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Piqua Daily Press: Wednesday, October 24, 1917 - Page 1

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   Piqua Daily Press (Newspaper) - October 24, 1917, Piqua, Ohio                                Wtu-'s Exacting Toll. LONDON, October totjil on sun Hi es jn all districts from tluJ Zeppelin raid or last Friday were 34 killed and 5tt injRrcxl, it is reported otliciully. Au incomplete olHcial an- nouncement made last Saturday gave tiie total us 37 killed and 53 injur- ed. WESTERN NEWSPAPER UNION AND SPECIAL WIRE SERVICE. Borrow and Buy! The Time For Argument Is Past! Is The Slogan of The Liberty Bond Workers. AVAR'S EXACTING PARIS, October lord, of Brooklyn N. Y., ait can aviator with the French army, was killed while an tion school October 15, according news received here yesterday, ford was a peorgetown University student. will bo cloudy, b ut it may also be warmer. PIQUA, OHIO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1917. VOL. II, NO. 254 SINN FEINER UNDER ARREST r _ Had In His Possesion a Sea- man's Passport. GERMAN ENGINEER ALSO HELD French Generals Who Share Glory of Brilliant Victory Over Huns at Verdun Arrests Made at New York on the Eve of Premier Lloyd-George's Admis- sion That Arrangements Are Being Made, Partly by Von Bernstorff, to Land Arms In Flynn Talks. y New York, Oct. the eve of an announcement by Premier Lloyl George in the house of commons that the British government had knowl- edge of another plot to land arms in Ireland, important arrests were made in this city. Liam Mellowes, one of the recogniz- ed leaders in the Sinn Fein rebellion in Ireland, on Easter Monday, 1916, and an associate, Baron Dr. Max Reckinghausen, a German subject, arc- detained here, it was announced, by William J. Flynn, chief of the Ilriite'l States secret service. Mellowes is charged with obtaining false papers to enable him to leave the United States as an. American sea man. Von Recklinghausen, styled b> Flynn as a "patent engineer of no lit tie has been turned over to federal authorities for internment our ing the war. He is declared to been an intimate associate of Sim Fieners. A statement issued by Flym said papers found in Von Reckling hausen's rooms and on his person show definitely that large sums o money, had gone forward to France for ultimate German purposes. Mellowes was 'arrested in posses- sion of a seaman's passport, made on', in the name of "Patrick Donnelly." and whicn it is declared he intended to use in returning to Ireland at the earliest opportunity. After the failure of the Irish revolu- tion last year, Mellowes his way to the United States by shipping as a coal heaver, according 'to Fl vim's statement. Secret service agents had him under surveillance shortly his arrival and learned of nis associa.- tion with Dr. Patrick McCaitoa, known to his Sinn Fein associates in this country as "the first ambassador to the United States of the Irisli re- the statement said. They plotted to return to Ireland and McCarton shipped on an Ameri- can steamship leaving Ne'w York last Wednesday. On advices from New' York secret service men, M'cCarton was arrested at Halifax and is being held there, pending prosecution for his complicity in Uie Dublin riots and his activities in this country since early last according to Flynn. "Considerable literature and papers of interest to this ,government were taken in the raid of the premises of Mellowes- Von Recklinghausen and it will be some time before the variable ramifications of this plot can 'be thorough! jr said Fiynu, in announcing the arrests. He declar- ed Von Recklinghausen "nas been mentioned as an envoy left here by Count Von and that he maintained two residences in New York, one of which is near an East river bridge, commanding a clear view of the river. ALL PIQUA MOURNS BECAUSE OF DEATH OF REV. DR, MONTGOMERY Rev. John Montgomery, D. D., pas- tor of the Presbyterian church in this city, died'at 9 o'clock Tuesday even- ing, October 23, 1917, at cast a gloom over the entire district, ;as he was' known as one of the most broadminded of men and was highly esteemed by the members of all de- J. A. JOHNSON, JR. Commander of Northeastern District is Stationed at Boston. Memorial hospital. Dr. Montgome-j nominations, both white and colored. ery's accident two weeks ago, in The funeral services will be held These are the heroes of the recent