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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: January 9, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - January 9, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. OL. IL NO. 7. SALEM. OHIO, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9. 1890. TWO CENTS. of St. Louis Presented in Strong Terms AS AS Vork Cttj, elevation of Prominent Citi- 13 From the Mound City. the Which the MU- a Site for tosition of 1892. VGTO.X, Jan. quadri- al committee of the Senate, of r Hiscock is chairman, began ogs yesterday. The St. Louis ;tt was given the first hearing. irman stated that there was no speeches but that it was gen- cpeeted that no city would re- >re than an hour and a half, and replies would be filed with the ce in writing. nor Francis first addressed the ee. He spoke of the unanimity imcnt throughout the United i favor of holding an Interna- xposition commemorative of tho y of America. He said that St. natte no sectional plea. He that this question should be bove the plane of sectionalism. 's II. Jones, chairman of the St. xecutivo committee, explained tb the advantages of location d by St. Louis. He had nothing i disparagement of any city. One :ities in competition based its ty to the seaboard. It would 10 difference to the foreign ex- m what _part of America the Fair should be held. He said We other cities were hunting lable sites, St. Louis offered six at Louis had put in the first i tho World's Fair and was the i suggested. Staniard said he bad a laudable n the progress and development lisMssippi valley within the last. iturj. Withm the 500 miles ra- St Louis were the capitals of i commonwealths. They would I to St. Louis if St. Louis should le the site of the World's Fair, 5t Louis would be loyal to her- 1 tbe nation if any other city be selected. He dwelt at length .entral location of St. Louis. No said, would think of holding a Fair in the. extreme west, or rerne south or the extreme north. ople of the West had built up the d with the business they had Ccw York. Philadelphia and Bos- le thoug-ht the holding of the fair be a grand thing for elopiiont of the South Tbe peo- 5t. Loins wanted more Yankees 're ot the people of the South to rcthc-r on uorumon ground. Tbe ofSt Louis were half Yankees ilf Southerners and they bad as- ed so thoroughly that you could 1 one from the other, iciiiil money guaranteed by St. cxcr-edpfl and ptions were corning in at tbe rate 000 per d.iy. while the act of the Si Louis in permitting the use >st Park as a site was equal to a ption of Si.000.000 more, nearing   the publication of tbe following "I have to-day signed a. contract with the Columbus American Association team, and resigned my position with the Players" League or Uroiherhood. I do this after a careful investigation anc feel tbat owe this explanation to my many friends and the base ball public. When I signed the Brotherhood contract 1 was led to behove the American Asso- ciation was dead. I find it now the same great It ever and J am proud to say I am again in a right place although my contract with the Brother- hood calls for more than I am to re ceive from the Columbus club.'' Spirited Political Debate in Senate. (essrs. Voorhees and Edmunds Lock Horna Over the Dudley Letter. Miner, and that th the Preparing for the udley He said that the days and weeks that oUoived the publication of this letter would al ways be remembered for the audacity and fecundity wuh which the self-evident Alsehoods were conceived and put forth by tbe Republican press to avert the odium and escape .he legal penalties of un organized attempt at wholesale bribery Mr. Voorhees criticised very sevtrely the part which Judce Woods as said to have taken in jreventmg the finding of a bill of Indictment against Oudlcj He said he desired to know whether the action of Distnct Attorney Cham- bers in ordering a United States Commissioner not to issue A warrant for Dudley s ariest was lUthonzed by the Attorney General, and he would like to know also what nght the District Attorney had to issue such an order. He thought Chambers should be dismissed, and that this w as the best opportunity the President would etcrh.Lve of ais-avowmg his sympathy with Dudley's crime Mr. Edmunds offered substitute for the res olution follows: "That the Attorney Geaer- al be and nerehy is instructed to inform the Senate u hat instructions, if any, the Depart- ment of Justice has given to S. N. Chambers, District Attorney for the district of Indiana, on Lhe subject of the arrest of W Dudley and lis