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Portsmouth Valley Sentinel Newspaper Archive: April 5, 1916 - Page 1

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Publication: Portsmouth Valley Sentinel

Location: Portsmouth, Ohio

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   Valley Sentinel, The (Newspaper) - April 5, 1916, Portsmouth, Ohio                               THE VALLEY SENTINEL VOLUME 54. (Associated Press Leased Wire) PORTSMOUTH, OHIO, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5, 1916. (Associated Press Leased Wire) NUMBER 53. IGHTING IN MEXICO IS REPORTED RESULT OF CLASH WAS NOT LEARNED; TROOPS ON HEELS OF BANDIT LEADER 1 CAMP OF GENEBAL J. !J. PERSHXNG, AT THE FRONT, APRIL AEROPLANE TO COLONIA DUBLAN, AND BY RADIO TO COLUMBUS, N. M., APRIL caval- rymen encountered a fleeing force of Villa men early today and sounds of firing nave been heard from that direc- tion, but no report has been made to headquarters as to the results. The mountains of Gurrero are being combed thoroughly for Villa by the American forces, but nothing has been learned as to his whereabouts other than that captured bandits said he was be- iig carried further into the mountains in his jolting coach. General Pershing announced today that troops of the infan- try are to be used for mountain cliinbing, co-operating with the cavalrymen who have borne the brunt the five days' pursuit of Villa. Tho infantry men have been going through hardening preparation, in hill climbing marches for about two weeks and their officers say they are in excellent physical trim. The troops were closely behind Villa yesterday entering the village of shortly after he had fled from it. It was sus- pected that he might be hidden in one of its huts and every pre- caution was taken to effect the capture. Two squadrons of cav- airy entered the village from both sides simultaneously. There have been a number of minor skirmishes in the vieiinty of the village, two scouts reporting today that they encountered Villa men on its outskirts. They fought for five minutes ivithotit casualties. American air scouts are now flying over the entire Villa territory and carrying dispatches from the front to the field base and.field headquarters. Motor trucks also have been able to penetrate the mountain waste almost as far terri- tory occupied by the cavalry under Colonel George A. Dodd. IS SUNK Berlin, April 3. (By Wireless to ton Bussian transport with troops and war materials aboard, was sunk by a Turkish submarine March 30 the Turkish war office announced to- day. El Paso, Tex., April ports from Mexican sources in the interior received here today as- sorted Francisco Villa was head- ed towards Chihuahua City and that his emissaries Were attempt- ing to influence the garrison of the touTi to break from their alli- to the defacto'government. Xothing was said in the reports of Villa's alleged injuries, an omission which helped to confirm tie opinion already freely ex- pressed on the border that the bandit's wounds were an inven- tion of his own, reported with the intention of deceiving his pur- suers. i'lu-re is something of a mystery attached to the movement of Mex- it'an troops at points close to the border. It is known that large bodies of Cnrranza soldiers have been moved from eamps-in the in- terim to various places within 20 miles of the international line, but no explanation has been given of >e maneuvers beyond a general intimation that the defaeto gov- ernment is anticipating an attack by Hie followers of Diaz, who is ww considered the head of the feniricio party. 'hnnbiis, X. M., April initiiorities here today were to believe Colonel George L American cavalrymen (Continued On Page Eight) RUSSIANS HAVE DESIGN OF U, S. GUNS HE CLAIMS Washington, April tary Daniels before the house na- val -committee opposed any amendment to the armor plate jlant bill now before the commit- ;ee and opposed a plan to have the 'ederal trade commission deter- nine the cost of armor manufac- ure and with that figure as a jasis have the secretary fix the >rice of armor for ten years. If he private manufacturers failed to enter into a contract within thirty days after the price was ;ixed the government plant would SUBS ABE ACTIVE London, April in the list of steamers sunk Sunday are three British Teasels. The Ashbnrton, Goldmouth, and