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Piqua Leader Dispatch Newspaper Archive: August 12, 1908 - Page 1

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Publication: Piqua Leader Dispatch

Location: Piqua, Ohio

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   Piqua Leader-Dispatch (Newspaper) - August 12, 1908, Piqua, Ohio                                V r OBjiCAST. Showers AIM! cooter tonight Thiutiday fair. PIQUA The Leading Newspaper in Miami county and the Only Daily Democratic publication. VOLUME XXV. PIQUA, OHIO. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12, 1908. PRICE 2 CENTS. Coroner Begins Inquiry Traction Wreck; Witnesses are Summoned BRYAN NOTIFIED OF NOMINATION Appalling Scenes that Attended Collision. STILL TALK OF TOWN Reckless Sacrifice of Human life Will Also Be Investigated by State Railroad Commission. BODY SENT AWAY. James Kehoe, one of the killed, was the support of his mother in Dayton. About four years ago his father was missing for a week when young Kehoe went to the stable mow to look for something he wanted and found the dead body of his father, who it was supposed had died of heart trouble.. He was twenty-thre% years of age and unmarried, Relatives of the young man came to Piqua and from here went to Sidney in a big automobile yesterday morning after the remains. They were sent south at o'clock yesterday morning. ern Ohio wreck cars scene earty Interest in th'e Western Ohio catastrophe near the Shelby county infirmary has continued unabated to- day. Inquiries after the condition of the lhave been frequent. As the facts and circum- stances more clearly reveal themselves it seems clear that a -misunderstanding of orders is responsible for it all. There is no question that the north bound car had orders to take stop 70, while the south bound car was making for stop 71. There is no room to be- lieve that Bailey could have been mistaken in receiving the orders. There were persons in the traction de- pot in Piqua who heard him taking the order from -the dispatcher, and heard Mm repeat it over again to that official after receiving it. No change or alteration was made, and the presumption is that Bailey received and repeated his order cor- rectly. Where the Conflict Comes. What the orders for the south bound car were may only be conjectured here. It lies between the dis- patcher and the inotorinan of that car. The dispatcher may have given a "lap that is such an order as covers or laps over an- other order, and giving two cars or trains going in oppo- site directions right of way over the same track. Halo may have received the order .incorrectly, and in repeating it, the dispatcher may have d to catch the error. Traffic was run as usual over the lines of the West- Tuesday. The were on the the morning after the wreck and cleared up the track. Monday night there was practically no traffic eouth ol Sidney, and 'the only cars ran -were those necessary to 'bring to .the scene of the wreck 'the doctors who were called and to bring hack ifche in- jured. From the time tihe first re- lief car started, shortly after o'clock, until or no car came down. Then the first car those passengers who had o'clock before the inert cat came icfiow.n, 'bringing onio're of the In- jured. In-fact there are numerdllS But Remain at Infirmary. Conjectures that 'maybe But of injured are now made, while the truth may be revealed at the coroner's inquest, which began this morning at 9 or it] The most .injured may never be known. Galllet Gau-ler, of Convoy, Allen a.t the 'infirmary, and t'hey are re- ported to be in a serious condition. The iphysieians state, however, that all will probably recover. county. He has a had wo-un-d in the 'back of his head, which possibly may result in his death. The is 'fractured and the brain is exposed about the cize of a dollar. Tuesday morning Dr. Roberts of Wapakoneta and Dr. Hirssey of Sidney, made a thorough examination of (his wound. Fragments oif his skull were burled in 'his brain. They picked out .about twenty or twenty-five .pieces of-bone. It was a very delicate operation-, but the p-hyislciants think-'they -will'be suc- cessful in savting- the man's life. will remain at 'infirmary -for sev- eral days yet. Charles Hale, the motor man who was deadheading (his way from Wa- to Piqua, is considered to be seriously injured. His chest is terribly crushed and he is injured He also has a 'bad scalp wound and one. of his hands, is crushed almost He was to make the local run back to Wa- rpafconeta after he 'had arrived in Piqua. He 'is still at the infirmary, j IS On Scene Nathan Cox of Dayton, was re- moved to 'Ms home today. His 'back is 'badly sprained, and fae is badly jarred and bruised all over the body. The Other Injured. John Matter Dayton, has a ter- rific scalip wound on the top of head and Ms back and left leg are injured. His condition is con- sidered serious, but he was able to be taken to "his home today. C. F. Roberts, who has been stop- ping dn Sidney for some time, was on the north bound car. His right leg was badly bruised, and his hands and 'face were cut by the broken glass. Frank A. Burkhart oif Lima, was among the number injured. He t.aken to his home at Lima late .Monday might. He is injured about ihe and it is feared that he is infernally injured. Mrs. Barbara Ackerley and Miss Minnie Aekerley, who are at theii home in Sidney, are reported to improving. Mrs. Ackerley has a gasih in-her forehead and Miss Acker- iy h.