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Salem Daily News Newspaper Archive: January 6, 1890 - Page 1

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   Salem Daily News, The (Newspaper) - January 6, 1890, Salem, Ohio                               THE SAiEM DAILY NEWS. OL. II, NO SALEM. OHIO, MONDAY, JANUARY 6. 1890. TWO CENTS. for Heuip, Cotton Gkxxls. Jute and Discussion on the Causes le'ults of the Recent "Cor-j. iu Jnte uel One of the ol r Refuses to Give Satisfaction. Jan. hearing ije Ways and Means Committee interested inflax. hemp, jute and 00ds was begun Saturday. L. more, of Boston, opened with an it favoring the removal of the x imposed on flax, so as to en- homo manufacturer to compete foreigner. r-irner. Jr., of Boston, president and Hemp Spinners' and argued in favor of of these goods, claiming would develop the manufacture of which this country is tho in the world. of New Jersey, then ad- ihe committee. He represented or the flax dressing trade, cd iu of an increase in the dressed flax: fromSW to 850 per 3 be-in? necessary for the protec- bome labor. He presented sam- l explained the process of dress- i the old country he said a man 1 ton for dressing flax; would roccive S04 for the same a liontlcy, of New Brighton, kt addressed the committee in retaining tho present duty on sisal and jute. If this had nc heretofore, instead of being from time to time, he said, no r iru.su would have been possible, iajg-ing would have been mado iiiiJaUi; hemp and flax, and home ition would have kept the price us E Pcarce, of St. Louis, road iipnt showing 1 surplus of ca- rt 2J.OOO.OOO yards of cotton bag- i the existing factories in this Tho removal of duty ho would ruin the jute bagging in- and would not for many years illy reduce tho cost of bagging. xl'tbat if juto butts be left at rate of duty the rate on i-tured bagging bo made per ml tli.it if the raw material be the free list the manufactured j be redui-ed to reduction itv per Mr. Pearcc asked the desired changes bo made tho ons of the law be postponed to ryl. IS'.'I. so as to give man li- es an opportunity to prepare for bwer to a question of Mr. McMil- Pf arcn admitted that a corner had been run in 13SS. a result eclinsf incident to the introduc- the Mills bill. The contracts lade, he said, expired with the No trust existed and none had In explanation of his state- .onccrning the Mills bill, Mr. s.iid that when the Mills bill was J tho political influence behind jt such characLT that there was that it would be passed. ar demoralized tho market and "nagging was thrown on the in Memphis at cents a yard To prevent the ruin of their s-even gentlemen got together nijrht up all the bagging they iy their hands on and MiUin aroused the witness' ire whether ho had not -.mr-rs of bagging by advancing c fro-n to 12J  make a hurried ro treat to the front room. AVhile there he heard the report of a pistol and on retracing his steps lo tho bedroom he found that Franklin had himself through the left breast and had fallen over on the bed. The officer then admitted the other policemen and thev found that tho man was not yet dead, hut that .Mrs. Prank- lin and the child were dead on the bed. Surgeon Held was siunraoned, but be- fore he arrived Franklin was dead. Tho sursreon examined the bodi< s of Mrs. Franklin and thi, child and found that the woman Lad been shot through the head and that the child had been strangled to death. It was his opinion that they had both been dr ad for two or three days. The officers say that Franklin never spoke before or after shooting himself, but every thing indi- cates that the man was insane. Franklin left a letter for Henry YV. Faust, of San Francisco. The letter to Faust states that his wife and he had decided to die togothcr, but she held back when the time came. Sometimes she asked him to kill her by poison when she would not know it. Lift; was im- possible. They hud a terrible, experi- ence. He felt that he was insane. The writer throughout referred to his wife as his darling, his pet. his best friend, etc._____________ INFLUENZA. An Infallible Cure for the He- luted by a Russian. ST. Jan. Mr. Robert a native of St. Petersburg. Russia, a commercial traveler of this city, in- forms the press that "la grippe" is a well known disease in Russia, originat- ing among the lower classes because of a lack of cleanliness. It is infectious to a great degree and partakes- of the na- ture of nasal catarrh. A simple remedy for it. which cures at once, if taken dur- ing the ilrst stages, is as follows: jTalf a glass of boiling milk mi-ed with the same quantity of genuine imported Ger- man seltzer. Mr. Ebell says this reme- dy is used with such success in Russia that the government officially promul- gated it. Adjutant General Keltoii plaius Its AVorkiugs. Ex- Statement the Plan Be- cently Introduced iu the United States Army. Violent Opposition to the New Order of Tilings on the Tart of Post Whose are Thereby. WASHINGTON, Jan. recent in- troduction of the "canteen" system into the array, and the announcement that the post traders, whose calling is there- by endangered and in some instances superseded, aro about to make common cause boforo Congivss., has called public attention to a subject that is fraught with the highest importance to the army. So little is. known, however, to the uninitiated and so little meaning is conveyed by the term to the non-military mind, that the following statement, from Adjutant General Kel- ton. concerning tho system will be of in- terest. General Kelton says: The canteen system of the Uritish army is now re- garded as among the most important fasten a of its administration. On its present basis, it is in effect the co- operative store of the regiment. There is a wet canteon and a dry canteen. The former is practically the club room, aud is fitted up with a library and reading room, a room for games and others for refreshments: for all of which privileges the soldier pays a monthly subscription of two ponce. The bill of fare is of large variety and the charges exceedingly low. The dry canteen is the same as the post trader's store in our service, but where all articles of general merchan- dise are sold at rates slightly exceeding the cost. These are managed by a coni- nutfeo of officets and non-commissioned officers, under tho supervision of tho commandant. There is a treasurer, an accountant and a steward. Every thing is sold for cash and the money is lodged" in bank, tho amount of profits averag- ing some S'3.000 a year to each regiment. Of tho profits, every penny goes for the benefit of the soldier, in supplying tra dinners, papers and games for the club room, for the regimental sports and dishes for tho messes. In short, the canteen is among the most important features of garrison life in Europe. In tho French and German, armies the system is not so thorough as in England, but in all the co-operative features it is permanent, and all are un- der military supervision. Practically, this is the canteen system which is now being introduced: into our army, and which may ultimately super- sede the post trader system; not because the latter is a special mark for disap- proval, but because the canteen is for the greater benefit of the soldier, and because the two systems are irreconcil- able. CONGRESSIONAL WORK. Among the During the Coining Week. Jan. It will take Congress almost the whole of the com- iig week to get down to business again. The Senate will take up the current of affairs more quietly and naturally than ;he House. There may be a resumption of the Brazilian discussion. A quantity of executive business will doubtless bo disposed of and a day will be fixed probably in the near for a dis- sussion of tho question between Senators Hutler and Ingalls. An effort will be made at an early day to put through both houses the bill establish- ing a form of government in Oklahoma. On the FIouso side of the Capitol tho Ways and Means Committee will con- tinue its bearings on the tariff and tho bulk of interest will attach to them. Very little will be done during the week except to organize the committees appointed just prior to the recess ad- journment. and possibly to begin discussion of the report of the Com- mittee on Rules. Sonic fear is expressed on the Democratic side that an effort will be made to dispose of the contested election cases on a partisan basis before the rules are adopted. The Committee on Rules is not ready to make a report and may not be ready