Achilles are the victims. The Ashburton, 4446 tons, was sunk by shrapnel shell, fired by a Ger- man submarine. Five members of the crew have been taken to a hospital. The crew of the Ooldmouth, tons, was saved, but two were injured. The captain and 62 others of the crew were saved when the liner Achilles went down. Four are musing. The Norwegian steamship Peter Mamre, tons, was sunk Sat- urday night while at anchor. One man, the sole survivor of the crew of fifteen, has been landed, ed. The British steamship Perth has been sunk. Several members of the crew were lost and eight were landed. The Perth was un- armed. The Norwegian steamer Ino, of 702 tons gross, has been sunk. There were no casualties. RAILROADS PROSPEROUS Washington, April perity of railroads throughout the country continues without abate- ment, reports the Interstate Com- merce Commission. Returns from 96 large roads show their net revenue increased from 300 in Feb., 3915, to for February, 1916, more than fifty percent. The greatest in- crease was in the eastern district and amounted to nearly 90 per- cent. ZEPPELINS VISIT GREAT BRITAIN GASOLINE PRICES TO SCOTLAND SUFFERS HEAVILY GO REFORECONGRESS Washington, April :ouches today were being put on ;ha preliminary report of the Fed- eral government's inquiry into the rise in the price of gasoline. It vill be placed before congress his week. The federal trade commission is had every available field agent at work on the investigation and the department of justice has OTwarded to the commission all iomplaints received by it. The [essential facts gathered, have been given to the department which will consider the evidence with a view to determining wheth- er prosecutions are warranted un- der the anti-trust law. be built. Representative Butler, republi- can, asked if it were not import- ant that navy secrets he kept con- fidential. "Of said Mr. Daniels. "Don't you know that the de- sign of our gnus lias been turned over to the Russian government during your de- manded Mr. Butler. I never heard of said the secretary. 1 think I can give you the his- tory of said Mr. Butler, but dropped the subject for the time. Later he asked the secretary to ask Admiral Strauz, chief of the bureau of ordnance, for a letter rilten by the admiral two years igo to the Krnpp factory in Gcr- mmy with regard to the navy 14- nch guns. Mr. Daniels agreed o do so. PLANNED TO KILL WIFE New York, April Ar- thur Waite, held in the Peck mtir- ler case, has revealed almost ev- ery detail of how he planned to nurder his father-in-law and his ejoung lady across I he her Irionds baby to ,lis nttor. someone on the hc intended also to kill wife, In remove the last ob- aelc between him and the I'eck I fortune. nuuu.'ullu Ull Llle IIIJI-I and she said, 0 no, '..is H llIS a c  low up British vessels. THROW MILK TO HOGS IN CLEVELAND SURPRISE ATTACK DEFEATS BRITISH Berlin, April surprise at- tack on British troops in Arabia caused them to retreat after they had suffered heavy losses, the war office announces. Toledo, 0., April city of Toledo at noon today applied for the appointment of a receiver for the Toledo Railway and Light Co. The application was filed fol- lowing a futile conference this morning of traction officials and representatives of the.Car Men's Union in an effort to settle the street car situation.. No street cars will be in operation until the court acts. This Cleveland, 0-, April land today faced a rnilk shortage while producers are fighting for higher prices. Producers are throwing great quantities of milk to the hogs rather than ship it to Cleveland at a loss. A demand for a price increase from 12 and 13 cents a gallon to 15 cents has been made. There will be an absolute em- bargo on shipments of milk to Cleveland unless the price is met, by the wholesalers, says a promi- nent producer. mm SIMS several days. may. require The dity's application is based on the ground that the company is not giving service; that the cit- izens arc handicapped and busi- ness seriously affected. General organizer Edward Mc- Jlorrow, of the Amalgamated As- sociation of Street Car .Employes said today that he was having dif- ficulty in keeping intcrurban car nen from striking in sympathy with Toledo car men. "I had n big delegation of in- :erurban car men to sec me }fes- Chicago, April Wheat prices made