---i a badly sprained no-se and one of her lim'bs ds badly scratched and Reports received. from Lawrence Agenbroad at Lockington are that lie 'is improving. R. conductor on the north b-' far improved yes- 'he was able to be to h'is His shoulder was badly crushed, his collar bone is broken and he was Concluded On 8th Page. iiippeoanoe. Gala Occasion In CLAYTON THE SPOKESMAN Alabama Congress- man Headed the Notification C o m mittee and Delivered an Able Address, Mr. Bryan Following With His Speech of Acceptance. James Kehoe I't-i'oiv irnnd. grown sufficiently' light To The Dally Xows staff photogr.'ilipor, who o.irly on tho scene'to take a, plci.ure, practically every vestige of the frightful on the Ohio Traction lino had hcon jiirciuiy nimovo.i by thr wrecking crow. In the picture of above illustration th'- wiwkini; is show.i pku-lncr on the car tho last of tlin wivrkod   portrait is Ihst of Mr. in lo insl.itutton for tho cnro of the vic- tims, In many ways. Slio.vers Jind his wife witnessed the ,'ierl'lent from J'nc of the infirmary, and his description will bo round elsewhere. Dailv Lincoln, Neb., Aug. Ma- lone's battery went into action at sun- rise and with a booming salute of for- ty-one guns announced to the nation that the ceremonies attending the no- tification of William Jennings Bryan of his nomination for the presidency for the third time had opened. The notification of Mr. Bryan and the delivery of his speech of accept- ance brought to Lincoln an imposing gathering of distinguished men and men of prominence of both the Re- publican and Democratic parties, for Mr. Bryan and his friends followed the novel course of making the notifi- cation celebration a nonpartlsan affair ia every respect. State officials, mem- bers of the legislature from hoth par- ties, partook in the doings of the day to honor Nebraska's leading citizen as a man and a citizen and not alone as the leader of a great politic party. The making of the ceremony uofc- partisan was brought about as the re- sult of a conference between Gorernor Sheldon, National Committeeman Hall and Mayor Brown and a committee of itizens of Lincoln. The Three Important Features. The three features of leading impor- tance were the speeches of Mr.Bryan, John W. Kern, the candidate for vice president, and Congressman H. D. Clayton of Alabama, permanent chair- man of the Democratic national con- vention, who headed the notification committee and delivered, an able ad- dress of notification. The speeches were delivered from a platform seating 200 people and adorn- ed with American flags erected on the north side of the state capitol build- ing, and thousands of interested hear- ers and onlookers gathered about this stand, frequently interrupting the speeches with enthusiastic applause. Congressman Clayton gained new Clayton's Address. Congrewsman who made the notification speech, said: Mr. Bryan: The natlonjd Democrats convention that assembled at .Denver on 7 was truly a representative body of the people of the United Hat- mony characterized its .deliberations, and ail of its conclusions were" "irttH unanimity. It stood for the of government under a writte tion and for the application cratic principles in public to the requirements of can civilization. Without the Intervention of ed ballot you were nominated tor: th< office of president of United; A. committee, composed chairman and one delegate, each state and territory, to inform you of your standard-bearer of your itt pending: campaign. ance of the convention, this now brings to you this message a united and aggressive Democraejr. great party is confident of the ness of its cause and, relying upon support of tho people, is to rescue the government- of- the have exploited it for the benefit of- HENRY D. OL.AYT.OSr. "We Tv'no-vr that' our party; platform and candidate- stand for the interest. Of all the people. We know, .that deserved. We that .-our' patty and candidate, animated by the. wisest--.and most patriotic purposes, will; r.tjhievt: tory in November. On no is the platform straddle or -evasion, 1 and its every declaration anuares -with the principles of oU-fashionoc! Democ- racy. It is essentially a Dcrmi'-ratic strument. pri-s-rrvins and applying- faith of the fathers to existing1 condi- tions. It is hardly worth .while to say, sir, that in the of your .-pony Asso- and our countrymen generally you. as our candidate, fit our platform. AnJ it :s equally gratifying that there isnoth- ing in the platform cahing: for an apol- ogy. There is nothing that you would avoid or run away from. There is ;nqtkr Ing- omitted ffot you-need supply ing your individual vie 'a. Jn spects you have a tremendous advantage over your Republican opponenf. Standing on such a platform, possessed.