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Salem Daily News: Tuesday, January 21, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - January 21, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SALEM DAILY NEWS. NO- 17. SALEM. OHIO, TUESDAY. JANUARY 21. 1890. TWO CENTS. ibown Up In 1m Well Claimed otoriooa Liar. A SNOW BLOCKADE. Trawl WMtvrn Bccnvas of Forgery Mayor Moebj, ced on tbe stand to investigate the y yesterday. He r Wood, who first g- uste, last, with a i from E. C. Hall, if e The ber of letters from lorsing Wood for Lip. Among these overnor Foraker. Wood's appoint- announced in Cin- tnaa called on the rood of being a no- tiat his record was was George W. icr-in-law. Inves- witness had Jew- roborated. Wood e mayor informed Wood denied them the charges and ter of letters from aen giving Wood a had never occurred t-box paper was a at Governor" For- 0 make use of it. 1 with Wood about told him what he raker that he had Well man, the pri- tohn R. McLean. n that the 5ry, Wood came to him about an in- Star in which the r. Elliot as saying that his (Wood's) were liars and he The mayor pressed the I forged paper. >w which paper he mayor explaining le in the Commer- id there were three e one Halstcad had yor said the pub- t contain all the but Wood insisted cplained that there ihree cliques work- ugh Congress, and iave certain papers these cliques by ere interested in a them o3. called to the questions from Mr. tad lived in Cincin- lad not taken an cs. Governor For- id first suggested le smoke inspector- pressed witness to le names referred Soveraor Foraker. he had said Satur- ible names were ription paper and to have them pho- ditiou. is were intended to perjuring himself, oles inthesubscrip- Georgia, wanted to s of Senators Sher- ckbridgo and others to the ballot-box d that he did it to publishing to make it purely 1 not pass the paper raker to hurt any- id asked him about he would have told 10 Gareraor wanted aad to ceatlcwn whose pajwT had no he knew, with the of Cincinnati, had CHICAGO, Jan. snow block- ade in the West and Northwest -is one of tbe most complete on record. Not .only has travel become an impossibility on the western divisions of the Central and Northern Pacific, but every through telegraph wire is down on both routes. Washington and Oregon have but one wire connecting them with the outside to San Frtncisco via Port- is unable to carry much business. There are men at work on the Central Pacific road trying to clear the blockade at Emigrant Gap in the Sierras, but as the snow plows can network through the freezing ice, the prospect of the road being opened soon is poor. The snow is seven feet deep and fathomless in the cuts. On the Northern Pacific, Colonel Crocker's special train has beea snowed in for three days. The SouthernPac.8c has been badly injured by washouts in the Teachepi Mountains and beyond Los Angeles the floods have done great damage. It has been raining in South- ern California. for several days past, while it is snowing in, the north. SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. snow blockade on the Central Pacific railroad in the vicinity of Truekee and Emigrant Gap has become very serious. Since Tuesday last no eastern overland trains have been able to reach a point further west than Colfax. All of the eastbound trains are at Coliax and Shady Eun, while those coming west are at Emigrant Gap, Truckee and Reno. At Truckee the depth of the snow va- ries from eight to twenty feet. Snow plows pushed by ter and twelve locomo- tives are reported stuck fast in the drifts. Snow is still faUinsr and places on the road which had been cleared by the plowshare rapidly filling up again. The passengers of the blockaded trains are comfortably quartcied at hotels by the company. Some cases of influenza are reported among the passengers and the company has providf dthe sufferers with medical attention. The railroad officials declare that the blockade is the heaviest and longest they have experienced for over ten years. No mails have reached this city from the east since last Tues- day. Telegraphic wires are entirely buried by the snow in some places. Proceedings In the Senate and House of Representatives. WASHINGTON. Jan. after routine business the introduction of bills and favornble reports from committees on bills the admission of "Wyoming and for a tsmporary form of government for Okla- homa, Mr. Pasco addressed the Senate on the subject of Federal control of elections. 