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Salem Daily News: Monday, January 20, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - January 20, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               HE SALEM DAILY NEWS. NO. 16. SALEM. OHIO, MONDAY. JANUARY 20. TWO CENTS. BaUot-Box i CHABGCS OF FRAUD oe Sew Tells Some Jtoriea. re wae Amy Crtaslaal a the a. ballot- 1 attended Saturday. continued his r 6, after the publi- mile of the ballot- ailed on him and go to Washington, uiries about the gun Witness sent him i received a telegram advising him that gery and that Hal- a retraction in his This telegram was" Foraker might not the matter in his slegram the Govern- Ir. Halstead that it tter had been im- of the forgery For- 1 should be looked nake statements or of the wrong people. McGrew, of Wash- authorized him to I. He told McGrew 3 communicate with unpublished letter that he knew that 1 agreed to subscribe stock was produced d by Foraker from In this letter Wood sorry the Governor ad seenjn the papers >x matter had some- and offered to give a the witness of all led in the letter that so-called forgery and 5overnor to think he er here finished his 1 he knew that Wood ion and he wanted to this. There was not ience held back in there was not a thing rid might know. For- what heated during spoke of Wood, who ten feet from him, ouadr el. was then called. He chanical expert and Ho had known For- years and also knew 1. He identified the aid he had first seen on. He got the paper ice. The names were ati by Mr. Milward. sd Davis helped. This ice of Mr. Murray, so- )od Hall Ballot-box imes were written at Wood said he told Ke wanted to trade the is called the ''George ;h might injure the He intended the s fac-siiuilies of the l ST. committee supreme of the Royal Ar- eaaum, who have been investigating sensational against members and officers during the past week, con- cluded their work Saturday and de- parted. The accused are U. W. Chand- ler, one of the most promjpent mer- chants on the floor of the exchange, Past Grand Regent of the State, and now a member of the Grand Council; J. F. Coyle, of the firm of Coyle Sargent, St. Louis, Grand Treasurer of the State, and Dr.'A. B. Shaw, Grand Medical Ex- aminer of the State. The charges are conduct unbecoming members of the order, defrauding fel- low members and falsifying books and accounts. These charges grow out of a mining transaction by which the ac- cused placed a property known as the Fannie mine among members of the order. It is charged that they made false representations, by which they se- cured from members of the order enough money for a small share of the mine to pay for all of it, leaving them owners of the comtfolling interest, for which they were out no money., The mine subsequently proved worthless. Volum- inous testimony has been taken and will be laid before the Supreme Council at Boston. ESC APED Cloee Call (or a Number of Families In South Chicago T. nements. CHICAGO, Jan. families living in the upper stories of two build- Ings on Ninety-second street, in South Chicago, had a narrow escape from death by fire Saturday rooming. They got out safely as it was, though most of their goods were burned up. One of the structures was a brick three-story build- Ing, recently erected, occupied as a butcher shop and on the upper floor by families. The fire started in the sausage rooms in the basement and spread rapidly through the building. The flames spread to Barr's hardware store in a frame building next door and totally destroyed it. A number of barns in the neighborhood were also licked up by the conflagration, though no live-stock perished. The total loss will be about The insurance was very light. Bemitter Union on the Fron Cot- Two Steamboats CMM Together Witt Crash and tfce Katie Is Lost. Pow of the Craw the Ill-rated Boat aad They Were Undoubtedly Dro aad Canto a Total tax. VICKSBCBO, Miss., Jan. 30. The steamboat Katie Robbing, bound for the Tazoo river, was sunk Saturday night near Haynes Bluff, thirty-five miles above Vicksburg, by collision with a barge in tow of the steamboat Josie Harkins, from Sunflower river for Viok- burg. Four of the Katie Bobbins' deck crew are missing and are undoubtedly drowned. The passengers, including three ladies, were aroused from sleep when the collision occurred and were rescued without difficulty, but lost their baggage. The ofBQers and crew saved their clothing only. The boat's books and papers were lost. Clerk Phipps saved the money, but had a narrow es- cape himself, being awakened and dragged out by the night watchman. The vessel and cargo will probably be a total loss. The Josie Harkins was uninjured, but her barge was capsized and sacks of seed and thirty bales of cotton were dumped into the river. The collision resulted from a misunderstanding ol signals. The Katie Bobbins was the best boat of the Tazoo Tallahatchie Transportation Company's line. She was valued at paper referred to in a rnor as having valua- is simply a blank sub- fa the names John R. Hall Wood Ballot- t. >d met Governor For- of the Commercial-Ga- rnor to rip open those fel- Ile referred to those i signed to tbe forged insisted that he did up for such a pnrposo ovemor not to let Hal- 10 Governor said that not pven to TIaistcad ae latter would attack but still Wood i paper must not be ication. the- testimony, chair- the witness a qnes- l the room to become Did any other person ad tlie Tounjr mea who any knowledge that put i this subscription list Ijce. He aVicod what aad then came the SENTENCED AT LAST. Pittsburgh Alderman His Constables Sent to Prison