Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Piqua Daily Call: Monday, October 12, 1936 - Page 2

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Piqua Daily Call, The (Newspaper) - October 12, 1936, Piqua, Ohio                              -JAGETWO THE PIOIJA DAILY CALL MONDAY nrrnnn 19 ETY MiMIe West District Meeting Hen Piqua club women are all agog over the prolspect of being hosts to the meeting ol the Middle West District Ohio Federation of Wo- men's dubs, which takes place In this city October 20 and 21, with headquarters at the Presbyterian church. This la the first time In eight years that Piqua has entertained this organization and about 200 women are expected to take part in the two-day meetings. A happy feature of the event Is that Piqua clubs will donate money according to their size and with this amount delegates' expenses will be paid at the Hotel Favorite. Meetings open at nine o'clock Tuesday and continue until the close of Wednesday afternoon ses- sions. Two luncheons, a breakfast and a dinner will be included in the events. Miss Lottie Leas of Greenville is president of the Middle West dis- trict, a position in which she suc- ceeded Miss Nellie McCabe of this city. ________ HELPS PREVENT MANY COLDS Especially designed aid for nose and upper throat, where most colds start. Regular VICKS VATRO NOL 33 COLLEGES UNIVERSITIES DODGE TAXI BUS CO, W. High St. Phone 282 1'lLAKE ERIE BUS CO. Philo Festival Dance Tuesday, Oct. 13, 1936 Winter Garden Harold Greenamyer's ORCHESTRA Table Reservations- Phone 237 Book Hcrlew Tuesday Intellectual aneamla during the past four months might be defined in terms of those who have nol read nor are interested in reading Margaret Mitchell's phenominal best seller, "Gone With the Wind. It is a book as widely discussed as three years ago was "Anthony Ad- verse." Everybody arrives at its discussion conversationally sooner or later. So that Piqua women may hear expert criticism of this incredibly popular novel, Greene Street M. E. church Guild is bringing De- pew Head of Columbus to this city Tuesday afternoon at the church, where she will discuss the book at two o'clock. The public is invited to attend and those who have not already purchased tickets may do so at the door or from members of the com- mittee: Mrs. George Foster, Mrs. John C. Cron and Mrs. Fred Shane. Dinner Bridge for Country Club Members Announcement is made today of a dinner bridge for Piqua Country club members, both men and wo- men, on next Saturday night, Octo- ber 17, when a dinner will be served at seven o'clock, followed by cards. This is not one of the regular mixed card as table are to be made up beforehand for the bridge rubbers, there will be no pro- gressing nor prizes. Such a Saturday night party will be a decided innovation but pro- mises to be completely attractive and to solve the problem of what to do on that one night of the week when everybody feels they ought to do something. Mr. Hamilton, Country club ste- ward, insists that reservations for dinner be made on or before Thurs- day, October 15. Modern Mothers to Meet For First Session of Year Modern Mothers, Child Conserva- tion League of America, will meet for the first time this season Tues- day evening at. eight o'clock at the home of Mrs. William Walker, 715 West Greene street, when every member Is urged to be present. Fhilathea Class to Meet Wednesday The Fhilathea dass of St. Paul's Evangelical Sunday school will meet Wednesday evening, October 14, with Mrs. Bmil Schelle at her home 415 Riverside Drive, for its regular monthly session, when it is hoped a good attendance will be present. Sodality Meeting Tonight Members of the Young Ladles Sodality of St. Boniface church will meet for their initial session this evening to the school hall, when election of officers will take place, followed by a social hour of which Miss Hilda Ramelmeyer chair- man. Westminster Missionary Society Mrs. John Yenney was hostess to the Westminster Missionary society of the Presbyterian church at her home on North Downing street, Friday evening, October 9th. The meeting was opened with de- votions by Mrs. W. B. Hanselman choosing sketches' from the Year- book of Prayer for her subject fol- lowed by prayer. The study for the evening was the African