French drive on Verdun: General Riols de Fonclare, recently promoted to Grand-Officer-of-the Legion of Honor, and General Corvisart. whose divisions captured Dead Man's Hill in one of the most brilliant battles of the war.. -They led the successful French forces as they drove the Germans from their supposedly impreg- nable positions. The picture was taken a short distance from the battle lines in a country which has been literally torn to pieces by shells and shrapnel. generals alone stand responsible for the remarkable fight of the French at this important point on the western front. which both of his legs were broken, brought on another' attack of stom- ach trouble and he was operated upon yesterday, but his condition was such that he was unable to stand the ef- fects of the operation, and his suf- ferings were relieved by the hand of death. He is survived by his wife and six children: Helen, Emily, Es- ther, William, -Martha and Mary Elizabeth; three brothers: Frank, of Van Wert, O.; Leander, of Newton Falls, O., and Dr. West Montgomery rof Ada, O., and one sister, Mrs. Clara Pore, Findlay. Dr. Montgomery was born in Han- cock county fifty-one years ago; was educated at Ohio Northern uni- versity at Ada, and later entered the preparatory and theological school at 'Princeton, N. J., from which he grad- uated. 'During his pastorate in this city Princeton conferred on him the degree of Doctor of .Divinity. His first charge was at Poling and Ka- lida, and during his. pastorate there BANKS NOT REQUIRED TO "CHARGE DOWN" HIGH GLASS SECURITIES TO MARKET PRICES he was married to Miss Nora Be- Vier of Plymouth, who survives him. He also spent five years in Newark, O., and five in Findlay, O., coming to this city from the latter place 11 years ago, his anniversary being cele- brated a few weeks ago. The death of Dr. Montgomery has Friday afternoon from the Presby- terian church at 2 o'clock, at which the following will be the order of service: Presiding Minister, Rev. Roy G. Hershey. Invocation, Rev. W. Barrett, Belle- fontaine. Reading of Hymn, Rev. H. Ear- nest, Covington. Scripture, Rev. W. J. Dempster, Urbana. Prayer, Rev. W. B. Love, Sidney. Reading of Hymn, Rev. C. E. Ted- ford, Fletcher. Address, Home Life of Dr. Mont- gomery, Rev. Z. B. Campbell, Col- umbua. Address, Dr. Montgomery as Pas- tor, Rev. J. H. Gross, Marietta. Music, Choir. Address, Dr. Montgomery as Citi- zen, Rev. C. S. Grauser, Piqua. Address, The Larger Aspect, Rev. L. S. Boyce, Dayton. Reading of Hymn, Rev. G. McKin- ney, Chillicothe. Benediction, Rev. R. H. Dunaway, Troy. The body of Dr. John Montgomery will lay in state in the First Presby- terian church Thursday evening from seven to nine-thirty, and Friday morning from nine to twelve o'clock. FRENCH SMASH GERMAN LINES Score a Notable Victory North- east of Soissons. TAKE MEN AND GUNS WASHINGTON, Oct. Since the commencement of war Treasury Department authorizes the following: After the outbreak of the Euro- pean war in 1914, the Comptroller of ,the Currency instructed national bank examiners that national banks need not be required to charge down the values of their highgrade bonds between this country and Germany, there has been a heavy depreciation in the quoted values- of securities generally, including those of the very highest grade which have hereto- fore found a ready market in com- petition with Government issues; and in many cases prices have to "meet the abnormal and sacrifice j shrunk to figures which are manifest- quotations for awhile were ly far below the prices which would being'made on the outside markets i prevail under any normal conditions. from the National Car Service Asso7 ciation. "The situation was indeed a seri- ous writes the Railroad Com- mission of Texas, in a statement signed by all its members, "and men- aced not only the cattle raising and shipping industry of this State but the food supply of the Nation as well. Before the appeal to you a critical stage ;had been reached and it was absolutely necessary that as- sistance be had from outside the State, and are glad you recogniz- ed the urgent necessity of our ap- peal." (the stock exchanges being closed) on securities which at that time were being thrown overboard regardless of real worth. This office also earnestly endeavor- ed to prevent the sacrifice by nation- al banks, whilethe exchanges were closed and there was no general mar- ket for