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Salem Daily News: Tuesday, January 7, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - January 7, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SALEM DAILY NEWS. OL. IL NO- 5. SALEM. OHIO, TUESDAY, JANUARY 7. 1890. TWO CENTS. General Assem- bly Convenes. Elected in Both Houses-Bills Introduced. BVS Jan. Sen- it ten a. m., with Lieutenant r Lyon m the chair. There were all the Senators-elect except er cf Columbians a Republican, uorswere sworn in by Judge 1 of the Ohio Supreme Court. inization of the Senate was then thenommeesof tho Democratic eircr elected and sworn in as President pro tern., Perry M. of Seneca County; chief clerk Tavlor. of Franklin; journal n "Fisk, of Morrow; message r Kafv of Hancock; engross- O'Uagan, of Erie; T clerk, .James Ireland, of jrdinVclerk, >liss Leal H' Rob- f Shelby: sergeant-at-arms, Cap- fl M'H-tley. of Coshocton: first Ca'los E. Trevitt. of Franklin; A. Yarley, of Athens. Com- v-pre appointed as follows: To Vie Governor, Messrs Cole, d Huraphrovs; to prepare a list committees, Messrs. Adams, Corcoran, Ryan, Mas- Kerr on the inauguration of >r Campbell, Messrs Van Cleaf, aml Massie. A joint resolu- 5 offered by Mr. Brown and pauii" tribute to the metn- tne fate George H. Pen- Mr Moirison offered a joint TO which was adopted, pro- the bridging of the mor. He also introduced a bill Je foi the payment by the State per ueek for each insane patient a county or city infirmary on ac- th" crowded condition of the in that district. Mr. Oren intro- lull w prevent trusts, pools and or combinations that restrict mil production and increase the ptoJucts. Mr Reed introduced rovidms? that distiict assessors IP notice to property holders ol lation placed on their buildings decennial land appraisement, uelg, of Hamilton County, was ed Can additional sergeant-at- ton o'clock Secretary of .miel J. Ryan called the House Gcm-ral Assembly to nd the o.ith of office was admin to the members by Judge Will- f thp S- p'-eme Court. Messrs of Chirip'ign. and McDermott, inzmri. tt-M" Appointed to act as or "tii" The rit-s he H nib (.1 li-tvd after the mem- rt sworn in showed the presence mu.iM -i The absentees were Coaa h-.-lby: Eggerman hn: Kcan. of Carroll: Knapp. o e aiyl f.awl'-i, of l-'r-vnk'in. Mr as but did not answer tc 1 Three of the other gentle iissrs Cutint-s. Knapp Law -e .i.i-ont on account of sickness leru v-ix- lour Democrats out i the ibhcans present, ther iir nn tilt- majority side. It was lluru opportunity for the Re n.s delav the i eifo" v.as m-idc to do this, t: the election of a r. ami .Seal 11. Hysell. Democrat, and a. C. Saylin, Republican, n. -Ai-re nominated. The Demo- r.'-d fur form jr. The Kepnh- Spencer, of Wood, >M.T. of w ho wt-ro paired J' Knapp of Dotianct'. and of Kr.ir.khn. voted for the lat- Hi-Nell received 55 vote-; and ..in M. Mex-rs. Forbes, of Cosh- EVTO3IBED. I teacue of Five Imprisoned Miners by Two of Their fellow Escape From Death. WILKKSBAUUE, Pa., Jan. the Nottingham mine in he disastrous cave-in occurred last terrible accident was averted astevening. About seven o'clock a ter- ific explosion of gas took place. There ad been a heavy fall of coal and this orced the gas toward the shaft, but on ts way it was ignited by tho naked amps of the miners and exploded. The )Kittic work of the timber caught fire at nee and burned fiercely. Five men were caught between the cave-in and he fire and all manner of exits cut off. The report spread that the men were lead and in a few minutes hundreds of men, women and children gathered at mouth of the slope waiting to see ;he dead bodies hoisted out. The wives and children of the imprisoned men bo- came and their grief was ter- rible to behold. About half an hour after the fire broke out John D. Humphreys and John Rich- ards were lowered into tho mine. When they reached the fire they heard shouts on the other side Putting their hands sefore their faces they through ;he fire and dragged the five imprisoned men out onp by oue, uninjured. When they reachiTl anxious crowd above, the rescued men and heroes were re- ceived with shouts of welcome. Thomas Richards, who was in another part of the mine, wai severely burned bv the explo- sion and it is feared he can not recover. Part of the workings of this mine aro located under the Susquehanna river and the minors staro that water is ooz- ing in where the cave-in occurred last