exemption from ai rest, and by what author- "ty of law any such instructions have been ;iven; and that copies of such correspondence be transmitted to the Senate." Mr. Edmunds suggested that the Dudley let ter might hare been imitated from one which had been sent out bi Mr Whitaker, of Martins ville, Ind.. chairman of a Democratic county committee on Septembei 1, 1888 That letter (which he sent to the desk to be was, he said, the uv m of the Dudley letter He did not vouch for the letter but it was published in the Terra Haute Express Mr Edmunds spoUe at length about the 'al sheet frauds in Indiana in 1886, and referred to the fact that Sim Coy was not expelled by his Democratic brethren of the City Council of In dlanupolis, but drew pay as a member of that body while hu was serving the county m jail. He also rehearsed the charges that of the insane asylums and pauper institutions in Indi- ana had been taken to the polls and had voted the straight Democratic ticket. At the close of the discussion Mr. Edmunds' amendment was agreed to by a party vote of 31 to 24 After disposition of some routine matters the Senate went into secret session and ad jourued. Speaker laid before the House a letter from the Secretary of War, enclosing a petition from certain non-commissioned officers, prajing for an increase of pav The House then went into Coni'Tintec of the vVbole-'bn the-Dig' trict of Columbia Appropriation bilL The House passed the bill :m'l tuon adjourned until Friday FROM PRISON TO FREEDOM. fterea FrteoMn te a EB. Mr Ukwrty. PTSEVILLE, Ky., Jan. pris- oners confined the county jail made their escape about dark Tuesday evening. The plan of escape was a bold one and preyed quite successful. One of the jailor's sons, Newman Johnson, and a "trusty" were left in charge dur- ing the absence of jailor Johnson. The turnkey had just placed the key into the jail door lock, preparatory to ad- mitting the when the latter him and, disarming him, threw open the door, bidding his companions to come on. The jail contained nine prisoners and all escaped except two who were in for minor offenses and did not care to chance it. Among1 the escaped were two of the famous Turner gang, from Yellow Creek, charged with shooting Crow Carr, in Middleborough on Christmas day. A posse is in pursuit. The Turners are desperate men and it is thought if they once get among their friends they will not be recaptured without a fight. SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Jan. 9. Eight prisoners, all confined in one cell in the county jail here, escaped shortly after twelve o'clock Tuesday night. They cut a hole in the iron floor of the cell and knocked out a part of the wall and escaped. Of the eight prisoners six were being held for trial on charges of grand larceny. The other two were charged with murder. NOT A PARADISE. legislative Proceedings Events iu Ohio. Other COUNTED THE VOTE. DESTKOYEO BY FIBE. Offli-.-s of the Wettern UiU Cuiuiianyin LAMW DEATH THE PORK. Two Uuutlroit People Minnesota Tow a Suffer From State of AUSTIN, Minn., Jan. number of people arc A'cry ill with trichinosis at Brownsdalo, this township The total number of suiTereis is about 2SO, but only seven or eight are dangerously ill. A few days before Christmas a farmer named Schreck slaughtered four hogs and invited a number of his friends to dinner. Thirty-three people sat down to the meal, and a few days later all were taken sick. Other families bad been pieces of the meat and soon an alarming state of things prevailed, nearly the entire community being more or less affected. A local physician declared that the people were suffering from trichinosis, but no osc thought of serious conse- quences until Mr. Schreck's ten-year- old boy died. Then physicians from this place were called in, and the poo- pie became convinced that the trouble was a serious one. Chicago's Observance of Jmckjton Day. CHICAGO. Jan. Day was celebrated here by a street parade ol Democratic societies yesterday after- noon, followed in the evening by a me- morial meeting at Central Music Hail. Ex-Governor Proctor Knott. of Ken- tucky: Judge Benjamin I'atton, of Ohio, the only surviving representative of the Jackson administration, and General John F. Wheless. of Tennessee, deliv- ered addresses. On the platform was the desk upon which President Jackson wrote his famous veto of tho Banking bill, and also fho table upon which he wrote bis lim message to Congress. Keaclied AcrccmeatA ROCIIE--TKK. X. Y.. Jan. strained relations which have existed fc-r sonic time between local boot and shoe manufacturers