an unusually steep advance today and the market showed broad activity as a result of esti- mates that the crop of winter wheat in the United States this year would be bushels less than the yield harvested in 1915. Profit taking was heavy during; the advance but all the of- ferings were readily absorbed, with foreigners taking part in the buying. delivery showed tho jreatest upturn, touching 1 he said. "The men are jetting .restless. In Cincinnati Cleveland, Detroit nnd otherlto Vd, a jump of about five cents :ities they arc being hooted and a bushel above Saturday's finish. leered because they are carrying The close today was at' virtually jasseugcrs here, they told me." the topmost figure of the session. Paris, April new phase of the battle of Verdun haa begun and the belief prevails that tho violence if the hitest attacks foreshadows another attempt by the Germans to rush the fortress with vast forces, batteries of large calibre have i moved up closer to the French >ont and the German infantry has ccn rested and recognized. Yesterday's fighting on the whole as not unfavorable to the French, it is authoritatively stated. The ob- ject of the Germans was to clear the approach to Fort Douaumont and men were thrown forward on the mile and a half between Douau-; mont fort and the village of Yaux The attaching forces succeeded ii crossing a little ravine and in enter- the Caillette wood. Further east they dislodged the French from tho last ruined houses of the village oj Vnu-x, but the French positions were so placed as to make it impossibli (Continued On Page Eight) FROM SUNDAY NIGHT AIR RAID U. S. MARINES GO ASHORE Peking, April of the United States gunboat "Wil- mington went ashore today at Swatow, where the Chinese troops have declared their independence of the Central government. Amoy, April officials at Amoy have sent a request to the American consul asking that an American warship be sent to this port. Cincinnati, 0., April the request of the Kcv. Dr. J. Denver darling, of Columbus, resigned as secretary of the Ohio State Sunday School As- sociation, an investigation has been begun by a special commit- tee of ministers appointed by the Rev. Dr. C. E. Schenk, superin- tendent of the Cincinnati District Methodist Episcopal church, of rumors referring to the rcsigna- ion of Dr. Darling. Dr. Darling admitted that five letters were sent him apparently by young vonien. He said he has no idea vho were the authors. The let- ers, it was said, were found torn n the waste paper basket at Dr. darling's desk. "I have been waiting ever inee these facts became aid Dr. Schenk, today, "for ome one to make charges. Dur- that time 1 have received a arge number of anonymous com- nunications. 1 have received oth- inferentiai information, but here have been no formal barges. The investigation is akcn up now at the request of Jr. Darling himself." Of BIG PIOJ Washington, April quan- ;ity of correspondence belonging ;o Herr Von Der Goltz, the al- cgejl German spy, who has stud ic was tho directing head of the >lan to blow up the "Welland lanal, has been seized by Scotland rard detectives and will be made mblic shortly by the British for igii office. It is understood that the corres londence contains details of plans to blew up the Welland canal ant TOHEET of invasion ol United States. Canada from the ADOPT SIMPLIFIED WORDS Philadelphia, April pliiied spelling of twelve words recommended 'by the National Educational Asso- ciation was adopted today by the Philadelphia North Amer- ican. The words arc: Tho, altho, thru, thruout, thoro, thoroly, thorofare, program, prolog, catalog, pcdagog, and decalog. 25 HURT IN AN EXPLOSION Buffalo, N. Y., April Twenty-five men were injured, five probably fatally, 'in an explosion at the plant of the Otis Elevator company here today. The accident was at- tributed to the explosion of a gas tank in the foundry. MAY LAND PLUM Columbus, April Sil- laugh, republican, will be ap- >ointed. deputy superintendent of milding and loan associations, it s reported. Silbaugh, it is understood, will succeed James A. Devine, Demo- of Chillicothe, when his term as superintendent of the bureau expires. POLICE IN CLASH Washington, April clash ictwecn Ilaitiens and police in Northeast Haiti was reported to he navy department today by Capcrton. United States orces were not involved. LAKE EEIE OPEN Toledo, April on jfikc Erie between Toledo and Octroi! opened yesterday when he steamer Waukctn cleared port with a load of aatsssbilcs. 