-. of an abiding conviction that our cause is juflt, you will draw the keen blade of ;rifftt-: eousness in truth, throwing- away the scabbard, and agat for the principle of equal rights to all ar.d special privilege! to none. Tour party has emphatically refused to form any alliance with rpecial Interests that enjoy special .privileges under Republican administration. Toti have always refused to compromise with those who prostitute the functitns. of government, for the lust of greed. It. was your lofty statesmanship; your unwaver- fame as a man of oratorical ability by ing fidelity, your Jefferson standard of James S. Kehoe, the victim of the traction accident, resided at 252 Chestnut street with his widowed mother, sister and brothvr. as he wa.s always called, was one of the most popular and well-known young men of this city. For eight years he has been employed at the Na- tional Cash Register company as a clerk and has earned the friendship and respect of all with whom he came in contact. Two years ago last Xew Year's day his father. Samuel Kehoe, was found dead at the family residence, and his mother barely survived the shock. Since that time being the oldar of the children, managed the family affairs only a dutiful son could, and his loss at this time has nearly broken the hearts of his fond mother, sister and brother. He had been spending a week in Detroit and was on his return home he met his death. He had intended arriving in this city in time to go with the other members of the family to the cemetery and place flow- ers on the-gra.ve of his father, Tuesday, being the anniversary of the fath- or's birth. The young man had only the trip to Detroit after having changed his mind; in reganKto two other vacation plans. At first ho had intended to take a trip to Chicago with his closest friend, Walter Mat- thews, but was unable to arrange matters for that timo. His next intention was to go to Koston, but circumstances again compelled him to abandon the trip, so he went to Detroit a.s a third choice. It seemed as if he had been marked by Tato, for his companion on sent, Herbert Allen, es- caped with slight injuries. The many friends of the young mnn about the city were horror strick- en at the sudden ending of a life that bore such great promise and words of sympathy were to be heard on all sides. Tie Is survived by his mother, Mrs. Samuel Kehoe, his sister Annn and his brother Samuel, who la em- ployed in the same department at the X. 0, 11. The first, word which the family received w.is from Herbert Allon, who arrived in the city about midnight. The body of the deceased arrived in the city at and is now at the family residence. No arrangements have yet been completed for the Daily News. reason of his effective address. His high tribute to the qualities of Mr. Bryan, both as a public man and as a private individual, was well received. Mr. Bryan was compelled to wait several minutes owing to the applause which greeted him when he stepped forward to offer his speech of accept- ance. Probably the greatest measure of the audience's approval was given when Mr. Bryan spoke on the subject of corporations and advocated a more strict governmental regulation of them. His statements concerning phases of the labor situation also at- tracted particular attention. Mr. Bryan's Oratorical Powers. Mr. Bryan's powers as an orator were seldom better displayed in spite of the difficulties attending outdoor speaking before a large gathering. He spoke with frequent gesture, and his voice carried well to the outskirts of the crowd. At the close of the formal notifica- tion program Mr. Bryan, accompanied by Mrs. Bryan, other members of his family, members of the notification committee and prominent citizens of Nebraska and other states. ed to the state capitol building, where, in one of the legislative cham- bers., Mr. Bryan hold an informal teption. Committee Will Dine at Fairview. At this evening the notification committee will arrive at Mr. Bryan's home, Fairview, where on the lawn j the candidate will tender an elaborate dinner. At, the conclusion of this pa- rading bands will march by and sa- lute Mr. Bryan and his guests, and brilliant displays of fireworks by en- thusiastic Lincoln citizens will marlt the close of the day's festivities. Tho business men of the city co- operated with the duly appointed offl- ftials in the day a gala tn every detail. American flags bunting wore everywhere.and as early Democracy that induced the tives of millions of American, .freemen unanimously to choose you as their can- didate for the highest office in the :world. It would.be inappropriate for me to. de- __ tain this splendid audience that'hM mat j here today to listen to your patriotic an4 eloquent words. Therefore. I now hand you an authenticated' "py the plat- form adopted by the .1 ft rrocratic conven- tion at Denver, and request the secre- tary to the formal Intter of notifica- tion signed by the committee. Chairman Norman E. Mack, of the Democratic national committee was among the prominent men who at- tended the notification cerepaooiss. During the day he found time to dis- cuss vjiih Mr. Bryan the general of campaign. BRYAN. KECKIVTN--T HIS NOTIFI In 'Ivi'S address Mr. Bryan said: Mr. Clayton aud Geutienen of the Notification Committee: I cau uot ac- as 10 o'clock this morning public band thft nomlnatioa wblcll you offlcial- concerts weic held In the capitol j firgt acknowledginy a Bryan, Mr. Kern and the notification ic party for the extraordinary honor committee at the Lincoln hotel. It was 1 which it has conferred upou me. Har- almost two hours later when the com- ing twice before been, a candidate for mittco, accompanied by Mr. Bryan tije presidency, In campaigns which and Mr. Kern, were escorted in car- riages loathe capitol grounds by a procession, headed by a platoon of uolice a.nd the Nebraska state band. ended in defeat, a third tho result of the froe and voluntary act of   

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