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Portsmouth Valley Sentinel Newspaper Archive: September 8, 1915 - Page 1

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Publication: Portsmouth Valley Sentinel

Location: Portsmouth, Ohio

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   Valley Sentinel, The (Newspaper) - September 8, 1915, Portsmouth, Ohio                               OCTOBER 6-7-8-9 THE VALLEY SENTINEL OCTOBER 6-7-8-9 VOLUME 53. (Associated Pros Leued Win) PORTSMOUTH, OHIO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1915. (Associated Press Leased Wire) NUMBER 97. SAY; II. S.TO HUT FIE DETAILS Wc-shington, Sept. sanding officers of the sunken liner Hesperian in a joint affi- davit forwarded to the state de- jartment declared that from the fragments of steel which fell on jhe deck it was "indubitably" shown that the ship was struck y a torpedo. Washington, Sept. official dispatches still left in iioiibt whether the Allan liner Hes- iperian was'sunk by a torpedo or la mine. The state department and the White House continued to delay any action or decision. Secretary Lansing said his re- rporls failed to establish exactly -how the ship was destroyed. One 'dispatch from Consul Frost refer- red to the Hesperian as having sunk where she.was torpedoed. Ambassador Page transmitted 'in- formation he had received, from the British admiralty -which dis- claimed that .the ship had been used in military service at sll since the beginning of the war. The official disposition is to give full opportunity for receipt of (Continued On Page Six) IB Says Sdeatfei Cleveland, Sept. inine personality does not ex- ist in is the belief of Mrs. D. D. Butcher, teacher of "individual sci- which aims at the perfection of true mating, Mrs. Butcher says: "Woman goes to Heaven after death, but becomes a part of man. "The theory involved in individual science is that the sun, as male, is the true mate of the earth, as female. The earth is the producer. With- out the sun there would be no progeny. "On earth men and women must become perfect before perfection of spiritual body can be attained. "Woman was created in Adam and in the reflection of him. Man and woman unite in forming the spiritual body. They retain their identity but remain as one." GOLD HAY I TA D K New York, Sept. tional bankers did not altogether relish today the news from Port- land, Maine that more than in gold "coinwas speeding to New York to holster Great Britain's credits in this country. This is believed is the largest sin- gle gold shipment ever made here by a foreign power. It comes, it vns said, at a time when gold is wanted less than ever before in the, history of the country. Bringing this mountain of gold to New York at a time when nor- mal demands of business are low- er than usual and when the vaults of the country are already chok- ing with gold, may, it is feared, accelerate the tendency toward inflation and speculation. Already according to the .weekly state- ment of the Federal reserve board of September 3, the gold reserve in national banks has reached the' total of FOUR PERISH IN KANSAS FLOOC lola. Kas., Sept. Mis- souri, Kimsas. and Texas railway n man were'washed from a i-iir near here and twelve s wore missing in this city following n flood that rais- nn ;i six inch rainfall last Kvery available man was g today trying to rescue marooned in the lower sec- tions of the city where people could be seen crouched upon housetops that arc barely out oC the water. Few boats were avail- able and rafts could not make much progress in the strong cur- rent. Elm creek was full of driftwood and debris. The smelters in East lola wore flooded, and it was im- possible to estimate the damage. I'm Plot Says Mrs. Mohr; Holds Irlo Conspired To Rob Husband Arid Accuse Hei nil Top to bottom, left: George W. Healis, Victor Brown and Henry Spellmani Mrs Moor, Dr residence The defense of Mrs Tiffany Blair Alohr of Providence, R. I., to the charge that JH-ajealona rage "hi! pltfrted the death of her husband, -will be tint both Dr. C.- Franklin Mohr and herself were victims of a She say that the three negroes who-blled Moh'r-HGeorge ,W. Hoalls Victor Brown and Henry. Spell-' to rob her liasband and then blame her to.escape punishment REPUBLICAN PLUMS MAY HAVE BITTER TASTE AS SALARY MAY BE LACKING Columbus, Sept. cans not on the civil service eligible list who have been put in state .jobs made vacant by the ousting of Democrats appointed under non-competitive civil ser- vice examinations, will draw no pay unless Attornc.y General Tur- ner tells Auditor of State Dona- aey to give them their salaries. The today in seven questions sent to 'Mr. Turner ask- what he should- do about the pay of these appointees made it No. 24-the Human Question Mark li-ro'-, another pest we all deeply sorry for for it dc'serves every atom of sym- pathy it can get. Von sen and have dealings with it lininst every day, and in almost ry walk of life. And some of ;irr- considered successes in