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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: February 3, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - February 3, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SALEM DAILY NEWS. NO. 28. SALEM. OHIO, MONDAY. FEBRUARY 3. 1890. TWO CENTS. A WftECKEttS IN JAIL. the men. on Continued, bat y Scenes of sion. After Conftldera- reeu the Mr. McMillan, he first gun for the use Saturday. The journal omitted the  ved and demanded n. ready with his mo- rbich he proceeded ed by Speaker Reed ,t ''The gentleman h. t a motion to ad- batable." As Mr. was in order the id ordered the yeas oil call the Demo- result was that the 135, nays e previous question motion to approve noxt step, and on demanded the yeas i ordered. The Dem- te and the Speaker1 les. vas announced Mr. i, asked if it was not announced. The e time occupied pre- ement. te was taken on Mr. for the approval of Speaker counted in :nt and not voting irnal approved. Sev- e on their feet with ries, but Mr. Rowell, lirman of the Elec- ted up the Smith- e. Mr. Crisp raised ideration, which the ntertain. He then yhich the Speaker tertain. Mr. Crisp er protest, to sub- DOitof the Electious d read a resolution >u the right to his that the calling up son case in the ab- t rules was unparlia- 3en decided on by a Mr. Rowell re- ft received verbal no- had not considered nitted this, but held ewspapers had pub- he caucus, to the ef- ihad been taken, de a statement re- gs of the Committee Mr. Carlisle replied t any time to discuss i floor of the House. plied that the com- ported rules, be- areful consideration, time.' (Groans sumed his argument s. and in concluding delay in bringing in Committee on Rules e on the part of the 3at a sufficient num- enable them to pass thout any serious in- minority. Ir. Crisp's arjrnment o floor in support of He supported the lith is entitled to the ion. the sitting mem- LOSS BY FIRE. Danbary, Conn., Visited by an Extensive Escapes From Death by Suflocation. DAXBUKY, Conn., Feb. o'clock Sunday morning fire was dis- covered in the basement of Samuel Har- ris' clothing store at Liberty and Main streets, and before the flames could be extinguished the furniture store of Hull Rogers was also burning. The fire- men gutted the lower part of both build- ings, but after they thought their work done it was found that the fire had crept to the upper stories and was making rapid headway. In a short time the buildings adjoining, occupied by George R. Stevens, art materials, and T. P. Hoyt Co., groceries, were also ablaze, and despite the efforts of the firemen all the affected buildings were soon con- sumed. The four-story brick structure adjoin- ing Hull Rogers' block was badly damaged by fire and water. Tho total loss is estimated at The insur- ance, so far as known, amounts to 000. There were several narrow escapes from death, many of the occupants of the flats the stores being taken from their rooms almost suffocated. ALL IS LOVELY. I finished, there was i made on the Demo- "as voted down viva of Virginia, began an argument 's right to tho seat an hour, ho sug- llowcd to finish his 'day, and that the Several Republicans ai) was dirc-cied by with his re- r. b" askt-d to Ave iSJW-lf V> 7" ia th' Examination of the of the Treas- urer of tho Irish National League Shows Everything: Correct and Satisfactory. DETROIT, Mich., Feb. report of the auditing committee of the Irish National League has been made. The committee says: "We found a model of books kept by the treasurer. They consisted of a cash book in which the daily receipts of moneys were en- tered, giving the name of the party re- mitting, the name of the organization (if any) raising the money and the date and name of the place from which the remittance came." The committee then goes on to say that the accounts and correspondence of the doctor were kept in a clear and orderly style and that every thing is in legal and proper shape. The remit- tances to Ireland were A Base Ball Humor. NEW YOKK, Feb. afternoon paper says that at least five of tho Indi- anapolis base ball nine will play with the New York League team this sea- son. Jack Glasscock and Jerry Denny, it is stated, are among tho quintet. With the five western men as a neuclus, the New York management calculates on getting together a presentable nine to take the place of the Giants of last season. The men will join tho New Yorks on their southern trip, according to the story. President Brush, of the Indianapolis nine, denies the truth of tfce statement.