week. They fear the nver may break into the mine- Many would be drowned out beyond hope of reclaiming them and operations would have to be suspended. ___________ POISON Used br Dr. Knlflln. of Troiiton, X. ,T., In a Valii Emlcaior to Enil His Life. TKENTOV, N. J., Jan Kniffin made an unsuccessful attempt upon his life Monday morning With his pocket- knife he made a gash three inches long in the right side of hib throat, from which he blc-d profusely. Before cutting himself he swallowed one ounce of tinc- ture of aconite His stomach refused to retain the poison and it is due to this fact that ho is btill alive. He was dis- covered by David Purci-11. brother of Miss Purcell, who stopped the f -w of blood. The knife wouuds are nui. sfri- Mcetlugr of tke Magnates Rochester, N. Y. at Syracuse Admitted to The Single Umpire System Adopted. ous. The people demand the arrest of Dr. Kmflin and Miss Puiceli. The doctor's attempt on his life is regarded as con- clusive evidence of his guilt and is con- sidered equivalent to a confession. JDr. Kuiffin s.iys he did the because his troubles were more than he could bear. He said his mind became totally un- hinged. and in a momont of rashness he tried to take his 1 if ti- lt is stated that the attempted suicide of Dr. KnitSn occurred about two hours after his counsel left him. They had bet-n in lengthy consultation. Purcell is still confined to her room and is in a. hysterical condition. ForfriteA Franchise.) SAN FKANCI.-CO. Jan. 7. Judge Wal- laee in the SuyHor Court yesterday de- ridfd the ca-e the American Refining 5 10 the on act" 'in! o' come a wml The- acu, n was -hf Siato some time forfriture of the charter the having be- -T of th" trust. The n: Siy'.in were appointed a com- j court thru by joining 'he trr.'-t the the Speaker to tho a brief address "r mtmbtT's for the honor cii him. A. C. of Mr. Hudson, of CHnu.n. wcro for pro Mr. n -.xai by tlie Same. votO The Uemocratic caucus ;he Speaker and inpmnc-ntinjT ibo "f as lu-vvl F. of llardin: company abandoned all the and objects for :t by iho law of California and forfoiKt! its corporate fr mcnt is against the company. Wpnt Bri X. Y.. -1n.n. 7. night a wreck Kail a! Pa. Visiting Clutw AVill Receive Forty Fei Cent, of Gate Elected and Committees Appointed. ROCHESTER, X. Y., Jan. meet- ing of the board of directors of the Ameri- can Association began at eleven o'clock Monday morning at the Livingston Hotel. President Zach Phelps presided. Columbus, Louisville, St. Louis and the Athletics resigned from all committees to give the new clubs a chance. Tne old officers also resigned and the following were elected: President, Z. Phelps, of Louisville; vice president, General Henry Brinker, Rochebter. Board of St. Louis, To- ledo, Syracuse. Committee on Playing Louisville, Rochester. Board of YV. Ti_ur- man, of Columbus: J J. O'Xeil. of St. Louis, and 7. Phelps, of Louisville. Fi- nance St. Louis and Athletic. Schedule lumbus, T.ouisville, Philadelphia. Syra- cuse was formally admitted to member- ship. The finance committee was authorized to select anJ elect to membership the eighth club. The application of Balti- more for membership was laid on the table, owing to somD objectionable fea- tures in the organization of that club It will probably be admitted when these defects have been remedied. It was de- cided that each club must file an ap- proved bond of to guarantee that it will in the Association through out the season. It was voted that the Association should have but eight clubs for 1S90. The single umpire system was adopted. The question as to salaries was left to tho president, with the un- derstanding that they must be lower than last year. Umpires must report- for duty to local managers before a. m. on the day of the game. Visiting clubs are to receive forty per cent, of the gate receipts, instead of twenty per cent. as heretofore, and on Decoration Day and the Fourth of July they are to get fifty per cent. The pres- ident was authorized to appoint umpires The applicants for positions as umpires are: Emsley, of St. Tho' Ont.; Larry Corcoran, of Newark i'. J.- James E. Peeples. of Cincinnati; Jonn T. Uunt. of the Central Le -gue. of Illinois, Maple Doran, of Johnstown, Pa.. T. G. Con- noil, of i'Ml jL-ipnia: J. Daly, of B-cok- lyn: Curr-, Philadelphia, and M_ J. _. of AVaco, Tex. Tbfi solic.i- ule co .aittec will meet Syracuse c March 10. when the scv ..-ill be de- upon. ____ K E KOFEXEJEX PLOSION. Establishment Destroyed and One YTorkman Burned to Death. MANTSTEE. Mich.. Jan. explo- sion of a kerosene lamp yesterday morn- ing catr id the total loss of the Filer- i Manufacturing Company's factory M. i.his city, and the of the life an employe name 1 William Chambers. Chr.rcV-rs was employed in the fin- ishing department of the factory, which is constructed of wood. Desirous 01 be- ginning work before uaj-hght sot in. he borrowed a lamp from another work- man, but on attempting to light it tire exploded. Betting fire to tho varnish and to The clothing of the unforuinaie man. The factorr was in in the Senate and HoOMl of Reprencotati WASHINGTON, Jan. the Sen- ate yesterday a number of bills and resolutions were Introduced. Among ine pctiuoos pre- sented were two from Kansas Texas, the first urging the selection of Chicago and second the selection or. St. Louis as a lor the Fair of 1992. Mr. Plumb ottered a resolution, which, was Agreed directing the managers of the Na- tional Soldiers' Home to report on the advisa- bility of establishing a hospital at Hot Springs, Ark., for disabled Union soldiers Mr. Call offered a long resolution setting forth the fact that the bonded debt of the ibland of was held by German bankers; that they controlled the financial and political policy of the Island: that as neither Cuba nor Spam world be able to repay this money an alliance between the German empire and Spain would be the natural result; and declaring that in the of toe Senate anything done in the island of Cuba tending to transfer the financial and political control of the island to any European power is contrary to the best interests of the united States and be discountenanced It also requests the President to furnish the Sen- ate such information as the State Department may possess on tne subject. Mr. Sherman objected to the immediate con- sideration of riit resolution and it went to the Committee on Foreign Relations. Mr. Dawes osTered a resolution, which was agreed to, culling on the Postmaster General for information as to the proposed connection ot the Postofflee Department with the telesfraph companies, tind at, to the probable cost of con struction of an independent Government tolo graph line betw ecu the cities of St Louis, Chi- cago, Philadelphia and New York. The bill increasing the pay of census super- visors from 8.TUO to as passed The bill increasing the pension of soldiers and sailors totally helpless to ?7S a month was passed The bill to provide for the disposal ol certain public lands in Alabama w as debated at some length and went over without action. The Senate went into secret session and then utl journed. feature of the House proceed ings was the introduction of bills under the call of States The chaplain invoked me protec- tion for Mr. Kelley, of ama, is se- rionsly ill. On motion of Mr. Carlisle the Speaker was au thorized to administer the oath of oincc to Mr Randall at his home. Messrs. Wilbur, of New YorK, and Whitthorne, of Tennessee were au thorized to take the oath of omce before propel officers. The States were then called for the mtroduc tson and reference of bills. At the conclusior of the call of States, the Speaker announced the following appointments: Regents of tht Smithsonian Institution: Representatives But terworth. Lodge and Wheeler. The House ther adjourned. INSTALLED IN OFFICE. CAPITAL Speaker Reed Prepares a New Code of Itules For the Government of the House oi Changes. READY FOR A STRIKE. Associate Justice Takes His Seat on the Supreme lieuch. Jan. J. Brew er, the new Associate Justice of the Su- preme Court of the United States, as- sumed the duties of his office Monday. The court reassembled at noon, Chiel Justice Fuller presiding-. The new As- sociate Justice followed the Justices in. accompanied by Justice Strong, retired. He was attired in the black robe o) office. He took a seat at the clerk's desk while the marshal opened the court, The Chief Justice arose and announced that the commission of the new Associ- ate Justice was in the clerk's hands and called upon the clerk to read it. The reading over, the new Associate Justice arose and read aloud the oath of office. The marshal then escorted Justice Brewer to his seat on the extreme left of the Chief Justice, the Chief Justice ind the Associate Justices bowing to him as he passed. The regular business the court was then taken up. a num- of decisions being read. I ?JEN KILLED Site of the Woi-M'f Fair About to lieforn a Senate Election WASHIXOTOX, Jan. Reed has prepared a code of rules for the House which he will submit to the Com- mittee on Rules at its meeting to-day. Mr. Reed will not make public this code, but rumor has it that a number of radi- cal and important changes are included in it. Atnone other things it is said that he proposes to re-establish the morning hour abolished some years ago, which the rules governing the Senate have long provided for; that he proposes that the. rules make no reference to the mo- tions for recess and to adjourn for a time, which have, under the rules of past House, beon privileged motions and have been much used in filibuster- ing; that he proposes that the quorum to do business in Committee of the Whole be reduced to 100: and that he proposes that new legislation originaV in? with the Appropriations Committee be permitted on appropriation bills. Tho Senate Committee on the Quadri- centonuial will begin us hearings on the cldiuib of 'Washington, New York. St. Louis and Chicago to the World's Fair of on Wednesday. The delegation representing St. Louis arrived in the city yesterday. The Chicago delegation is already hero and the delegation from New York is expected to-day. No has been adopted as to the hearings, but a time limit will probably be put on all speeches, and each of the cities repre- sented will be allowed a certain length of time in which to present its claims. All of the cities are hopeful and there is a wide divergence of opinion as to the outcome of the fight. The hearings in the several contested election cases in the House will begin before the House Committee on Elec- tions to-day. The West Virginia case of Smith vs. Jackson will be the first considered. J. M. Jackson (Dem.) re- ceived a plurality of three votes in the Foivth district. Charlos B. Smith, tho contestant, alleges illegal voting, er- rors, improper returns, etc. The vote certified was: Jackson, Smith, ________________ NEW POLITICAL MOVE. of the Ktoc-k Yards Kcbel Airainit a Contract anil the Dtaf Maj Remit In a Lockout. CHICAGO, Jan. point: the possibility of another strike the Stock Yards. The men are dissatis- fied with the contract they were obliged, to sign at Ae conclusion of the former- big strike. By the terms of it the nuens. were compelled to deposit certaia aroount of their wages with their em- ployers and lo give two weeks" notico before any action to strike. Recently some of the coopers in the employ of Swift Co. rebelled against the con- tract and were discharged. Since that time they have been agitating the ques- tion and the talk resulted in two big- meetings Sunday. No decided action was taken at either meeting, but the line of discussion at both indicated that the men feel they have a serious griev- ance which must be righted in some- wanner. Other meetings are to be held, in the near future. DAKIXG A Chicago t'p in Ownr by Five .Robbers Wlio Carried O1T Everything of Value. CHICAGO, Jan. of 57 Liberty street, was lying on a in bis parloi Sunday afternoon when five men broke in the front door. Though unmasked they dashed at him a Train on the I'ennsylvania Kallroad Unlucky Trip. To., Jan. mail trait the Pennsylvania ,i .g-ht killed two men at Tyront .aem being the train dis- patcher. The o.her is not yet identified. They were walking on the track when struck. At Den's C-cek. about twelve miles east of nere. ue train also struck and instantly killed two -aen. supposed to be s. "'i thv. employ of the Pennsylvania ra .1 They stepped in front of the vnd were terri- bly tnar.ffled. Two further down foil ?.s in a few and the man the road from here tt. writhing ir death throes. Th- I omnibus and other -_ n i, .-I bz_ -fly time to T--SH s-i'VHKt: insurance Vlati forElcctcr.il Kcfmci. N. Y.. Jan. Lin- son has prepared his Ekertom.1 Reform It provides for rejistrulion in ail and Omci.il or The an train struck an a woman. II r 7. opinion -i yesterday in the well known the Supreme Court holds that silk and cotton ribbons used ex- clusively as hat trimmings are dutiable at twenty per cent., under the provision in the tariff of for "trimmings for bats, and hoods" and not at fifty per cent., under the provision for materials of which silk is en- j of chief Taltif. The (jo the by this oprision be compelled ;o to importers in delphia. New York and other places. tnr Their HIAWATHA. Kan.. J.