they are as far as that but they arc pests ''fthclt'ss for apparently they nothing, and instead of themselves depend Mjnicone else to tell them 'filling that has happened. "x'-d are they to asking ques- that when they make a posi- M.iti-ment they are forced to on the end of it a question liuring the coming winter strike this pest. Perhaps j "ill be hustling to work all up to your ears to keep and snow out. of them ;ni> pf-st will stop-you. If you von to listening to what s filing to sny, thinking tlmt it vast importance. And for it knows not what it does, and it's to be pitied deeply. Just about as much sense as you will find in the above question yon will find in every remark this pest taki ill probably come through intakes. "Don't you think it's cold It walks around with 3-011 by the y'" hour, and never makes any state- i'-n is the time you feel like nient without turning it into a ng a punch at it, but don't.question, if it were to-seoji, horse drop dead in the streets or some other thing that positively could not be disputed this pest would ask you if the horse didn't fall down. I'm not going to think up any punishment for this pest, for that, will come when everyone finds them out and runs when they sec plain'that he. would not approve their salary vouchers unless as- sured by the attorney general that, this would be legal. The attor- ney general's answer is expected before September 15, of the next pay day. "What I want to said Auditor Donahey, "is whether it is legal to approve persons Im- positions gathered up from the street and who have not been cer- tified under any civil service and who have been put in places held by ousted persons appointed uii- (Continued On Page 6; IS FIERCE Paris, Sept. night saw a continuance of the violent artil- lery charges along the French line according to the official commun- ication given out by the war office this afternoon. The fighting took place around Sonchex and near Neuville and it was particularly severe in the region of Roye on the plateau of Queencviervcs and near Donvron. IS FELT IN New York, Sept. Cen- tral and South American Tele- graph company today reports that earthquakes lutd interrupted their cable lines between Snn Jlliiri del Hur, Costa Itica anil Salinas Cruz. Their report states that the shocks were very heavy in Costa liica but there are no indications of loss of life in their advices. Czar Will Lead Russian Forces For Last Stand Here's Old Chicago, Sept. ache 1 Find a number of snails without shells. From each head remove a small stoneliko substance the size of your, thumbnail and wear these stones about your neck. 'Make a poultice of the bodies of small snails and apply locally. Or apply the brain of a vulture local- ly and wear a bone from his skull about your neck. These were the methods employed by the practical school of medicine of New Testament times, according to Professor Shirley Jack- son Case, of the University of Chicago Divinity School, who talked on "Mental Healing in New Testament Times." II Brownsville, Texas, Sept. Deputy sheriffs- and Mexicans fought across the Rio Grande for a few minutes late yesterday near Mission, Texas. Some of the Mex- icans are believed to. have been hit. Paris, Sept. French steamship Bordeaux has been tor- pedoed and sunk twelve miles outside the mouth of the Giron- dean off the western const of France, crew was taken aboard pilot boat. INDIANAPOLIS MAYOR TO GO ON TRIAL Indianapolis. Ind., Sept. Mayor Joseph K. Bell, of this city was to be 'placed on trial before Special Judge W. H. Eichhorn, in criminal court here today, charged with conspiracy to commit felon- ies in connection with tho pri- mary of May 5, 1914, and the elec- tion of November 3, 1014. A special venire of 200 has been summoned which it was said a jury would be selected. It is possible that several days may be consumed in choosing a jury. TWO KILLED BOATERS IN PERIL Toledo, Sept. power and sail boats arc in trouble some- where on Lake Erie. In the group of pleasure craft overtaken by the northeaster that set .in Sun- day were four power craft and one sail boat whose occupants took shelter on Turtle Island, now uninhabited and were without food until this morning when they Were brought in by a party pLrescuejs.. ......._. i Columbus, Sept. 7. Massey Golden, H7. of lieese Station, was killcd'outright and John Albright, 40, also of Reese Station, was so badly injured that, he died later at ft' hospital, as the result of a head-on collision in a fog of a freight car and a shop car of the Scioto Valley Traction line early today nt Reese Station, seven miles south of here. Scioto Val- ley officials said the wreck was due to confusion in. the dispatch- er's orders and that, an investiga- tion would be made. London, Sept. News says that the Harrison Line steam- ship Dictator was sunk several days ago and her crew of -1'2 was luiided without casualties. There js.no -confirmatiou-of this report. Congers, X. V, Sept. Windier and his bride of a few days-were instantly killed and three men and a women were ser- iously injured in an automobile accident near here curly today. The injured are Miss Louise Ben- son of Jlavcr.