securities, of bonds and shares held as collateral for customer's oans. Grave Losses Averted. The policy pursued proved fortun- ate at that time. After the first pressure over and mone3r condi- tions relaxed, the security market was re-established; the grave losses which were threatened by the tem- porary shrinkage in values were averted, and borrowers from banks were enabled to meet their obliga- tions without the sacrifice of their collateral. This or marking down of values is partly due to the efforts of investors to sell other high-class securities for reinvestment in Gov- ernment bonds. Instructions to Examiners. In view of all conditions, the Comp- troller of the Currency has instructed national bank examiners that they need not at this time require nation- al banks high-grade bonds of unquestioned intrinsic value and merit to charge such investments down to present abnormal figures; but an intelligent and conservative discretion will be exercised as to the jrices at which national banks can safely and reasonably be permitted to carry such high-class securities, and as to what proportion of the de- preciation should be charged off in any six months' period. NEW AVIATORS TO LEAVE SOON FOR FOREIGN SIEID DAYTON, Oct. largest contingent of cadets sent from the Wilbur Wright field since training began there were ordered yesterday to prepare to leave on the first le; of their journey to France some time today. Although publication of the exac 'number leaving is prohibited by the field censor, it is said that the num THIRTY THOUSAND PASS IN REVIEW Boys at Gamp Sherman Make Fine Showing. aid which would entirely destroy Uie vrupp munition works in Germany, providing, of course, if they were horouglily trained. The number Avould also be suffi- cient to combat a fleet of .German planes the size of which have, recent-. y raided London. The cadets have completed their training at the Wilbur Wright, field and will take further and higher training "somewhere else in Ameri- ca" before leaving for France. Intimation was also given out at the field that several aero squadrons are preparing to leave. During the last few days officers of the field have permitted all enlisted men of the squadrons which are to leave to change -to another squadron if they do not want to go to France immed- iately. Hundreds of soldiers have thus changed to other squadrons, it is said. A few of the soldiers -were or- dered to other squadrons if their ser- vices are further needed at the field. COMPLIMENTED BY GOVERNOR ?vlajor General GLenn Would LProvide Means For Visits of the Relatives .and. Friends of .Selective Dr-aft Solr Cox a Speaker at by the Chillicothe Dinner Given War Council. Chillicothe, O., Oct Governor Cox men, drawn for military service, passed in review at Camp Sherman, the first review since the men dropped the cares of civilian life. Mighty and Unexpected Blow Struck by General Petain's Forces, Import ant Positions Being Wrested .From the Germans Russians Sink ber of Teuton Opra- tions of the Day. London, Oct. 24, The Freric! troops smashed through, the Genriar lines north of the Aisne to a depth" 6 more than two miles at one point, jn flicted heavy losses on the enemy an captured more than prisoners and 25 guns and field guns; Several. important villages also fell into the hands of the French. The stroke was made over a front of about six miles, from the east. .at Vauxaillon to Pargny-Filain, northeast of Soissons. Under weather conditions, the French. push- ed forward all along the line, aided by audacious aviators, who flew over the German positions at an altitude about 150 feet, using their machine guns, and penetrated the German line at one point to a depth of two and a; fifth miles. The greatest depth of the drive was in the center of the line, where village of Chavignon was after a violent struggle; -which result ed in the enemy's fleeing pell mell. For about a week the French artillery had been hurling tons of steel into.tiie' German lines in .front :of .'them, -in. preparation for the drive, and when it was started sad havoc already -had been, wrought by the" gains..- In. addi-; tion. to the prisoners taken" by th'e; French the Germans also suffered heavy A In Flanders, both the British -and1 French troops: are -holding all the gains made in Monday's drive -norto.