-in. C froni the staircase of .rlr Monday th< he Formed in Oliirlunatl YThicli ts Said to Control Ob- jects. CixctXNATi. Jan. organization has been formed in this city embracing in its membership all the labor and sev- eral of the Gorman bodies. Its purpose is to watch public officials and exercise its influence by means of pet.tions to legislative bodies. It is claimed by its leaders that 30.000 Cincinnati voters can be reached within days, so per- fect is its organization. The following organizations send delegates to the body, which is known as ''the Municipal Con- Central Labor Council: Amal- gamated Council of Huildmg Trades: District No. 4S, K. of L-; National Club: Single Tax Club; League for Liberty and Right. Tho organization is thor- oughly Democratic. Wealth Glimmering. Jan. Charles Akins' jew- elry store. 310 Washington street was robbed of property valued at over SI.000 last night by live young men who fas- tened the door ouU-ide with a bar of wood and broke in the show window, grabbed all the watches that they couM gather up and down the street be- fore the people in the store could get outside. The robbers have not yet been captured. _______________ of the CITV. Jan. first bliz- zard of the. struck this section Sutidav nifjiit and continued all day. Ln.st a heavy snow fell. Reports from sbov.- and knockod him dow Struggling to his feet he grappled "with one of his assailants and floored him. He was quickly seized by the others, dragged! from their prostrate companion andt firmly held by two of them while the other three went through the house and robbed it of all valuable portable prop- erty. Bloch, being a poor man, there was. little for the robbers to secure, but such as there was was carried away. On leav- ing they tied Bloch, who was the only- one of family in the house at the- time. On their departure lie freed him- self and gave the alarm. No arrests- have been made._______- _ STORY DISASTER. Three Accidents on Western Kail- rimd Result from a Snow Storm. SAX FnAXCisco. Jan. storm has caused great damage to the Oregon Railroad igation Company's road. Three accidents, each attended with fatal results, have been Fireman Cross was seriously scalded Sunday at Hood Rh or. Fireman Orvis was killed in a collision between n, freight and a passenger train near Wil- lows Sunday night. It is rumored that, txvo men were kilk-d and thirteen per- sons injured on the same road at Riparia, but this is unconfirmed The first train from Spokane in iivu days arrived hero yesterday Eight eneinos have bpon. demolished on the road. The heaviest snow stoita in yeais is prevailing. Thft thermometer is below zero. A Bright Intellect by Rum. PUEIU.O. Col., Jan. Parker was found dead Sunday in a South Sido saloon. It was the striking ending of a remarkable life. For years one of the most eminent preachers of the Metho- Sist church in New York, he became a drunkard and outcast, wandered to Pueblo, reformed and again joined tha church. His reformation lasted for a year, during which time he did editorial work and demonstrated rare ability. His last fall was complete, all efforts of friends being useless. Re leaves a fam- Hy in Indiana.____________ Kacr War lielween Soldiers. Kan.. Jan. Saturday night two parties of United States soldiers, of the Ninth cavalry, one colored and the other white, were returning to the fort from Lcavenwonh, when Charles Harrison, one of tho col- ored men, insulted one of the white- soldiers. A free fight ensued. The white xien used cuspidors and the "ne- groes their razors. Two nejrroes were severely injured None of the whites were injured. The car in which fight occurred was totally wrecked. With Forcerr- PF.NVEII. Col.. Jan Leach, that, the storm es- jr'-n'-ral of the River and Rail Snow are enter- throughout State. all dar in Kansas and tained railway rhatatrain n-ill The temperature i low. near the zero r 1 Company, has i-een arrf-t'-d. b- srrretarr Reed, of com- pany, ti-ith forpcry and the appropria- tion of SS.OOO of the frnds bis otrn The allegation is that ail'-red tbc contract between him- self and the company so :hat be tias able V) draw acre his services than had been aprecd upon. Cal.. Jaa. Cfts- tral I'ariSc line tbe Sierra Nevada. Mountains 3 carman MU Wife. T.-0-r.Ux JiS ati Kntlrr Kamllr. W. .tan. 7. Church, a r.-jth his fa'h'-r near this with the entire fatnily r on 33 their H. IV i- r m ti. i -J   

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