-itniw, .1 nines Brophy of Havnretraw, Robert Brophy and William. Curran, tho chauf- feur. ..........-i, Paris, Sept. a message to President Poincaire, Emperor Kxinhs aTmncTKM that he las ptaoed Immrif ig command of all the Banian annira. The message was sent from Tssrtroye-Sele, the emperor's na- dence near Petrograd, under date of September 6. It follows: "In placing myself today at the bead of my valiant armies, I have in my heart, Monsieur President, the most sincere withes for the greatness of France and the victory of her heroic army. "NICHOLAS." President Poincaire sent the following response today: "I know that your majesty in taking command of your heroic army intends to continue energetically until final victory, the war which has been imposed upon the allied nations. I address to your majesty in the name of France my most cordial wishes.'' "RAYMOND POINOAIEE" London, Sept. imme- diate objective of the Austro- German campaign becomes clearer with the growing indications that the invaders need the Baltic port of Riga, not only as a base to prevent operations in tho direc- tion of hut as winter quarters in case the attempt: to reach the Russian capital should be postponed until next spring. Field Marshal von Hindenburg is experiencing groat difficulty in bridging the portions of the Dvina held by the Germans. The current of the river is too swift for .the. construction of pontoon bridges under the Russian artillery fire., As the rainy season comes on it will be more difficult for the in- vaders to bring up supplies for their advance forces and eonsc- f quently the seizure of Riga as a (Continued On Page Six) PK AS DEFEAT IS HEAID Berlin, Sept. The Overseas News Agcnc.y says that a panic was caused in Petro- grod, yesterday .by rumors that the Russian Baltic port of Riga had ,bcen captured., 1' The Lokal Anzeiger pub- lishes private says the news agency, "stating that the Russian capital was thrown into confusion by reports that the positions on the Dvina- line bad been captured, that Russian armies had been Riga had been, taken and that the German advance upon the capital would be lio longer hampered. Immense crowds gathered in front of newspaper offices. There was great excitement'and arrests were made. "Toward evening -'-the news- papers published extra editions containing official denials of these minors and saying that the Rus- sian defensive positions were still intact. However, the spread of panic at the capital and reports of Nicholas' trip to the front are only a pretense to veil the removal of the .emperor's res- idence to the interior." FEIUISUBHARINE U-27 is BIND. Berlin, Sept. London! admiralty announced todaj thnt the German submarine U-27 sank a small British cruiser sev eral weeks ago. The U-27 has not been heard from since and the ad miralty says it probably is lost. The submarine.U-27 had nol figured conspicuously in the rec- ords of German naval operation. She was built in 1312-13 at the same time-as the these craft displacing 840 tons, and was on. of the speediest of the U boats constructed lip to 1914, being capable of ranking 17 knots above water and 12 knots when sub- merged. She was equipped with three torpedo tubes. Her comple- ment ia not shown in recent naval lists. Peoria, Ills., Sept. .uneral of George Fitch, widely known as a humorist and author, who died at Berkeley, California iiignst 9, was held at Galva, Illi- his birthplace, near here to- day. Journalists from all parts of the country attended. As a mark of esteem a thous- nd children in the public schools f Peoria, at the hour of Mr. itch's funeral read works from is pen. Mr. Fitch retired from tho pres- idency of the American Humorist Association in 1911. Steubenvillc, Ohio, Sept. An order for more than 400 glass house tank blocks to be shipped to Japan has been received by a local cliiy company. The order is said to be the largest of its kind ever given States, ROYAL DAUGHTER DIES. London, Sept. Adal- bert, wife of the third son the German emperor, gave birth to a daughter, Saturday. The child died soon after its birth. The condition of the princess is re- ported to be satisfactory. Besides hein' a weather man I find myself for th' sake o' bein' congenial compelled t' be a lot o' other things: A few weeks ago was a soldier and had th' time o' my life. This week I'm a fire- man and repeatin' th' perform- ance. I've gotta spread myself :his week 'cause I've gotta deal on with Chief McOuat t' put on a special brand o' weather for th' Firemen's meet and I've gotts make good or bust a button.. Here's for tomorrow: cloudy with show- ers tonight and probably Wed- nesday; not much change in tern-' perature. Kentucky Thnnderahowers' this afternoon or tonight; Wed- nesday partly cloudy. West cloudy tonight and Wednesday, showers Wednesday.   

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