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Salem Daily News: Tuesday, January 14, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - January 14, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. OL. II. NO. 11. SALEM. OHIO, TUESDAY, JANUARY U. CONGUJESSIONAL. A GOOD BEGINNING. persons Killed and Fifty- Three Wounded the Passage of Tornado r Clinton. Ky.-Fifly-flve Houses Demolished. of the TerrlBo Storm St. LouU and Other i and Ill, Jan. 14.-A tornado Sunday uck the east side of the city of Kv., demolishing nftj-flre eleven people and wound- jhre'e. The killed, so far as ed, are: bodes and two children. Bono. t Bone. Nance. Gaddie and infant. of J. C Hodges. rson not identified. undedare: Judge E.G. Hodges, ind R. Gwynn, child and father; C. W. Voor- child and two relations, names Rev. N. W. Little, his wife 'children, D. Stubblefleld and .omhers of his family, not seri- ,rt, Mrs Foster and two chil- s. j. Rhodes and one child-r- mil die; A L. Emerson and ken, W. F. Boone; Mrs. John e and one child; Mr. Jackson; jhnson, Sr dangerously hurt; lonnson. Jr., will die; W. R. is wife and child, and several ]oso names can not be learned no. Assistance was sent from 10 storm also visited Wickliffe, considerable damage to but no loss of life. 111., Jan cyclone iown in this vicinity in a sav- A furious gale of wind, ac- d by rain, came from the same taken by the tornado which iis section a few years ago. n Sunday evening wrecked two in Brooklyn, turning one hileit was filled with colored rs Several were slightly in- hc houses on the Irwin Smith los Harvard farms were de- A house belonging to a man orlack, near Venice, was blown a woman was seriously in- poles and wires are nn in numerous places on the ind other railroads between id East St. Louis The dam- imatcd at S500.000. la., JJ.D. heavy m, the first of the season, pre- orc yostenlay Fully twelve snow have fallen. The wind ig a gale and it is drifting GTON, la Jan. ueavy most of Saturday night and I Sunday evening. Then the colder and the walks were red with sleet. A heavy north- d is blowing, with every char- of a blizzard, tbe rain baring 10 sleet, and snow. i, Kan Jan. terrific us been raging hore sinr.c be- r'.ilv Sunday, accompanied by hail, with fine drifting snow, continues A blockade of all directions is threatened. K. Kan -Ian. than a UK has fallen, and the blizzard Tt is considered the '-m in years and will cause of stock. The cuts on the rail- S'.Knj and the trains are dc II'., .Tnn terrific wind i-ion. lowing down fences and The storm was more here and St. Louis. in tbe Kaskas- r.v doubt l.c raised several fr.e. Jnci Jan. lower HI.? of Ind.. Tb'- watrr- Ther [ontana First Year State Without a Dollar of ludebtedueM and Mouer la the Treasury. HELENA, Mont.. Jan. >egins the year without a dollar of in- debtedness and with a cash balance in ;he treasury. State Auditor Ken nay las completed his report to the Gov- ernor for the last year, and placed it in the hands of the printer. The total as- sessment of the State is an increase of nearly over the previous year. During the year the warrants drawn on the general fund amounted to 8226.806, and January 1, with no warrants outstanding, the cash balance in that fund was The most prominent items of expense tor the year are: Support of insane, support cf convicts, maintenance of militia, bounty on animals, support of deaf mute, blind and imbecile persons, Other expenditures were for salaries, the different stock funds, etc. The limit of the tax levy is three mills. Hitherto but one mill has been levied. This year two and possibly three mills will be levied to meet tho expenses of Statehood. Tho estimated expenses of the State government for this year are while with taxes and licenses tbe State can raise a reve- nue of over without additional legislation. The outlook for the first year of Statehood is flattering. DISASTROUS WRECK. Four Sections of a Freight Train Collide, Demolishing ;ir< a ail DEXXISOX, O.. bad freight wreck occurred Sunday on the Pan- Handle road at Union Point, thirty miles east of Dsnnison. delaying pas- senger trains fivo to six hours. first section of a freight tram broke in ttvo. The rear end ran into the front part of the train, wrecking a number of cars. The second section ran into the first, the third into tbe second and a fourth into the third, piling up the cars indiscriminately. Twenty-five cars were piled on top of one of the engines. The wreck took fire and burned up the cars and one engine Fortunately the train- men all jumped and escaped with slight injuries.