Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Portsmouth Times Newspaper Archive: January 15, 1959 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Portsmouth Times

Location: Portsmouth, Ohio

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Portsmouth Times (Newspaper) - January 15, 1959, Portsmouth, Ohio                                Weather Ohio Valley: Mostly cloudy and much colder chance of snow flur- ries tonlulit and Friday. Low tonight in 20s. Hlfjh Friday 30. Official observer's temperature re- port: Today 11 40, today's mini- mum 38, yesterany'fi maximum 56, Year ago: Maximum 47. minimum 33. VOLUME 107, No, 235 PHONE: ELmwood 3-3101 Home Edition Covering Southern Ohio And Northern Kentucky For 106 Years A Dependable Portsmouth Institution PORTSMOUTH, OHIO, THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1959 Two SecBoni 36 PAGES Section J Toll Mounts To 195 InCubanExecutions WORKMAN DWARFED. An employe of Goodyear Aircraft Corp. in Akron is dwarfed by a fiberglass rndome which the cteuns is the world's largest. The huge laminatcd_jlastic_ structure moas urcs 63 feet in diameter and is more than seven stones high. A g a.. radome such as this can be erected or dis-assembled m approximately 80 hours using a six-man crew. (DPI New Boston Sets Figures For Budget For Operating; Tax Rate To Be S'17.10 Lively Assembly Session New Boston City Council passed legislation Wednesday night ap- proving a tax rate for 1959 and appropriating for city operations. The tax rate, lowest of the Sci- oto County subdivisions, war. fig- ured earlier by the county budget commission. The appropriations from lS58's Mayor Vernal G. RifTe Sr. said the 1339 sum's only difference will be in the purchase of three new trucks. One will be a pickup ve- hicle for the fire department, the others of different design for use in street repair and maintenance, he said. The 1959 General Fund calls for outlay or The fig-ore differ little By ART PARKS COLUMBUS, Ohio lawmakers have decided to set a March 5 deadline on the intro- duction of bills in this session. That's seven weeks from today. By the time that date rolls around, possibly proposed laws could be before the Senate and House. As the Legislature wound up its second straight short work week Wednesday, the total of bills in- troduced reached 71. It is likely that hearings on these It is liKeiy uiai pep. mcliara o. weu.au. and-othcr bills will get under wavjFrankijn) wants to establish und- the week be-ginning Jan. 25. _ slate iaw an offense of aggra- vated assault carrying a one-to Bills already in the hopper in dicate a session of lively contro- P.BV. B. A. Broughton (R- Geauga) proposes to prohibit pub- lic school teachers from wearing General for 1953 was Broken down, the new Fund allows these sums: For general administration, 134- police department, fire department, safety fund, fl.100; health department. 840- service supervision, 014- city building, street cleaning. street lighting, waste removal and dis- posal. sewer maintenance, sewage treatment plant op- eration, water service, 200' recreation. The following table compares certain appropriations of 1958 and 1959: Flood defense Street Improvement Bond retirement Street rcpair Relief 1D39 159.2D2 159.29? 85.070 21.600 In other action. Council passec legislation authorizing 100 per cent payment of the relief director's salary from the Relief Fund ef- fective today. The sum amounts to per month. March 5 Deadline Set For New Bills ployed in public schools could wear the garb of their order in classrooms. The ruling drew a number of protests from Protest- ant groups. Rep. William C. Games (R-Ad ams) and three co-sponsors pro- pose to require school boards to notify non-teaching employes their salary contract for the com- Barrett (D-Ma- honing) proposes to repeal the law which permits local option elections on the sale, of 3.2 beer. Richard B. Metcalf (R- vaictl aoaauik five-year penalty. Metcalf also wants to establish severe penal- ties for assault on a child under i Former Ally. Gen. William. Saxbc before the election that Catholic November nuns em- 16. Rep. Ethel G. Swanbeck (R- is garb in the classroom. 1o make it illegal to km or wound another person's (Turn to BILLS, Page 24) Opposes Ohio To Negotiate Land For Roads, DiSalle Says S, Ohio quoting his new high- DiSalle today reiterat- a law. cd opposition to capital punish- ment but said he would not inter- fere with administration of the I have always been opposed to the governor told newsmen, "but I aim not going to judgment for a court of law." DiSalle explained that appeals for clemency by condemned pri- soners would be considered in the regular manner, without regard to personal feelings. "As long as the law is on the books, the way it is, that per month. books, the way it is, that is the Heretofore. 