tbj.s week. The debate on the rules will probably bo protracted. _ ______ STKIKE SETTLED. the Markey Railroad System L aud frame Will be v Died from Hydrophobia. PINE Jan. was a sad death here from hydrophobia Sun- day afternoon. George Dosey, eight years old, son of Julius Dosey. of this place, was bitten some four weeks ago by a clog that had acted strangely for some days and was supposed to be rabid. He was killed by the village marshal. A few days tho little one was taken ill and. after scve'ral days, of severe suffer- ing, died. The attending physician pro- nounced the symptoms as those which belong to hydrophobia. Killed by a Kallinjc Tree. AV.VV.ASU, Tnd.. Jan. 0. William TVcaver. a voung farmer, was instantly killed Saturday while cutting- timber in Pawpaw township, this county. A large tree which Weaver was felling crashed against other trees in its descent and the limbs were drawn back and then suddenly released. The rebound of a lanre branch caught Weaver in the fore- head, splitting a hole in bis skull from which the brains ITo scarcely broathr-d after thr- blow. He leaves a wife and three children. o New York, w.-vs a i .-in '-xlr-ndc-d .arcrii-ji'-nt in vr-a-si- of on all cot- th.it, tho   work in as many players as possi- ble and educate them up to the League standard. It will r.otdoto permit tho Brotherhood, or any similar organization of players, to gain the mastery, or im- agine they have tho League at their mercy, and events the past few weeks havo justified the directors of tho League in their determination to pursue this course. Already there aro upon my books applications from upwards of 300 players located in all parts of the United States who aro anxious to enlist under the League banner, and many of them will undoubtedly prove decided acquisi- tions to our ranks." FATAL STREET FIGHT. day- th-- C' 151 A Va... Oliio Democratic Cauotii O., Jan. tho IIouso legislative caucus of Democrats Satur- dav. Ilysell, of Perry County, was nom- inated for Speaker; Robcson. of Darke, for Speaker pro tern., and Fisher, of Hardin. for clerk. In the Senate cau- cus, Adams, of Seneca, was nominated for president pro tern.; Taylor, of Frank- lin, for clerk, and Mortley. of Coshoc- ton, for sergeant-at-arms. Agreed to Sell Their J'lanU. NEW YOKK, Jan. have been rumors in the paper trade for months of biff sales of manufactuaing plants to combinations representing EnR-lish cap- itai. It is now stated positively that four companies havintr plants in this State and furnishinir the greater part of tho news paper used in this city havo sisrtiod agreements to sell to an English investment company. nd Ftinrntl- Hf-nry W. Winklf-r. a) S-jndav in KrTnrm- Y. -1 Jan. tho r'-mains of Hon. (.rcorirc II. JJoker "vcro borne Saturday to thfir last resting ri'-ac'.- in North Lntir'-l Hill funeral -.vas strictly private, bnt jv-r.- :x-injr the resi- J, W V and and iii- to Tfcy S--.K Jar., Tiro Jlen Shot and Mortally Wounded In a Town. ito., Jan. street fight occurred here Saturday, in which two ruon were shotand fatally wounded. John Hayes, a letter-carrier, was walk- Ing down Main street his cousin, Mike Uays. when they met two negroes named Robbins and Anderson. Tho Hayes boys brushed past the negroes roughly, and the latter retaliated by pushing them off the sidewalk. Mike Haves then drew his revolver and fired three times at the negroes. Two of tho balls took effect, one passing through the body of Robbins and the other pen- etrating the left side of John Hayes. Both men were fatally wounded. Mike Hayes was drnnk at the time of tho shooting. He was arrested. A "BULLET TN HIS BIIAIN. End.i the Earthly Career of a Guest of a 'Washington Hotel tVho Concealed His Identity. WASHINGTON, Jan. man about thirty years old. who registered at the Trcmont louse Saturday night as John Smith, of "Washington, Pa., was found lying dead in his room Sunday afternoon with a revolver by his side and a bullet in his brain. F'oth the name and tho place of residence entered on the hotel register aro supposed to be fictitious, as telegraphic inquiries sent to Washing- ton, Pa., fail to bring any response of identity. Ono hundred and sixty-eight dollars were found in his pockets, and from a memoranda of expenses found he is