________________ Lengthy Reports Submitted Con- cerning the Matter. Tbe Government Will Make Good the Loss of Members' Salaries Dc.ith K.ite Tncre.tslng. CmCAGO. Jan. corrected mortuary figures for the past seven days show that there were 4S7 deaths in the city, an increase of about thirty per cent, over the death rate for the sama time last year. Of this number 203 of the victims died from pneumonia, bron- chitis and other respiratory diseases and from consumption. There wore fifty- five deaths from the latter disease, many of them beroT accelerated byinfltiefiwi and the prevailing weather. There were fifty deaths from bronchitis and eighty- seven from pneumonia. It is safe to esti- mate that ten per cent, of these deaths .were directly or indirectly due to the grippe. ________________ the Kijjlit-Hon XKW YORK. -Tan. Most was asked yesterday position the Anarchists would take on theeight-honr work day. "It's a fake from the start to the end." he said, "I have published it so in my paperin nearly every edition. Oh. what nonsense, to think that any good can conu- to the workintrmen out of things gotten urt by Senators, politi- cians and such persons. Bo you think that even if they should get eight hours they would keep it? No. sir: the Anar- chists will not take any part in such Shot and Killed lir a Gstmhler. SPOKANE Wash.. Jan. the sporting fra- was shot and killed Sunday by Harrr T'.aer. one of the proprietors of the largest gambling house in 'he Northwest. IJaer was in the art of ejecting a tnan from his for stealing when be bv "Kiff AflT iJ? the assault long Kaer crew a rrvolTor ant! The Should the Views of a Majority of the la. vestlgatloK Committee be Minority Oppose Method of Settle- Blent. WASHINGTON, Jan. select committee to investigate the accounts of the office of the sergeant-at-arms of the House, commonly known as the Silcott committee, yesterday submitted to the House three reports and two bills bearing1 on the disposition of the diffi- culties that bave arisen concerning the responsibility for the loss of members' salaries caused by Silcott's defalcation. Mr. Adams, the chairman of the com- mittee, submitted the majority report, and Messrs. Hemphill and Holman sub- mitted minority reports. Mr. Adams' report says: "The ques- tion is whether, according to the rules of plain, substantial justice, it ought te be assumed that when the money was passed to Silcott by tbe treasury teller it was received by the members them- selves. Up to that instant the Govern- ment owed a certain sura for Congres- sional salaries. Did the Government at that instant, and by the act of the treas- ury teller in paying and the act of Sil- it in receiving the money, discharge the obligation? We believe that mem- bers of Congress did not then and there receive the money due them. The Gov- ernment did not then and there dis- charge its obligation to tho delegates members of the Fifty-first Con- gress, or to any one of them." The report concludes as follows: Your committee believe that delegates and members of Congress are entitled to receive tbe amount of the salaries al- lowed them by law for the period end- ing December 4, 1889, and not yet re- ceived by them, notwithstanding the fact that on tho 27th and 30th of last November large sums of money intended for tho payment of said salaries were by the cashier of tho treasury placed in the hands of C. E. Silcott, cashier of tbe late sergeant-at-arms. in his official capacity and in the regular course of his official business, and were by said Silcott illegally appropriated to bis per Sonal use." Mr. Holman in his minority report states that he is unable to concur in tho opinion expressed by the majority of tho committee that the sergeant-at-arms is a disbursing officer of the United States. that declares him to bo a disbursing offi- cer, or that Dlaces around the funds that might comeinto his hands tho safe- guards provided by lawto protect public funds in tbe bands of a disbursing offi- cer of tbe United States. Mr. Holman then discussestha various legal aspects of tho case and comes to the conclusion that the 13 simply an officer of the House of Rep- resentatives, charged with the disburse- ment of certain funds. He holds that the bonds of sergeant-at-arms Lecdo-n and Silcott expired with the Fiftieth Congress on March 4, 1S39, that the House was without a bonded