75 per cent of the way we are going to administer ,nncv had been paid from the Re- Said. rnoney had been lief Fund and the the General Fund. the Re balance from IC The change will allow the city to draw additional money from the state, which pays half the amount of salaries in the relief depart- ment, city officials said. Up until now. the state has been paying only half of the 75 per cent coming from the relief monies. 16 Indicted In Pike County Two Men Charged With Manslaughter WAVERLY, Ohio Sixteen in- dictments were returned Wednes- day by January term of the Pike County grand jury. Among the open indictments were two for manslaughter. The jury, in making its annual Jail inspection, recommended the jail portion of the county installa- tion be razed "and if necessary a bond issue be voted to furnish funds with which to construct a new jail in keeping with modern standards and conditions." Nineteen cases were reviewed by the jury with 10 secret and six- open counts returned. Three cases were ignored. Odd Woodruff. 44, of Piketon Bt. 2, was indicted for first de- gree manslaughter. The indictment arose from the pistol slaying of Guy Clark. 50, a neighbor, Oct.. 21, DiSalle said. He told a news conference that he will talk with legislative lead- ers about introduction of a bill to abolish capital punishment in Ohio. DiSalle confirmed reports from (Turn to GRAND JURY, Page 24; Theaters saying that he will replacs depart ment task forces with new groups. That means, DiSalle added, that "we will return to the policy of negotiating for right-of-way land for highway projects." He said the take-it-or-leave-it or "one price' policy of the previous administra- tion will be abandoned. The governor added that Pres- ton expects to make an over-all reduction in the number of high- way employes. DiSalle's Ax Falls On 'Surplus' State Workers COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) The ax has fallen on what Gov. Mi- chael V. DiSalle considers surplus Insane Plea Entered For Stockham 'Not GuHty' Says Counsel In Two Separate Pleadings An insanity plea was entered in Common Pleas Court today for Charles A. Stockham, 35-year-old chiropractor charged with first-de- gree murder for the' death of his mother. Stockham's attorney, Edgar H. Hale, entered two separate pleas for his client one of not guilty and one of not guilty by reason of insanity. Stockham was one of 10 per- sons arraigned before Judge Ver- non Smith on indictments returned Tuesday by Scioto County grand jury. Stockham is charged with fatally strangling his mother, Lucy Pearl Stockham, during an argument at their Slocum Station home the night of Dec. 13. Mr, Hale told a reporter the in- sanity plea is based on the report of a local psychologist who ex- amimid Stockham recently at the MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AT') jscioto County Jail. The attorney U S District Judge Frank M. John- did Ilot elaborate on the report son' Jr today ordered Circuit or disclose the name of the psy- Judge George C. Wallace cited for gaid he to obtain criminal contempt of court, for failure to comply with an order to produce voter registration records to the Civil Rights Commission. Justice Department attorneys were directed by Johnson to insti- tute contempt proceedings as soon action came after the commission reported it was able to inspect registration records in Barbour and Bullock counties de- spite what it called "dilatory tactics used by Wallace in turning the records over to grand juries in the two counties instead of to the commission. The federal judge ruled that al- though the purpose of his order to Wallace to produce the records was carried out when the grand juries allowed federal agents to look at them, the 32-year-old Ala- bama judge nevertheless must answer for his defiant action. Grand juries of Barbour and Bullock counties which Wallace lurriedly empaneled this week and to which h'e gave the records the files available for in- spection. Wallace told the jurors they could do what they wanted to with the records. Commission agents were said Wednesday night to have finished checking the files for evidence of discrimination against prospective Judge Faces