-. east of Ypres, except at one place on, the southern fringe of the Houthoist forest, -where the Germans in a ous counter attack forced a slight re- tirement by the 'British. French and -British reinforcements are arriving daily at the Italian front. Large quantities of munitions and- It took 38 minutes for the HtCa army making up.the Eighty-third divi- sion to pass the reviewing officers and party. As the last man filed past, Ma- jor General B. E. Glenn said he was Don't forget to have a costume for the big Hallowe'en celebration to be put on by the T. M. A. Monday night. A big. dance will feature the.festiv- ities and a large number of 'prizes ber would be sufficient to conduct a will be awarded to those in costume. Irish Plot Foiled. London, Oot the course of a speech in the house of commons, Premier Lloyd-George declared the government was aware that arrange- ments were again being made, partly by Count Von Bernstorff, to land arms In Ireland. The premier said that the government could not possibly forget had happened only IS months ago. These speeches could not be treated as excited speeches, delivered by persons of no consequences, which would end in nothing. He added that Incitement to rebellion would not be permitted. NO ORDERS YET ON NEW PLAN OOD ADMINISTRATION AIDS IN SAVING HUNDREDS OF HEAD CATTLE FROM DEATH No orders relating to the new sys tern of selecting men for the seconc draft have been received by local draft boards as yet. Because of the premature publication of the new system some little discussion has been aroused at Washington, nnd it is likely that local boards will not be ordered officially to select their men accordingly for some time. Harry Baker, giving his address as Ironton, O., was arrested on a va- grancy charge last night and after a night in the city jail, was ordered to make himself scarce. A meat delivery auto skidded on the pavement in the vicinity of Ash and Broadway yesterdap afternoon and smashed a wheel when the ma- chine hit the curb. No one was hurt. WASHINGTON, Oct. Food Administration authorizes the following: The State railroad commission of Texas, for itself and on behalf of the cattle-raising industry and the people of the State generally, has sent the United States Food Admin- istration an expression of .thanks for the assistance it rendered in the matter of moving cars of live stock from drought stricken sec- tions of that State to other locations where pasturage and water could be obtained for them. An "appeal tvas issued to the Food Administration stating that a portioi of Texas was undergoing the mosi severe drought in the history of the tie were dying by the hundreds fo State for many years, and that cat lack of food and water. Within 4J hours from the time the appea reached the Food Administration stock cars were moving westward t the stricken districts. Unable to Get Slock Cars. The worst conditions prevailed along the lines of the Texas and Pa- the West a sufficient number of stock cars to get the cattle out of the coun- try. In an official statement of pre- vailing conditions made on behalf of the Orient Railroad, a traffic offi- cial of that line said: "We believe we are now handling lore hides taken from carcasses han we are shipping cattle on oof." Edward Chambers, head, and F. L Brooks, assistant head of the s ransportation division of the Food Vdministratioii immediately took charge of the situation and obtained cars in the eastern section of the country and sent them to the strick- From Shelters in Buildings Destroyed By Boches, French Pour Deadly Fire at Emeny pleased, "well pleased." Governor James M. Cox, for whom the big pa- geant had been arranged, also ex- pressed satisfaction. The review was held under adverse circumstances. The day. was dark and gloomy and it was .muddy under foot. en sections. The Pennsylvania, Wabash, C., B. and Q and Missouri Pacific lines furnished the first quo- ta of S75 cars, the major portion of which came from Pennsylvania. A second consignment was required, of which the Chicago and Northwest- ern furnished 300 cars, the- Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul 100, and the El Paso and Southwestern 150. Some additional cars were obtained from other sources. These were di- vided about equally between the ter- ritory covered by the Texas and Pa- cific and that tributary to the Orient, and a total of about cars of the suffering cattle were at once trans- ferred to other sections of the coun- try, where pasture and grass could cific, and Kansas