____________ Ask for Legislation. Feb. conven- tion of the Post-office Clerks' Associa- tion of the United States will meet here to-day. The delegates will represent first class post-office in the country. Much needed reforms in the laws af- fecting the clerks will be embodied, in bills to present to Congress. The two principal subjects that will be discussed will be the Eight-Hour law and the an- nual leave of absence granted clerks. An Early Moraine Fire Number of In a Trap Frott Which There No Outlet. BOSTOX Feb. after mid- night yesterday morning the dwelling house 259-261 North street, occupied by Maurice Rubey's clothing store on the first floor and by lodgers, chiefly Italian families, on the three upper floors, was gutted by fire, which is supposed to have originated in the store. The flames speedily cut off escape by the stairways and the inmates of the building had no means of saving their lives except by jumping from windows. Ten persons were burned to death, three were fatally injured and six were seriously if not fatally injured. Before the fire was discovered it had reached the staircase and was feeding upon the dry wooden stairs and rapidly spreading toward the roof. The sleep- ing lodgers were aroused in confusion and some were bewildered and at once succumbed to the deadly smoke. Others attempted to flee Awn the burning stairway and fell victims to the flames, while still others leaped from the win- dows to meet death or mutilation from contact with tho pavement. When the firemen arrived they quick ly extinguished the fire and rescued those of the inmates who had managed, by hanging out of windows or taking refuge on the roof, to escape the deadb smoke and flame. The shrieks ant prayers of the terrified people were mingled with the cries and groans of the injured, and the scene was a terrible one. In a few moments, however, th imprisoned people had taken down the ladders, the injured removed to hos pitals and the dead ta the station house It was then found that ten person had been burned to All of thei bodies were found huddled together on the top floor, they having fled irom th lower rooms when they first discoverer the fire, the flames having already cut off escape by the stairway to the lower floor. It is suspected that the fire was started for insurance on the store. A man named Benjamin Simonds has been ar- rested on suspicion. There is another story of the origin of the fire. It is said that during a drunken row over cards one man threw a lighted lamp at another and thus started the fire. The following is be- lieved to bo a correct list of the dead: Bella Scanlon, forty years, a widow; Madelma Ciarlone, fifty-one years; Phil- omena Ciarlone, thirty years, wife of Pasquale Ciarlone; Giovanni Ciarlone, eleven years, son of Philomena Ciarlone; Pasqualena Ciarlone, five years, daugh- ter of Philomena Ciarlooe; Felix Contia, thirty years, a barber, and single; Mar- tino Marcbione, thirty-five years; Rosa March ione, thirty years, wife of the last Emily Marchione, seven years, daughter of Martino Marchione; Raffalo Petrilizio, forty-two years, a laborer.- BONFUBLIXS BLAST. Party In Ctah for mm Bxtentfve Election LAKE CITY, Utah, Feb. Bonfleld, of Chicago, in an In tor- Saturday with editor Dougal, of the Deseret News replied to the. charges that there WAS a Mormon plot to implicate the leaders of the Lib- iral (anti-Mormon) party, through de- tectives, in a variety of scandals and thereby defeat the Liberal party at the coming elections. Bonfleld said he came here last No- vember at the instance of a number of gentlemen who feared that the frauds at she Ogden City election would be re- peated here. He was requested to do nothing more than obtain proofs of elec- tion frauds. He found that the Liberals meant to carry the election and em- ployed detectives to obtain evidence of fraud. Many instances of illegal regis- tration and colonization of voters were discovered and hundreds of non-resi- dents had their names