U.S. Citation For Contempt Court Order Comes After Inspection Of County Vote Records ;Shoot All MEMORABLE SERMON. Right Rev. Arthur Carl Lichtenbcrgcr delivers a sermon from the Canterbury pulpit in Washington. DC., after ceremonies installing him as the presiding bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States. More than 3.000 persons attended the ceremonies at Washington National Cathedral. (UPI Telephoto.) (Story on Page De Gaulle's Pledge a psychiatrist to examine Stock Negro voters in counties. Bank Votes To Double Capital Trust Department Will Be Added Approval of a two-for-one stock split, increasing the capital of Portsmouth Banking Co. from (Turn to DiSALLE, Page 24) uw f Wednesday at an annual share- holders meeting. Reported Subpoenaed Cleveland Union Chiefs To Face Federal Probe CLEVELAND than j be a grand jury investigation in v u labor leaden of Cleveland Teamsters Union and other labor leaders re- portedly have been subpoenaed for a federal grand jury investi- gation which opens here Monday Federal authorities have been working quietly on the probe, and it was through those who have been subpoenaed that the first word of the investigation came out Wednesday night. Government sources in ington continued that_there_wiU Wash volving Cleveland labor leaders but declined to divulge details. The Cleveland Plain Dealer said it had learned 20 or more Team- sters Union leaders have been sub- poenaed, as well as three officers ot the Cleveland AFL-CIO. They are to appear as witnesses. The AFL-CIO leaders subpoena- ed are William Finegan, executive secretary; William Goldberg treasurer, and Thomas E. McDon- ald, chairman of the board. Names of the Teamsters' lead- could not be Inside The Times ers subpoenaed learned. AFL CIO leaders have been Comics Death Notices Editorial Page Markets Round About Portsmouth Social News Sports Television and Radio Page! ordered to bring with them al 35 books and records of the old Cleve- land Federation'of Labor pertain- ing to payments by the Teamsters Union into special funds of tho 13 6 13 10 16-17 18-19 12 CFL. Internal Revenue Service agents served subpoenaes, indicating thai income tax affairs will be among 24 the matters investigated. the two rural Un iversalSuffi Is Goal In Algeria ham further. No Malice, Counsel Contends Commenting on the separate not guilty plea, Mr. Hale said, "There is no evidence of any malice as required by law for first- or second- degree murder. If he is sane, the most it could be is ma-slaughter. It arose spontaneously out of an argument." The insanity questxm will be de- cided by a jury when the case comes to trial. It will be up to the defense to prove insanity through the testimony of expert witnesses. The classic test of legal sanity whether the defendant can tell right from wrong. No date has been set for Stock- ham's .trial as yet. He is being held without bond in the county Judge Smith today appointed Mr. Hale as Stockham's defense coun- sel at Stockham's request. Mr. Hale told the court Stockham did not have sufficient financial means to obtain defense counsel on his own. Stockham stood for arraignment but said nothing except to ask that Mr. Hale be appointed his counsel. About 30 people, more than usual for an arraignment, were in the courtroom. 4 Admit Guilt In other arraignments guilty pleas were entered by Stanley (Buster) Reed, 23, of Wheelersburg Rt 3, three counts of larceny; Jewell Hall, 20, of South Webster Rt. 1. three counts of larceny; William I. Mullins, 21, of Beaver Rt. 1, five counts of burglary and larceny, and Charles Walker, 19, of Beaver Rt. PARIS Charles de Gaulle opened the first Nation- al Assembly of the Fifth Republic today with a pledge to work to- ward a political solution in Algeria through universal .suffrage. DC Gaulle's generalized mes- sage, read to the Assembly by its president, Jacques Chaban Del- mas, clearly implied more elec- tions or referendas in the trou- bled North African territory where rebellion has raged for four years ceny. while Gaulle's statement. The deputies stood respectfully Says Castro Ignores World View; Some Prisoners Get Jail Terms By LARRY ALLEN' HAVANA. Cuba (AP) Fresh dispatches today told of the execu- t'on of 10 more men by order ol revolutionary courts, boosting the 'reported toll to 195. The rebel leader, Fidel Castro. said the executions will' continue, regardless of world opinion about the summary justice accorded captive followers of ex-President Fulgencia Batista who are ad- judged major war