disbursing officer when tho defalcation occurred. Mr. TTolman's report is voluminous and discusses every phase of the at length. Mr. FIcmphilL in his report, boids that the matter is not one thai can settled by Congress, on account of iu it be referred to the Court of for settlement. Jan. KsrHi <3rr aad Sc wind aniSwrst urill TOO HAXHV WITH HIS PEK. of I-mr I.T flann X. Y.. Jan. 14. Snyder at respected citizen of Sfaokan. near be.rc. has confessed to forcing several thou- sand was in tbe sale pianos and for a Chi- cago manufacturer. on Ibo in- t j-lan. for A A d. Va.: was 511 arst! vnl. for strjv-rrisor Jh-lanrev Math'-ws. a Iradinc merchant w'-a-n. and that be had ansouat IIT IttTfliTic ail ffjii In the Senate Mid of Kepraeeatatlves-BUI Introduced ffcr Movmanent to Samuel J. Ttlden. W-AMIKGION, Jan. the Ben- ateyerterday Mr. Turpte fave notice that would on Wednesday address tbe Senate on tbe MorfM resolution for tbe recognition of the repubUe of Brazil. A number of petitions were presented and referred, among them one signed by of Chief Justice Fuller and Jus- tices Field and Uarlan and by the wires of a number of distinguished officials and citizens of Washfaffton praying for tbe appointment women ou the board of managers of the Expo- A Mat resolution was passed authorizing the Marshal of the Suprf me Court to loan the por- the Chief Justices to the New York State Bar Association for exhibition at the ju- centenary to be held on February 4, 1880. Mr. Butler gave notice that he would address Senate next Thursday on the subject of his bill tot the emigration of colored people, and Mr Pasco gave like notice for the same .rits to be on tbe subject of Federal elections. ,w.ect committee on Pacific railroads was increased to Dine members, and Senators Platt and Turpic were added to it. A resolution was agreed to directing the Secretary of the Treas- ury to send to the Senate a copy of the report of W. P Hepburn, Commissioner of the Treas- ury, concerning the methods of administering, at the port of New York, the_ laws regulating immigration. The resolution from the House announcing tbe Aeath of Representative W. D. Kelley was called up and as an additional mark of respect to the memory of the deceased the Senate ad- Adams, chairman of the investigating committee, submitted a report, accompanied by a b'Jl appropriating to cover the deficiency "auscd by Silcott's defalca- tion. Minority reports wure submitted by Messrs. Hemphiil and Holman. All were or- printed and recommitted. On the call of St a number of bills were introduced and referred. A concurrent resolution for the priuttnsr of copies of the address of Chief Justice Fuller on the occasion of the commemoration of the inauguration of George u'usumgiou as agreed to. Mr. Cummings. of New York, introduced a Joint resolution for the erection of a bionze Statue to the memory of Samuel J. Tilden. to be placed In the rotunda of the Capitol That on a tablet on the front base of said statue there shall be conspicuously engraved these words. "Samuel J. Tilden, nineteenth President of the United but not seated." That on tne right of the square base shall be en- graven the date of birSi, election and death of such President, and on that on the opposite side shall be ensjr.wen an eagle with a snake in his talons and under them these words: "For tbe right." At the close of the call of States the House wen tin to Committee of the Whole for the con Sideration of the bill to provide for town sites and entry of lands in Oklahoma. 'After discussing the measure for a few min- oies the committee rose and the House then ad- ________________ MILLION FOB CHARITY. Knormoua Sums Bequeathed by a Pltti- Iron Manufacturer for the Erec- of a Hospital and Church Work. NEW YORK, Jan. will of the late John S. H. Shoenberger, the mil- lionaire iron manufacturer of Pitts- burgh, who resided during recent years in this city, was filed in the surrogate's office yesterday. Re gives about one- half of his estate to his relatives. His executors arc authorized to convey cer- tain real estate in the Seventh wa'rd of of Pittsburgh erection and maintenance thereon of buildings for a froe Protestant church hospital, as a memorial to testator's deceased first wife, which shall be known as the "St. Margaret Memorial Hospital.'' For the Dompletion of this benefaction the will further directs the expenditure of S550-- 000. The sum of SI is given to Trinity ;hurch. of Pittsburgh, on condition of