for Conspiracy. PITTSBTJKOH, Jan. motion for a new trial in the cases of Alderman Porter andjiis coustables, argued before "Judges Stagle and Collier, was overruled Saturday. The defendents were then sentenced as follows: AJferuian Porter, one year and nine months in the peni- tentiary and 8500 fine; Constable Carney, three months in the workhouse; Consta- ble Packer, thirty days in jail. The crime of which defendants were found guilty was conspiracy. The con- stables woiked up cases against illegal liquor sellers and keepers of bawdy houses; made the informations before Alderman Porter, who quietly settled the cases for a money consideration, dis- charged the accused and divided the money received with his constables. Heath of Hon. Long-worth. CrscixxATi, Jan. Jsicholas T ongworth died Saturday of pneumonia. Ho attended the inauguration of Gov- ernor Campbell on Monday last at Co- lumbus, serving as a member of Gov- ernor Foraker's staff. While there he became ill and the illness developed into pneumonia. Mr. Longworth was a son of the late Joseph Longworth, of this city, a member of one of the oldest and wealthiest families of Cincinnati. He was a lawyer _by profession. He served for a time as'one of the judges of POISON INJTHE COFFEE. Oxalic Acid Drank by a Shoemaker, His Daughter and a Little Girl. BTOFAXO, N. Y., Jan. Feirely, a German shoemaker, seventy four years old, living with his daughter. Mrs. Myers, a widow, and her ten-year old daughter, at 47 Cypress street, be- came despondent yesterday and proposec to his daughter that they end thei: troubles bypoisoningthemselves. Feire ly, having some oxalic acid in the house drugged the coffee and all drank it, the child being the only one ignorant of what she was doing. Feirely is a slave to liquor and has a terrible temper. His chances for recovery are small. The woman's case is apparently the most se-_ rious. It is thought the little girl will recover. A OIOAHT.C 8W1NPU. ay a FRUGALITY IN RUINS. Business Portion of a Peiunylranla Town Fire. ALTOOXA, Pa., Jan. The business portion of the village of Frugality, fif- teen miles north of this city, was de- stroyed by fire early Sunday morning, including.a'hotel, the Adams express office and a store. Mr. and Mrs. Walls, sleeping in the hotel, had narrow es- capes from being burned to death. Their bed was afi.ro when two miners, coming from work, discovered and rescued the couple with great difficulty. The hotel and store were owned by the Frugality Coal and Coke Company. The loss is estimated at between S50.000 and partially covered by insur- ance. en- Siotrr PAXUS, IX, Jan. Aaditor Taylor's attention has to anotbar swindle, the; magnitude of which Is hardly second to thOfe recently exposed by the State Aa- r. wherein Dexter Tamer appeared the leading character. Henry Froe- lleh, who figured prominently in a wild octllfe insurance company at Huron a tew years ago, has been soliciting among farmers of Beadle, Sanborn, Miner, Moody, Minnehaha and other cennties during the past year in the in- terest of a concern called the Stock Owners' Mutual Union. Froelich par- ported to be the general agent, with headquarters at Huron. The concern seems to have existed only in name, and Froelich's scheme in connection with it was to insure live-stock on the mutual plan at a nominal premium. His prop- osition was extremely liberal and hia scheme appeared so plausible that he siaooeeded in taking in the farmers by thtfdozens. Things went well with the S. O. M. U. until the losses began to come in. It was then that continued silence on the part of Froelich led to an investigation, which developed the fact that he was the head and tail to the Stock Owners' Mtttual and the insurance he writ- ten and distributed among the is not worth the paper it is written on. Froelich has suddenly turned up miss- ing and it is believed he has left for more comfortable quarters. From re- ports already received it is safe to esti- mate that his fraudulent business will amount to several hundred thousand dollars. f___________ OBITUARY. Orlow W. Chapman, Solicitor General ol Department of Jiutlco. WA.SHJNGTOJT, Jan. 20. Orlow W. Chapman, Solicitor General of the De- partment of Justice, died here Sunday of catarrhs! affection of the kidneys, in his sixty-sixth year. Mr. Chapman was attacked with the grippe two weeks ago, and this, although not severe, aggra- vated an old affection of the kidneys and led to his death. His condition was not regarded by his physicians' as seri- ous until last Friday evening. He failed rapidly from that time and died Sunday morning at eight o'clock. Brief funeral services will be held here this afternoon and his remains wil be taken to his home in Binghamton, N Y., where his funeral and burial wili take place on Wednesday. 1 POWDEBL.T ARRESTED. told Wooi that the Supreme Court of Ohio Preacher Chared With BUFFALO. X. Y.. Jan. E. C. Ernest, of St. Jacob's church, is accused of misapplying 54.700 which be collected to defray the expenses of organizing a erand musical festhal to aid the build- in? of the church, A is published several leading citwens who were aiding in the movement announce their withdrawal. Mr. Ernest is much troubled over the affair. He denies his ruilt. but does not explain what has been done with funds. Tvtvd PxTyxwtrrAwyET. Pa.. Jan. negroes were broach- Friday and U> work loadsnz coke at Refused tc Accept Reduced HAJRTFOKD. Conn., Jan. The gineers and firemen of the express trains between Hartford and Campbell Hall, on the Central New England 
                            

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