criminals. "We have given orders to shoot every one of these Castro declared Wednesday night. Some convicted prisoners are getting prison terms. A few ara being freed. A tribunal at Santia- go Wednesday provisionally freed civilians and two mili- tary men. Criticism mounted abroad of the hurried military trials and firing squad deaths. But the rebel _ chief- tain asked by newsmen if the executions would be stopped.' re- plied: "No. To the contrary, we have given orders to shoot every one of these murderers. And if we have to battle world opinion to mete out justice, we are prepared to do it." Castro Reported III Castro had scheduled a news Chaban Delmas read De conference later in the evening but called it off with word that aunt s sto-'Ltiiiciiw. De Gaulle called for the Assem- he was ill. The nature of his 01- bly to put aside the bickering that ness was not disclosed but the Wakened the old Fourth Republic and finally brought about downfall. "A rigorous putting _ in order of A prerequisite to the expression ii_iiio _ of universal suffrage, De Gaulle j gauilc's one-man rule our affairs is absolutely necessary in all those areas which touch upon our national De Gaulle said. The1 assembly was tc get its first chance to discuss government pol- after mor.ths of De ......_____ _. ______'s one-man" rule before said, was the pacification and eco- Debre for a vote on his pro nomic transformation of Algeria, j sr.am_ Following De Gaulle's brief j Thc constitution of the new speech, newly named Premier Michel Debre presented to' the packed chamber the program of tlis new program supporting the Western Alliance Republic does not require parliamentary approval of De- bre's new government. He sched- uled the session to h-jar his pro- gram out of politeness and sought its the past two weeks was probably telling on him. Reports reaching Havana said 1.3 persons were put to death in Camaguey, 320 miles east of Ha- for political murders and tortures during the regime of ousted dictator Fulgeneio Batista. Five more executions were re- ported from Manzanillo, in Oriente province, where eight others were shot Monday. Three former Ba- tista soldiers were condemned to death at Colon, in west Cuba's Matanzas province. from Oriente province UTurn to DE GAULLE, Page 24) What, A Poltergeist? Shattered Panes Have Grandmother Jumping SPRINGFIELD, Mass. CAP) "I'm so nervous I'm jumping out of my rocking chair at the slight- est noise, expecting to hear more glass That is the reaction of Mrs. {jnarics waiivci, i nst uit: 1. four counts of burglary and lar- Charles Papineau, 80 year old en in the bathroom. Parker said he wanted to check possibility that temperature changes might have shattered the windows. Mrs Papineau and her 13-year- old grandson, Wayne, have, both said they heard strange thump- noises just before windows Their cases were passed for sen- tencing at a later date. Not guilty pleas were entered by Thomas Sheets, 30, of 1318-E im name's Ave., burglary and larce- to was given Turl Stevens, 43, of 712 Broad- T i _i____ i J v w'a'y St., burglary and larceny; Vaughn Bowling, 23, of Highland John riders meeung. vaugmi Also announced was approval of Bend, receiving stolen property, the incorporation of a trust depart- William E. Robinson, 32, of Rush- ment as an added service to bank town Rt. j, nine counts of forgery, astomers. and Marion p. Eldridge, 21, of The changes were announced by Camp St., Sciotoville, robbery, C P Steahly, president of the bank, j Eldridge was indicted, secretly 'The par value of the bank stock I ;or robbery after grand jury ig- will remain the same under an armed robbery charge split, bank officials said, with the against him. increase in capital being effected by transferring the increase from other capital funds. The stockholders E.'ISO reelected following to the direo-.orate forp 1959: T. K. Brushart, William A. grandmother, at whose home 39 windows have been broken since a week ago Tuesday. Police investigated, found no evidence of lawbreaking and with- ____ C. Parker, a self-styled authority on poltergeists noisy in. He said he wanted first tc. elim- inate any possible scientific ex- planation. He said he would install a re- cording thermometer in the bath- room of the frame home. Three windows have been brok- ing crashed To Bolster March Of Dimes Burke, Harry H. Colburn, F. Carl Daehler, George L. DaviSj H. Glenm Duis, Mr. Steahly and A. D. Troxel. In his message to the stockhold- ers, the president reported a highly successful year for