establishing free daily services, or al- ternatively, to the endowment of the hospital. The Church Rome Associa- tion, of Allegheny. Pa., receives S35.000; the Bishop Seabury Mission, of Minne- sota. the Hoard of Missions of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the iiocese of Pittsburgh. SIQ.OOO: the Mis sionary Society of the same church, lo- r-ated in New York. ?T'0.003. The re- mainder of the estate is to be held by the executors in trust, and as soon as practicable the further sum of SiVO.OOO is to DC added to the endowment of tho St, Margaret Hospital. FOOD FOR FLAMES. An Klcntor. SOO.OOO of C.rmlm and an Iron ttarnrd at Ital- Lout. No. 8 on north of the Patap.oco river, belonginjr to the Elevator Company and by the Northern Cen- tral Hail road Company. liurscd last night, with xll its Tbo total is J700.OOO and JWO.OWO. The Kritisb which was Irjac also lotally of Ibe strainer's vaid have vet learned, irrrr cither Governor Campbell Takes tho Oath of Office iTf a" "l al lavl U fyil to Turn- England. l jiVm! A alarw 14 -Ti tbe Presence of an Euormous Concourse of People From All Over the State. A Fine Military and Civic Parade, Com- of of Militia and Mem- of 1'olltical COLUMBUS, O., Jan. elect James E. Campbell took the oath of office Monday at noon. His message to the General Assembly is compara- tively brief and touches upon a number of subjects of State and local interest. Special trains on nearly all the roads brought in militia and club organiza- tions yesterday from all garts of the State and the city was crowded with en- thusiastic Democracy. The inaugura- tion of Governor Campbell probably commanded a larger attendance than the inauguration of any Governor since Allen. The day was cold and crisp but the weather did not interfere with tho movements of the people. The inaugu- ral ceremonies took place at the east front of the Capitol. The masses could not be accommodated indoors. Govern- or Foraker, who was sick Sunday night from an attack of la grippe, was present to introduce the new Governor, but he made no speech. The address of Gov- ernor Campbell was frequently ap- plauded. The parade was one of the finest which has been seen on tho streets of the city for many days. There were over militia in line and nearly members of club organizations. All the cities of the State were represented, as well as Pittsburgh, Wheeling, Chicago, Indian- apolis andotherpointsoutside the State. Governor Campbell and family, assisted by the members of his staff, gave a re- ception in the Senate chamber last even- ing to the general public. Mr. Lampson was sworn in as Lieu- tenant Governor in the Senate chamber by Judge Spehr. ex-Lieutenant Governor Lyon introduced Lampson all the Republicans and but one Democrat applauded Mr. Lampson made a few remarks, but did not allude to the con- test for the Lieutenant Governorship. The other State officers were sworn in quietly in their offices. ALMOST BLOWN OVEtt. Position of an Electric Mast Wliirh Lost ltd Supporting CtEVEL.vxn. Jan. high wind of Sunday night tore three guy wires loose from tbe electric light mast in tho Public Square, winch is 250 feet high, and came very near blowing the mast over. The eastern and western support- ing wires were broken and ail that hold the m.ist in its place -A ere the northern and the sotithern wires. The mast swayed in the breeze in an alarming fashion and the heavy lamps at the top made the danger of toppling over much more imminent At one time the north- ern guy wire would be taut and tho southern wire slack and then this order of things would bs reversed. Had either one of tbos-j wires broken the mast would probably have crashed to tho earth. FO-STKlt HONORED. TWO CENTS. WILD WINDS IN THE EAST. Tlif by Ohio forl'nltol Senxtnr. O.. Jan. The Repub- lican caucus to nominate a candidate for United Suites Senator was held last night and outof seventy-one Republican fifty-nine attended. Senator Massie. of thcChiliicothc district, nomi- nated ex-Governor Charles Foster, and Keprc.sentat.ivc e pot at and thrown overboard, tlio ;roiiv took Ibo boats wben 090 miles !rom Capo Town. The boats lay by from 'our p. in. until one o'clock tbo next nornanp. when the STXJ rvaclu'd tho lynamiU' and a Urrrific oc- sarrxsd. tbe base iron u> Th" of the fjcpiosion r.os seen iy CaaVta's officers I'M air.t. and tbou-bt to a falhng IJIJK- Imt beranne and A" 
                            

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