added to the reg- istry lists._______________ BUTCHERY. BUKNED LIKE TINDJEll. FIGHT IN A CEMETERY. tit BALTIMOKK. Feb. S. Mat- thews, one of tho tnost prominent aad lawyers in the South, dropped dead i froaj heart in a horse car on d from Howard street Saturday niffht. He was the sonjiag town from bis home, aad j wfaxsn car reached Jonas Hopkins 5jjis j tTnrwsJtv Mr, Matthews" bead was ob- i to drop forward Bpoa bis JHedicd MX-viJ Befaoe to Permit Dislnter- ment of ItixlIeK and a Little Kiot Ea- gues. NICHOLASTILLE, Ky., Feb. Martin, the proprietor of the cemetery for colored people, has been selling lots for burial purposes for years. Recently the attorneys for the Richmond, Nich- olasville, Irvine Beattyville railroad needed a strip of ground 66 feet wide through the cemetery for right of and sold the ground occupied by the remains of sixty dead bodies, with- out mentioning the sale to any of the ownerb of the lots. Martin began to remove the bodies Friday, hiring a dozen men to do the work. The news spread, and Saturday the workmen were met by an angry mob of men. women and children and stoned out of tho cemetery. For serernl hours Martin's life seemed in imminent dan- ger. The people refused an increased sum for the lots. Won the Championship. EAT CLAIRE, Wis., Feb. 3. The world's championship skating race be- tween Axel Paulsen. of Minneapolis, and Hugh J. McCormick, of St. Johns, N. B., was decided in this city yesterday in the presence of spectators. The distance was ten miles, or 32 laps. The day was warm and the track an inch deep in water and slash. It was an victory for McCormick. Time. 47JV miattes. Ten thousaifB dollars changed A WUconstn Town Suffers Heavy JLoM from the Fiery Element. KEKOSHA, Wis., Feb. disastrous conflagration risited Konosha yesterday morning, which at one time threatened the town. Fire broke out in the sixth story of Allen Son's taanary and spread with lightning rapidity. The tannery was burned to tho ground. Tha fire communicated to Dr. Pennoyer's Water Cure, which was also destroyed. The patients were taken out of the building in time and no one was injured. Next followed the German church and parsonage. J. Tackey and Christ Broaze, two fire- men, who were carrying leather out of the burning tannery, were scorched by the fire and were obliged to jump from the second-story window, sustaining so- Tere injury. The total loss is estimated ai insurance CANNIBAL AND VAMPIRE. Frightful Story of an Inhuman Surprised in the Midst of His Repast, the Ghoul Escapes. SAX FBAXCIS.CO, Feb. follow- ing instance of unique cannibalism is given by a correspondent in Santiago, Chili: Peo Perez, accompanied by a small boy, Enrique Bello. seven years old, left Valparaiso to travel on foot to Santiago. Upon arrival at tha entrance of the railroad tunnel near San Pedro. Perez seized the boy and un- dertook to eat him alive, lie ate the fingers off one hand and ate part of one foot and bit pieces out of the cheek. then commenced sucking the blood. In the meantime the boy fainted. The guard of the tunnel surprised Perez in the midst of his feast, but could not ar- arrest him, as he fled up the montmn. The boy was taken care of and Perez has been captured. MRS. PARN ELL'S POVERTY. Desperate Condition of the Mother of tbe Irish and Destitute. WASttiNGTOif, Feb. special dis- from Trenton, N. J., says that Mrs. Parnell's home in Bordentown is nothing more than a ruin; that the win- dow sills are shaky and the doors are breaking with their own weight. The wind whistles through every part of the house and the roof lets in both sunshine and rain. The story continues as follows: Mrs. Parnell was found sitting in a laiqfa room, bare of furniture except a few chairs and a table, her feet encased in a pair of old rubbers and wrapped in what had once been a dress. The only heat in the room came in from the sun. Fire there was none, nor even a stove. elve-Tear-Old Boy Sister n Younger Brother. LomaiAXA, Mo., Feb. The most horrible butchery ever chronicled in Eastern Missouri Saturday in the Tillage of Eola, seven miles west of here. A colored family named Bacon, consisting of the father, mother and three children, live in Eola. Early in the the parents left home to be absent all day. The oldest boy, Joseph, aged