'Uecoii struction measures and the work ot army offi- cers, Freedman's Bureau agents, camp follow- ers and stragglers he said, -vere efforts of the Republican party to build up a Southern "an- neV to their and thus prolong their lease of power. It h-xd turned out to be a rope of sand, and now the attempt was to be made to seize the electoral machinery of the States Mr. Chandler followed Mr. Pasco. That Sen- ator, he said, had complained or the character of some citizens of the South who had come north us witnesses concerning political out- rages in that section: and hart also .had somo- thiug to say about the silent voter. There was one citiyen of Florida, said Mr Chandler, who will not come north to testify concerning politi- cal outrages. That man was John Burr, a col- ored citizen of Madison County Florida. Woo, In October last, having been to Jacksonville as a wit-ess concerning political outrages, was -killed on his return to Madison County bv the Democrats of that county, on account of the te--'imony which he hafl pven. >Ir. said that it had been his purpose to address the Sanate to day on the sjenerai sub- ject discussed by the Senators from Alabama. South Carolina and Florida, but he was suffer- intj from the consequences of the prevailing malady to such an extent tnat he should be un able to do so. He irave notice, however, that on Thursdav he move the consideration of Mr Butler's bill, for the purpose of making some observations thereon. Tbe Senate pro- ceeded to the consideration of executive busi- ness and then adjourned. Sp-aker announced the anpo-.r.t ment of the World's Fair Committee as of Massachusetts: Hitt. of Illi- nois: Bowdoin. of Virginia: Belden. of New York Frank, of Missouri: Sprinzer. of Illinois; Hatch, of Missouri: Wilson, of West and Flower, of Sew Mr. O.iies. of Ala- bama, anil S'.onc. of Kentucky, offered resolu- tions to for their by the SilroU eznbezd'-ta-ai. Itoth resolutions were ref-ared to the SlJcott commltt-cc. Mr Spriascr offered providiae that tbe next of of the Fair. iho Ifm dwidrd. the special 3i5il-c to 7-port the fair at Ujr to the sp-cial commit- Speaker Reed's Selection of UM World's Fair Committee Meets With Approval From the Bep- reaentotntes of the Compet- ing Cities. The Question of Location Will bo ered After the Amount to be Appropri- ated HIM Determined. WASHINGTON, Jan. Commit- tee on World's Fair appointed by the Speaker yesterday will get to work as soon as possible. The interests of the four cities competing for the location of the fair are supposed to be thoroughly represented on the committee. The representatives of each city were asked to name two members of the committee, and the Speaker named the chairman. The West did not want the appointment of Mr. Candler, who is supposed to be in favor of an eastern location for the fair, but there is no serious objection to the appointment now that it has been made. A proposition will be laid before the committee at its first meeting that a scheme for the organization of the fair be agreed upon and the time for holding the fair be fixed befoie the question of locating the site is taken up. The fear is expressed that if the site for the fair is chosen before the appro- priation or loan has been agreed upon the Mends of the disappointed cities will put obstacles in the way of the pas- sage of the bill establishing the fair. It is altogether likely, therefore, that the question of location will be taken up last It is a common belief, growing every day, that the fair will not be held in 1893, and a great many people are in- clined to favor 1895 as a desirable date. of th" Town IriSi. Af.-r ktnc MO? procrcs< with the Mil VSrs toimait- tee Mid told Wont in thcria of 21- characlrr at has of 5n in r will and aaar wailar to tbir famd F. FORGERY AND BLACKMAIL. Arrest Of a Sjracuse, N. T., Man on Charges Which, if Proven, Will Him to the Pen. SYRACUSE, N. T., Jan. B Ralston, formerly employed by the Singer Sewing Machine Company in this city, has been arrested here by an Og densburg sheriff. A Prescott, Ont.. offi- cer also in search of Kalston is here. The Canadian officer says he has been seeking Ralston for three years on a charge of forgery. It is said that among the serious charges against Ralston is one that he used his wife as a means of blackmail- ing people It will be remembered that Mrs. Ralston was found in company with McXetton, a book agent for Ivison, Blakeman Co., of New York, at Lans- ing, Mich., on. December 20 last. Rals- ton went to Lansing, where he obtained, a warrant, but the matter was settled in some w ay. It is now stated that Me Netton was the victim of a blackmailing scheme by the Ralstons. Tlie Ettra Charge Is Legal. PmL.VDEi.rrnA, Jan. 21. The Su- preme Court yesterday decided in favor Df the Pennsylvania Railroad Company in the appeal of the suit of Reese, of Pittsburgh, the question at issue being the legality of the extra charge of ten Dents where fare is paid on trains in- stead of at ticket offices. The court holds that where ample, facilities are given to procure tickets and a coupon is for the refund of tho extra charge, the practice is justifiable. Cause of Klf Conflagration. BOSTON, Jan. Marshal combe in his report on the Thanksgiv- ing Day fire, admits the impossibility of deciding beyond a doubt the origin of tbe fire, but says: "f must still yield to the conclusion that the fire was in some way caused by the ignition of the relay in the office of the Electric Time Com- pany, probably owing to contact with a high tension wire." The marshal urges tho need of municipal control of wires and better building Iras. flat FlnlOien Laeketl Ont. n.vyr.rnT. Conn.. Jan. the hat finishers in fourteen of the sixteen shops here, numbering 1.200 men. will be locked out to-day by order of tbe ITmt Manufacturers" Association. The diffi- culty is of nine standing and jrows out of employment of three 5n She department of C. shop. There is a dispute as to whether bojs are 
                            

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