and their emploves Seem to be about ended. Each mana- monthly assessments of thirty cents to j faclvrcr has been treating with own medical in cas" of ac- cident. About 500 men left the j-bop. A conference was refund tit" rr.tw-. i i oW Flint ran from apd ZW all and it is understood that in a ma- jority of the satisfactory WTC reached Wodafsdav. In of the facJori'-s the bare noi beta for or three a of it thov-btttiat tier irbt. dar arvj ST. Jan. Cear tongb Experience of a Party of American Who Thought They Had Found a Garden of Eden In Mexico. SAJI FRAXCISCO, Jan. latest news from the communistic colony at Topolobampo, in Sinaloa, Mex., is brought by C. C. Bemley, who joined a party from Kansas City last year. They were induced to join the colony by rep- resentations of the ideal life which was to be enjoyed on Topolobampo Bay. Remley took his family and supplies sufficient for a two years' stay. He re- mained four months, leaving last No- vember and coming up through Sonora overland, narrowly escaping from the bands of Yaqui Indians. He says the colonists now number 110, mostly old men and women, who have become so embittered by their disap- pointment that they are hard to live with. If these people had means to leave, there wouldn't be twenty remain- ing at tho place, but having put theii money in the general fund, they can time can't be cashed because are no funds. Remley says some of tbe land owned by the colony is good, but the colonists persisl in planting eastern seed, and they have tbws regularly lost their crops. The re- gnjar diet of the colonists is black-eyed beans and corn bread three times a day, and most are too poor to buy any meat. Tried to Murder the Bartender. CHICAGO, Jan. 9. Craved with liquor and armed with a revolver, Charles Buck attempted to murder Charles Stoeckle. a bartender in his mother's saloon, 200 Van Buren street, Tuesday evening. Four shots were fired, one o' which took effect in Stoeckle's left arm, while a random shot passed through the neck of Minnie Bader, an eleven-year- old niece of Mrs. Ruck, who was sitting in tbe saloon. Neither of the wounded persons is dangerously injured. Stoeck- le's attentions- to Mrs. Ruck were the cause of the shooting. Battle with LAREDO, Tex., Jan. An ment occurred Monday evening on the Salado river in Mexico, fifty miles south- west of this city, between a dozen cus- toms guards and four smugglers who were transporting a cargo of smuggled goods, principally prints, to the interior. In tbjd fight one of the smugglers killed and a portion of the goods cap- tured. The remaining three contra- bands escaped and managed to get off with a portion of the goods. None ol the guards were hurt. Rain and Snow Fall. MOXTICCT.LO, I1L. Jan. has fallen almost incessantly here and in southern Illinois since January 1. At a late hour Sunday night snow began fall- ing and the heaviest snow fall of season occurred. The heavy rain has overflowed the Sangamon river and the bottom lands are all submerged. At Docatnr the river is two feet higher than it was during tbe big flood of last summer. All small streams arc over- flowed. ______________ Bold Attempt to ftnb a Bank. SotAyiw. Pa.. Jan. A rode- into tbe town of on Tofsday and tied borv :n front of First National Kank.  'ot YOKK, Jan. The Star says that several members o' the .Souchorn Society opposed the recent adoption by the society of resolutions eulogistic of Jefferson Davis. There is also some op- position to the holding of a banquet in honor of General Lee on the 20th of this month. The dissentients admire the characters of Davis and Lee. but are afraid that by so publicly honoring the Confederate they will lose standing in Northern business circles- Frank Knapp. of Defiance, died early momicj: of pneumonia, on an Attack of la grippe. Hr had aot Jairycr 'or ca 5n. and tirci H" a fasii'r ia jr to a Notorious XF.W YORK. -Jan. 9. Mary Ann Don- nelly. the nurse who was by Eva Hamilton at Atlantic City, 3T. J.." last summer, and has sine'; been on exhibi- tion in a Itowery museum, has brought suit against Eva Hamilton and Robert Ray Hamilton for damages al- leged to hare been incurred by rcatoa Of tbe assault. Mrs. Donnelly to hare permanently lost tho strength of the left side of her body, necessitating constant recourw? to medical aid. Alt Y'.KK. .T.ITJ. The Men's Democratic Club trndcro.l a ban- quet at ih'- Hoffaian lastnicht to of Iowa: Caarp- of Ohio: McKinn'-y. of Abbrii. of of of I've door, cxrca v-d i.s In tot Tool in 
                            

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