City, Mexico and i be obtained. he soldiers. Two dreadnoughts, one cruiser, boats, a transport and numer-' us mine sweepers put out of actioni r lost, is the total which Germany: General Glenn and Governor Cox re- sponded to toasts at a dinner given by the Ciiillicotlie war council. General Glenn said most of the at Camp Sherman had been solved, but one of the most important, not only for the camp and for the men, but for the success of the Ohio army, is yet to be assured. That, he said, is some means for providing for the visits of relatives and friends of selec- tive soldiers. He told of the pledge of Ohio women to build 500 cot- tages at a cost of" to take care of these relatives and friends and urged Governor Cox to lend influence to the siiccess of the under taking. "It has been the history of al armies and it ma'y be a menace now unless cared for, that desertion wil follow if the soldiers can not see and be witli their wives, their parents their brothers and sisters and thei frien-ds a said General Glenn "The army is but the edge the knife, there must be something to drive it home. That necessarily rests with the people of Ohio who stay at home. We want all the people of a'tl of Ohio back of us and helping us." Governor Cox referred to the selec- tion of Chillicothe for a training camp as being "in the nature of pointing out that it had been the chosen point for the mound builders in prehistoric times, the seat of gov- ernment of the most intelligent Indian tribes and one of the first points in Ohio to be developed, by the whites in the pioneer days. He that every Ohio citizen "strike down the seed of and declared that the re- sources, intelligence and patriotism of Ohio was backing the drafted men at Camp Sherman. He concluded by ex- pressing the wish thr.t General Glenn be kept in command of the Ohio boys that the fates be kind to him and his troops. has been forced to pay for her occn-; pation of Oesel, Moon and Dago. is-. ands with the adjacent bit of coast! at Werder, according to _a of i; Russian naval operations. The mate fate of this big number of ships' s unknown, according to the ment, but the loss of six torpedo boats! was definitely established. The Gei-' man naval squadron suffered -froia! mines, torpedoes and the fire sian naval guns and shore batteries: i WHAT THE STATE WAR BOARD SAYS COLUMBUS, Oct. 24 Have you. stored garden" vegetables against winter needs and high pri- ces? Remember that "Save Food" -is America's war cry. Beets, carrots, cabbage, celery, dry beans, dry lima beans, onions, parsnips, potatoes, Irish and ill can be saved by winter storage n pits and banks, or in cabes and outdoor cellars. Select well-drained sites for pits and banks. A shallow excavation ome S or 10 inches deep, and of suitable width, will answer. Line this with straw or leaves and place vegetables therein in a conical pile. Then cover your pile with straw, and then with earth, the. depth de- pending upon severity of the winter. Protect with additional straw, corn stalks, or manure during extreme cold. The outdoor cellar or cave is bet- ter, but the expense of construction is greater. Store the a way to "mine" the Huns. Orient, railroads, and these lines j Tfte work of the Food Administra- were unable to obtain' anywhere, in Hion received "co-operation j v. The destruction of public buildings by the Germans in France, while distressing to the residents of villages which have been visited, has not been wholly satisfactory to the invaders. For the French in their recent offensive movements have found in these same ruined buildings some ad- vantageous shelters. Here they have hidden their machine gun batteries and are mowing down the Huns who are opposing them in the open coun- try. The French arc fighting like demons at this point "somewhere in France." Their recent drive has been one of the most effective of the war. Miss Phyllis Ayres and Miss Hazel Metcalf entertained a number of their friends last evening with masquerade party, at the home o Miss Ayres on Harrison street. The evening was spent with dancing, afte which the hostesses served daint> AMERICAN VESSEL SUNK BUENOS AIRES, Oct. sinking of the American steamer, Santa Elena, with 24 lives loat, Is re- ported in dispatches from Spain to- day. The Santa Elena .wai ot the German ships seized by States, enective ot the wan ;_ staiet,   

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