twelve, was instructed to take care of his brother and sister and not allow them to wander from the premises. About noon Joseph and his sister, aged eight years, quarreled, "and the boy in- stantly took down his father's gun and the sister to death. The murderer then secured an axe and. returning to the house where bis four- year-old brother was shrieking with fright, he deliberately cut off the little fellow's head. The boy dragged the bodies to the door and then walked to the home of his grandmother in this city and told his story. He said they would not behave and he tried to make them obey. The bodies were discovered by the neighbors several hours after the tragedy. The boy is under arrest. POOD FOR FLAMES. LATEST HEWS ITEMS. by From an mf HAVE HAD THEIR DAY. Kllratn Feb. Kilrata and F'-lix fought at the West Theatre yesterday for o! 52.090. is a yo-jnr Frrnca- hao a nambr local was a Va'- police -did aoih'ag Three Insurance Companies In New York to be Wound TTp for lUecal Practices. NEW YORK, Feb. mutual in- surance companies failed Saturday. The three companies in question were comparatively small con- cerns. They are the Guaranty Mutual Accident Association, the Mercantile Accident Association and the Security Mutual Benefit Society. The two for- mer are charged with illegally transfer- ling their assets to the New England Accident Association and tho Massachu- setts Benefit Association. State Insur- ance Examiner Shannon says he will recommend the winding up of the three first named companies and the exclusion from this State of the two eastern com- panies._______________ j Destruction of One dVthe Finest Dullness Blocks In Injured. BOSTON, Feb. morning the Sears building, corner of Court and Washington streets, was found to be burning, and three alarms were at once turned in. The fire had secured a good headway and in a short time the upper stories were a mass of flame and the de- struction of the Rogers elegant marble building to the south, and Young's Hotfl on the west seemed almost certain. The flames, however, were confined to the Sears building. At elevem o'clock the fire was com- pletely under control, with nothing left of the building but bare walls. Two firemen were bedly injured by pieces of the falling roof. The Sears building was a five-story marble structure, owned by J. Mont- gomery Sears, and was one of the finest business blocks in Boston. It is thought the fire originated in the engine room and spread across the passageway and up the elevator well. The building was valued at and was insured for It was occupied by banking and other concerns and yielded a yearly rental of DEATH UNDERGROUND. Explosion In a Mine Kills Two Men, Fa. tally Inj ures Two and Seriously Wonnils Many Others. WILKXSBAKRE, Pa., Feb. cave-in occurred in the Nottingham shaft of the' Lohigh Wilkcsbarre Coal Company in No. 5 plane Saturday afternoon, which drove the accumulated gas in to the gang- ways where ten men were at work with naked lamps and an explosion soon fol- lowed, which resulted in the death of two men, fatal injury to two more and serious injuries to the remainder of the miners. William Roberts, a driver boy, is missing. The dead are: John Crossin, buried beneath the falling rock: Jotm B Humphries, a miner, who died white being removed from the mine. His body was burned to a crisp. The miners injured are: Peter Heim, cut upon the head and badly burned; Joseph Dunson, burned about face and bands. His injuries are said to be fatal; Joseph Jones, fatally burned; John Thomas, burned on the face and bands, seriously; David Fox, seriously burned; Chomas Lake, cut on the head. Attempted Suicide of a Youns; Girl. NEW YORK, Feb. Beer, aged fifteen, attempted suicide in a dime museum at 531 Eighth avenue Saturday night by taking Paris green. Her father, a carpenter, had been out of work for some time on account of a broken leg. He told Mary a few days ago that she ought to get work and help pay the rent, The girl went out and came back at night, saying she had obtained work. She went out every day, but in fact had not been able to secure employment and Saturday night, being afraid or ashamed to return home without any money, 
                            

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