the bank, both si earnings and growth of assets. He reported satisfactory increases were shown in both deposits and loans and that prospects for the coming year appear good. Cold Snap Likely To Put Chill On In A cold snap, accompanied by snow headed east and south to- day from the northern and central plains states and appeared destined to put a chill on the spring-like weather enjoyed She last few days 'in the Portsmouth area. After high temperatures in the 50s cury last two days, the is expected to drop to the The U. S. Weather cloudy and its move from the old bank quarters on Second and Court Sts. in 1934 to its present location in the Ma- ionic Temple Building, said that total resources have increased from at that time to today. Reorganization of the directorate is scheduled for a regular meeting, Jan. 20. Friday, with a chance oi flurries to replace the rain. three-quarters of an inch [ell in the last 24 hours instruments indicated _ at the city waterworks. After a high of 55 Wednesday, the temperature dropped to a low of 38 during the to 49 de- rasiiwv. James M. Herrmann of Seaford, N Y whose home on Long Islanc experienced some unexplained bottle-top poppings about a year ago, told the Springfield, (Mass.) Union: "The only thing to do is put your faith in God and try to go on. Don't be frightened that the things that are happening may not be explainable. Try as much as possible to control yourself and accept what is Accept it as something being visited upon you. For Polio' Sale S lated Friday, Saturday Plans for conducting a "Peanuts for Polio" sale in the downtown area Friday and Saturday were announced today. Directed by Co-Chairmen Evan Surran and James W. Berkley, the peanut sale is in connection with the March of Dimes drive now being conducted to fight polio. Mr Berkley reported that the D.m. until will be members of tne Girls As sembly, sponsored by Sheba Chap ter Order of Eastern Star. Kitty tGT UrflEi OI [ary vl O41" Mae Clay is worthy matron of the fense, felt ill upon awaking today chapter. Mrs. Amy Lowe and Mrs Mae Berkley are to serve as lead 9 p.m. until p.m. Saturday. Friday sales are to be conducted by members of Trinity Chapter of the Order of Pylhagorans. and grees at rose again a.m. ans are Charles Preston, Joe Hisle, James Robinson, Edward Ellis and James W. Berkley. Assisting the Pythagoran Order said five former were executed by military men a firing squad at BayECTio and five other follow- ers of Batista were executed at Holguin. to In Jail Estimates of those in jail await- ing trial rose to between and Castro's forces were still hunting perhaps fugitive sol- diers, police and informers ac- cused of carrying on the dicta- tor's repression. As yet, no trials or executions had been reported in Havana. Provisional President Manual Ur- rutia's government continued to give assurance thai newsmen would bs furnished names of the accused and charges against them and invited to watch the trials. But the military courts in the provinces apparently were going ahead full steam without waiting for publicity. U.S. Action Demanded To Halt Killing Spree WASHINGTON Asst. Sec- retary of State Roy Rubottorr was summoned before a congressional committee today to face a de- (Turn to CUBA, Page 24) Gen. Marshall 111 In Hospital Veteran Soldier Stricken By Spasm WASHINGTON fAP) Gen. George C. Marshall was stricken ill today and was token to the Ft. Bragg Army hospital. He was re- ported resting comfortably. Pentagon officials said that the former Army chief of staff, secre- tary of state and secretary of de- at his winter home in Pinehurst, f.C Col. Merrill Powell, a Ft. Bragg the Saturday sales medical officer, was summoned and decided to remove the vet- eran soldier and statesman to the wiv- wiU be members of the Portsmouth High School Hi-Y and Tri Hi-Y or- ganizations. Mr. Surran will direct the Saturday program. Participat- ing will be three sophomore clubs, three from the junior class and five units from the senior class. Members of the East High School Hi-Y and Tri-Hi-Y clubs are to conduct a similar sale on the streets of Sciotoville Saturday in connection with the downtown ap- stroke. hospital for observation. Powell notified the Army's Wai- ter Reed Medical Center in Wash- ington and Maj. Gen. Howard M. S n y d e r. President Eisenhower s personal physician. The seizure was informally de- scribed as a "spasm" of the sort sometimes associated with a mild peal. Marshall is 78.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication