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Portsmouth Times Newspaper Archive: June 7, 1961 - Page 1

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Publication: Portsmouth Times

Location: Portsmouth, Ohio

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   Portsmouth Times (Newspaper) - June 7, 1961, Portsmouth, Ohio                                Hot V Humid OWiefil observer's temperature re- port: TtxJiy II j m. H, lotty'i mini. mum mm- mur. 81, Vtkr ajo; Maximum 77, mir-iccum 32. OfcjJ Valley: clotdi- warm and t.uiuid in- crfarifif lerifht Tfcursdjj. Low tor-JfM ii Ws. VOLUME 111, No. For 709 Vciirit A Dcptmlnllc Portsmouth Institution Home Edition Covering Southern Ohio And Northern Kentucky PHONE: KLrmvood 3-3101 PORTSMOUTH, OHIO. WEDNESDAY, JUNK Two SecBwi 26 PAGES 7c 420 Kennedy Says Chances Of War Les s Since Talks By LEWIS GL'IJCK WASHINGTON'  ity Ready Bills Get Tly-In' il Fines By DUANE E. If Times Staff Disturbed i COLUMBUS. Ohio Two esigned to open new sources THE ASSOCIATED PRESS revenue to Ohio cities and in Jackson, Miss., today were given the ax Tuesday Mississipi's first "Free- noon by the House Taxation Fly-in" while the jails filled mittee after foes presented ''Freedom Riders" and more arguments against expected. Indefinitely postponed by matter how they come, if mous vote was a proposal to alow municipalities to levy are found guilty of disturb-ng the peace, they can expect to 3 per cent on jail sentences and fines. iliry bills. Similarly killed by 12-2 spokesman for the Congress on Racial Equality (CORE) an- was a bill to allow munici-ulities to levy motor vehicle fees :p to S5 a year in addition to the icense plates fees charged in St. Louis that three S'egroes would fly from there to 'ackson today to test segregation iclicies. le state. Basic objection of the opponents, including D. L. Buchanan the Stark County Tax League, was that the bills would tpset le long-standing pre-emption doctrine under which the state and its local subdivisions R. Oldham. national chairman of CORE, said the of the trip was test terminal facilities at Jack-wn to see whether interstate travelers are afforded the same accommodations as everyone else." arrcd from levying duplicate taxes on the same Washington, a CORE spokesman sard seven Negro and two Spokesmen for several public utility companies argued their rms already pay more students from that area would fly to Ncvr Orleans today and within a few days take a bus leir share of taxes in Ohio Jackson and join the move- would be faced with alon; with other Freedom ligh costs in collecting the loca utility Freedom Riders took a These arguments were present ed in rebuttal to the point from New Orleans to Jackson Tuesday and quickly landed he previous week by supporters of the bills, including Rep. jail after conviction of breach of peace charges in the Missis- miad G. James, R-N'oble, capital city. sponsor, and John P. group of five whites and executive director of the Negroes boosted to 72 the to- Municipal League. (Turn to Page S. Column Lewis Denies Two Enter Pleas To Two out of three pcrwrj in- G. Littleton as his defense dictcd by the Jur.c session of the Scio'.o County grand jury entcreJ PI 4 0 n g not guilty to pleas ol not guilty on charge of auto larceny. Kenneth today before Common Allen. IS. of 13U High St., ras Court J-jdge Lowell .ader a bond for trial The third person, Beral Dty police charged that Alter 38, of Luosvifle, was not reportedly look a car beionga, to entei a flea and was corn to Orville Stockham, 2120 23rd SI. ted to the Lima Stale Hospital 'o rj-wmtfinn May 13. Record Made Wilh 2 Accepted1 For Military Academy A class of 217 Portsmouth High School seniors with 11 "spec! sis" added is to be graduated in commencement "exercises scheduled for Thursday at S p.m. at Municipal Stadium. In case o! inclement weather the ceremon} will be held at Grant Junior High gym. Rcv( Roland G. Carter of Gen tral Methodist Church. Spring ield. is to deliver the commence- ment address. Edward H. Foumier. principa at PHS. will present the class aw Mrs. Glenn Brock, president o the board of education, is award the diplomas. Music for the program, to be presented by the PHS corner band, r.ill include the procession al "Pomp and select-Otis from 'The Sound c Music" ind the main theme from Rev. H. Wiley Ralph of A' Saints Episcopal Church will olfe the invocation and Rev. Lconar Uhrich of Calvary Baptist Church will ask the benediction. Many of the graduating have achieved unusual rcco.-ds including the. 1561 class AA ba: state championship, i seniors played a ma jo jiars" imprisoBrntr.t. One ci tw-c companion bills, hit- V.f.g at numbers game operators, has been approved by both houses a Clyde E, Uwis, 30. of Whcelers- btrg. entered a plea of rot guilty Allen told the court that he i riihout funds and requested signed' by the governor. at K.OOO. third antipmbling bill, which to the charge of assault with court-appointed attorney. dangerous weapon and Ks bond Thompson c-rdercd Bjra Fraiey, charged with strik'n its threaten- Lawrence Sheriff Floyd hoe May 10. held for (h tn was in- servallon th.e Lima hospital a the Sim- ter learning Mr. Fraiey had bee Tuesday night and may ccme toLtrjnz store in South Webber. released from the Cdumbu, (Turn to Page 13, Cdum-i 3) I Uwis is to havt Atty. ErctstjState Hospital in 1559. hich le. Robert McDowell twice scorn rst in the state regardless assilkation. in m a t h e matics nd had a perfect score of SOO ie college board ma thematic section. Paul Weaver, senior class pres- lent, recently was accepted f arking the second PHS graduate o win appointment to a service .cadcmy. The announcement of the joinlmcnt was made by Rep. H. Harshi Jr. who in- Foreign Aid Classed Best Anti-Communist Weapon OfSuppor By ERNEST B. VACCARO WASHINGTON (AP) Secre- >ry of State Dean Rusk, backed y President Kennedy's appeal to te American people to suport his foreign aid program, makes sponsibilities, however burden- some they may the Presi- dent said. "I know that foreign aid is a burden that is keenly ftlt and I can only say that we have no his second piea.today for con- more crucial obligation abroad.' (ressional approval of the H.S- xllion measure. Reporting to the nation Tucs- Rusk before the House Foreign Affairs Ctwimiltee id fol- low up his apeal of last week eader. that "difficult and grim times" confront this country and require "patience and determina- tion." Mansfield expressed his views after a White House brief' ing ol congressional leaders. Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey. 0- assistant said, "We must lay night on his conferences to the Senate Foreign Relations broad. Kennedy said cconomic'Committec. The Senate group Heller Relations Expcclcd After Uejiort To People JACK BEU. WASHINGTON (AP) Presi- dent Kennedy's crisp description .lfe.UM.ur a It lUUVil of the Weak realities of a divided t be prepared lo a long and continum? pcnod ofjwar w.on (od ffom racm. tension, and danger. of One provision of the foreign aid id programs are vitally impor- continued its public hearings on prCV1S'0r; ant in resisb'ng Lhe spread of the big military and economic as- nmmnnTtm mcnts ln underdeveloi "There is no use talking against he Communist advance unless sistance program. Rusk's appearance follows an assertion by Sen. Mike Mansfield are willing to meet our re-fof Montana, Senate Democratic Dravo Bid Low Gates Of New Dam To Be In Operation Soon Partial operation of the new- Ohio River dam at Franklin Fur- nace i; scheduled in about two weeks. At that time. Dam 30. just moval of two Ohio River dims and locks and one on Big Sandy River. tries Following a nationally televised report lo the people Tuesday oped on his European (rip. the against losses from any young President rode a crest of -ran into opposition in the bipartisan support for the hard below-Grcenup. will founder pool I Dravo Thc Em.crlv water. Huntington District US. Imcnt estimate was with- Corps of Engineers announccd'out profit. An earlier cstim. was Senate commit Ice. Frank M. Coffin, managing-di- rector of the Development Loan Fund insisted such guarantees would be used only in rare cases to help assure Financing for top priority contracts. But Sen. Albert Gore, D-Tenn., said he would opose it as "a complete blank check for unbri- dled discretion." Coffin said that in no case would the government absorb any more than 50 to 75 per cent of such losses. Tuesday. The engineers said four of the nine gales arc in the process of being painted and should be opcr- ationa' by June M. When lowered into position to form part of the dam. the lower pod at Dam 30 will 'oi increased to 15.4 feet. This also will give but one pool between the new darn and Dam 29 at Aihland THE ENGINEERS also an- nounced late Tuesday that Dravo Corp. ci Pittsburgh. Pa., was ip- parent low bidder when bids were opened during the day for re- Dravo also constructed the lirst stage cofferdam and was a sub- contractor on the conslruction of guide and guard wills for the new locks. IN' RELEASING a schedule of final work, engineers said the pool will be raised an additional eight feet about July 1. This will elimi- nate the Dam 29 pool and provide a 20-iriIe poo! from Grcenup to Dam 28 in West Huntington. The Franklin Furnace Locks and Dam, scheduled for com- 'atejCastro Cable Is Studied By Committee DETROIT (APJ-Lcsdcrs of a citizcns: movement today studied a cable from Prime Minister scribed Kennedy's report as an "objective appraisal'' and added. (Turn lo Page 9. Column 3) Benefit (Turn to Page 13. Column 1) Horse Show Scheduled June 22-25 asks he said lie ahead of the West to win an ideological bat- tle with communism. There was general recognition among Republicans and Demo- crats that nothing really had been accomplished in Kennedy's infor- mal talks with Soviet Premier vhrushchcv in Vienna except to wt the participants in a position :o deal with each other on a first- land basis. Promise Is A Gain But even this was recorded as a gain, along uith the yet un- filled promise of the Soviet lead- er lo work toward the establish- ment of a truly neutral govern- ment in Laos. There was no determining, at the moment, the eventual con- gressional reaction to Kennedy's appeal to the American people f> support his nca- concept of for- eign aid. In Anaheim. Calif., former Vice (President Richard M. Nixon de- del Castro giving his latest condi- tions for further negotiation! on swapping 1.200 Cuban invasion prisoners for 500 American trac- tors. Castro indicated he still stood by an offer he first made May 17 for such a deal. But his cable- described as verbose as his on details Before replying to Castro. Wal- ter P. Reuthcr. i cochairman of Tractors for Freedom. Inc.. corv fcrred here with Joseph M. Dodge. a Detroit banker oho is treasurer of the group. The conference was mined to maintain its prcscr.cc 'delayed until Castro's reply could and access lo West Berlin "at any be translated from Spanish. Iri.'k." Reuther arj Dodge also set up, other danger "He came back with a deep real- ization of the problems with which we arc confronted." Sen. Lcvcrett Sallcnstall of Massachusetts, chairman of the conference of Republican sena- tors, said that Kennedy had dramatized the responsibility the United States bears to people in developing nations "if we wa-t to build them up in the love of free- vYest To Slay Kennedy raid t5e West is defer- The arnual Forlsmou'V fralc the championsh.p Charity Horse is lo be prc- stake events. -u. vert, ar.r.uatly sponsored American jjcr.qwith Reuthcr whs lion on the part of all of cs." Portsmouth General Saddle Pleasure Horse Class. d the United Auto: Sen. J. William Fuarijht. (D- for the evert, ar. by the Ports Ipital Women's Auxiliary as a bcn-j This is a ww class in the L'.; efit for the hospital. this year, and it will determine! Castra-s chairman of the to Relations Conmittee, This year's edition of the Char- [the state's American sad negotiations annouwcd on'said should minimize the ity Horse is to share the die pleasure horse champion. Havana radio 12 hours s we win face in tie deadline given byjcon-.'ng months." _ committee. The committeei evcnfs I960 record for the nura-1 There is to be only one after- bcr c! classes to be presented noon performance in the and for the sire of the official! that scheduled to begin al Un3 d trjc-i prize list. 1p.m. Thursday. June 22. The rc-'lors it would make available but' f'WIUU Fifty-nine classes ire scheduled j r.ainirg four performances are My: -Q-jr committee car.not pro-; for prescr.Ution in the for pm. Thurs- ur.til we have received Pcrtirsetth ir.g show. offical prize list day. Friday. Saturday and Sin-'cial confirmation directly from plate. day. Jur.c 22-25. [your that your offer Death sho-T is to be preserved Ralph A. S'evfr.s is Rtn-'still :Editorial Page in five performances. TwelvCjtral fnr the show.i Cubsr. government, in ihejMarkets CRAIG BRANT Gcti Academy Appoisteecl classes arc schcd-.led for D. Selby the sh-w annou-ccrr.cr.t. thanked the Sport' irmjnces'ajcr, aM Mrs. W. E. Pierce, the [commit tee for its humanitarian of the first four perfor aud 11 are set for fe co'orfJ shw secretary. Television and Raio Wofr.ea't New i 4 15 12 S 12 1M3 7) 15-11   

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