supposed to have boon a traveling man for dome commercial house. Beached Vort After an Kvcntfnt Trip. SAX Kr.AXCi.To. Jan. Pacific Coast Steamship Company's over-dae Steamer California, from Portland. arrived hf-rf- yostf-rday. Captain Ack- ley reports that the shaft broke and thf wheels struck tbo stern post with a hr-avy shock, disabling tho steamf-r entirely. Heavy were running at the All sails wro im- to make ship drift and keep h'-r in trim. Whf-n mil'-s from San 'Fran'-iso" tli" IMie' carno took ih'- stcanaer in tow and lir'f.iiht IKT to port.. LATEST NEWS ITEMS. by Front all Farta 0t KM-tlk. Daniel Lyons, the well-known variety song and dance artist, died at his home, Somerville, Mass., the other day, aged thirty-one. Dr. Ebenc-zer Dodge, president of Mad- ison University since 18'jS, died recent- ly at his home in Hamilton, Y., aged seventy years. Dr. George W. Wagoner, local member of the State Board of Health, says there- are 400 to 500 cases of influenza in Johnstown, Pa. Tho British steamer Cloncurry, from Liverpool for Rangoon, has been sunk in Sue-d Bay in a collision with the Brit- ish steamer Maplo Branch. A hot spring, whost- water has valu- able medicmal properties, has been dis- covered on the shore Lake Garda, one of the most popula of Italian re- sorts. The Treasury Department's monthly statement of changes in the circulation a net increase during the past month of December aggregating OHJ.-2'Jl. Many deaths are reported at Borhn as occurring from influenza. Among the prominent persons afllureil with tho disease in a serious form is the I'rincess Bismarck. Frank H'-rald. the pugilist, and Prod Mason, an old-time confidence man. have- boon arrested at Philadelphia, charged with victimizing passengerson trains by card games. The Northern National P.ank. of Phil- adelphia, capital and the Hal- linger National Bank, of T'.allinger. Tox.. capital have been author- ized to commence business. Among the passengers arriving recent- ly at New York from Liverpool was Orell." the noted French satirist and humorist, who is about to deliver a Bcrios of lectures in this country. The remains of Mile. Dracourt, the govcrnpssof Princf.-s who hurnorl to death in the fire that de- stroyed tho royal palace at Laeken. Bel- gium, have been found'in the ruins. The claims set forth by Portugal to territory iu Southeast Airica include five British settlements, in the mainten- ance and development of which havo expended by British Four loggers were to death at Beebc's camp, up the Tennessee river, seventy-five allies from I'uilucah. Ky., the other night, by their cabin taking: fire. Two of htcm were brothers named Dyer, and tho others n.uncd Colron and Somcrs. It is supposed they were all in- toxicated when the cabin ignited from the chimney. N, Jan. A severe storm pre- vailed throughout Great Uritain yester- day. causing- considerable damage at several points. The gale extended souio distance off coast and a number of wrecks are reported. The Protestant- church at itirr. Ireland, was shattered by a stroke of lightning. THE IVLVKkKiS. FrovUion. YOKK. Jan. Clos.eU 'it- per bills Exchange closed steady. Posted raic actual nvtos tT9si for sixty for dCDiaisd. Government bonds closed stoarty. Currency Os at 1U5. 4s, coupon, at do at Cr.EVEi.AXD. Jan. Country made at MiuuesoW patent al 55.SX5S.30. MinnUftOta spring at ?s W. New No. reu al Sio, uew No. 3 red at 78c. High mixed at No. red at 37c. No. 2 mixed atiMc. No. 2 white at 27c. No. 1 mixed at 26c. Fancy creamery at r.airy al Nu-.v York nt l-'c. Ohio at He. Stricily atate. Ohio at per bush'.-L. NEW YOKK. Jan. Dull and un- chan-ed. Fine at f at Minnesota extras at citv mili at ?1 and steady. No. 2 winter at STc. do January at do February at S7c, do March at 2 tni.vd at do January al Fel'marr al.TTSc. do M-irch at at tof inspected. L Jaacary at Jfl.13. Fe'.'ruary al Sat i'.r.e at 1st. Jan. Janoary at TSo Fcl-ruarv a; January at at March al i iATs-4.-inu.iry and at Jaanaryal March at _ February a; March at _ January al 'li'J'j. r iry at JSarO: al Jan. FOKT '-n-'T. ih" U'.iyn Ca C-ii a: Me. o. 2 -wtilc al 245.C. nr frotn a :-T'- ardar -with ill -3 iill'fei ffilS .-X'JMJ i 'i-l T -i. 'y- '.r i f I 4   

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