3. Presi- dent Wilson arid Majority Leader Kitchin of the house agreed general terms of anti "dumping" aud unfair' legislation to meet conditions after the war. The ways and means committee will 3iit them in the revenue bill which Mr. Kitchin toll the presi- dent would be ready for the house about April 20. The anti-dumping legislation will be along the general lines of eliminated from the present ariff law. On foreign goods to >e sold in the United States at ess than the market price in the country from which they are shipped, the new provision will impose an adidtional tariff to bring the selling price in the United States, up to what it would be if the goods were sold at the market price in the foreign coun- try. The unfair competition legis- lation would be along the same lines as the unfair competition sections of the law applying to un- fair competition in the United States. The President and Kitchin discussed protecting Mr. the newly grown dye stuff industry in the United States from compe- tition from abroad, but no con- clusion was reached. Mr. Kitchin said he expected an additional tariff on dye stuffs would be im- posed in the revenue bill but tho details had not been worked out. TO EXPOSE METHODS OF HIRING MURDERERS New York, April to methods of hiring murderers will be presented at tin; trials of the alleged slayers of Uiirnct Baff, a wholesale poultry denier, who bad irred the hostility of some of his tness rivals and was shot nnd tilled ase he left his store on the ight of Xor. 24, 1914. The authorities assort they can prove that was collected to iay for Buff's murder, and men wero selected for their ability to kill juickly mid efficiently. TO BE REPRIMANDED Snn Antonio, Tex., April nnnt .John K. Mort, was tried court-innrtinl on (.-barges of lead- ng a detachment of soldiers into Mexico, to recover two American loldicrs detained by has jcen found guilty and sentenced to je reprimanded. FOUR CANDIDATES Helena, Mont., April vill be but four names of cnndi- late-s on the Montana presidential irimary ticket, April 21. ,ime of filing expired today. The The i.indidatcs are President Wilson, )cmocrat; Senator A. B. Cum- ins of Town, and Edward R. Wood, of Philadelphia, Hcptibli- ians, and A. L. Benson of New fork, Socialist. London, April per- sons were killed and eleven injur- ed in Scotland in Sunday night's Zeppelin raid, it was officially an- nounced this afternoon. There were no'casualties in England. The Zeppelins which visited the east coast of Scotland Sunday night hung over the district for 45 minutes during which time twenty bombs were dropped. A Zeppelin which appeared over northern county in England, yesterday remained about an hour and a half, dropping 20 bombs over a considerable area, largely agricultural. With the exception of the big air raid of January 31, when the casualties were 67 persons and 117 njnred, the Zeppelin raids of Fri- day and Saturday nights caused greater loss of life than any pre- vious aerial attack this year. The total casualties of the two nights, according to an offiical report, were 59 persons killed, and. 166 wounded. .3. (Wireless to official German Berlin, April account of Saturday night's Zep pelin raid over England follows: "During the night of April 1-2, naval airships renewed the attack on the east eoast of England. For a period of one aud one half hours explosive .and incendiary bombs were thrown on blast large iron works and industrial (Continued On Page Eight- Speakin' oj th' high cost o' gas- cne; I'm wonderin' what has be- come o' that eminent young doe- :or somebody from our own dear Ohio, who accordin', t' th' news- >apers and magazines. a few months ago, bad discovered a process o' m'akin" gasolene so cheaply that it could- sell for .a cent or so a gallon? If I thought John D. has gone and bought up ;hat discovery and suppressed it I'd have him arrested. But then L reckon ther'd be no nanago t' git out of it some way. Here's for tomorrow: in north portion and probably-rain in south por- tion tonight and Tuesday. in west por- tion, probably rain in east portion tonight. Tuesday fair. West rain tonight ahd Tuesday.   

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