany v bands Ib" rowli natch.   

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