Negro. Miss Anna Taylor gave a sketch of the life of Julia Lake Kellersberger, who was No finer tribute can be paid us than the often re- peated phrase, "Just as they would have wished it." There is never a de- tail in the wishes of the family which is too small to receive our most thoughtful attention. F I N F IR. O> C IIC F UN E IX A L 638 N. MAIN jr Ervvic E MA. 609 Pictured above is the Execeutive Board of the Ohio Newspaper Women's Association which met October 2nd to 4th at Columbus for their 34th annual convention. The picture was taken Friday evening, the second, when members were entertained at the Columbus Press club, guests of press men of that city in their handsome new club rooms on Gay street. Members of the Executive Board including officers of the O. N. W. A. are, seated in the first row, left to right: Ruth Neely Prance, Cincinnati, membership chairman; Jane Williams, Mansfield News- Journal, president; Anne Amos, Sidney Daily News, vice president. Left to right in the second row are Irene Hipp Wenning, Mansfield, cor- responding secretary; Lola J. Hill, Piqua Daily Call, contest co-chairman; Helen Allyn, Cleveland Press, recording secretary; Dorothy Todd Fos- ter, Columbus Dispatch, treasurer; and Norma Hendricks Bixler, Yel- low Springs, former Cleveland Plain Dealer feature writer, contest co- chairman. bom in Georgia ana who wrote "Congo which was re- viewed by Mrs. Ralph Gunter in her usual manner. A most inter- esting book enjoyed by all who had the privilege of hearing Mrs. Gun- ter. Miss Marie Small, president closed the meeting with prayer Assisting hostesses with Mrs. Yen- ney were Mrs. Leon Roberts, Mrs James Hunter, Misses Anna Taylor Mary Adams and Ruth Miles. Mrs. Robert Richardson was a guest of the evening. Jolly Twenty One Mrs. Joseph Beckert, at her home on Young street, will entertain members of the Jolly Twenty-One club on Wednesday afternoon. Wesleyan Guild The Wesleyan Guild of Grace M. I. church will hold its first meeting of the season Tuesday evening at the home of Miss Ogretta Hofhelnz, 1039 Broadway. Ladles Aid Society The Ladies Aid Society of the First Reformed church will meet Thursday afternoon at the home of Mrs. Charles Trostle on Garnsey street when assisting hostesses will be Mrs. Bernard Groven, Mrs. C.C Gensler, Mrs. Sophie Weishardt and Mrs. Earl Hatoi. Bridge Party Saturday Miss Anna Marie Kienle enter- tained a few friends at bridge Sat- urday evening at her home on Mi- ami street. Miss Ruth Boyd was winner of first prize, Miss Elfreda Lloyd, sec- ond, while Miss Sparta Oasellini was consoled for her poor luck. Quantities of yellow fall flowers were used in the rooms to cany out a color scheme of yellow and white. A delicious dessert course was served late in the evening. The guests invited to share Miss Kienle's hospitality were Mrs. Leon- ard Dorman, Mrs. John Koester, the Misses Martha Statler, Audrey Dickhart, Sparta Casellinl, Edna Shane, Elfreda Lloyd, Thelma Metz, Ruth Boyd, Elizabeth Kienle and Miss Rose Weimer of Milwaukee, house guest of Mrs. Dormaii. Returned From Months Abroad Miss Marguerite Warnock last week resumed her position as an operator at the Ohio Bell Telephone company's office here after an ev- entful fifteen weeks absence, most of which time she spent abroad. Miss Warnock is a native of this country but went to Ireland to live when she was two years old and it was in KHlarney she remained for two months, visiting "riends. For two weeks she was in Ixmdon and was among the throng in Hyde Park when the attempted assassination of Edward Vrn took jlace in July. That day she had ;he privilege of seeing not only the Sing but also Queen Dowarger YTary, the Duke of Kent, Princess rforina and others of the Royal family. She visited the Tower of London, Buckingham Palace and saw the Crown Jewels. The weather, she said, was bitterly cold during the entire summer, so different 'rom what we experienced at home. She made both crossings on the SS Manhattan, the Olympic team being among the passengers on the SPECIAL Ladies Dresses BEAUTIFULLY CLEANED AND PRESSED (Any style except Velvet, Boucle, and more than 10 pleats) CASH AND CARRY ONE WEEK REAR KRESGE BLDG. PIQUA CARL ZEIGENFELDER, Manager PHONE 112 return trip. She also spent a brief time on the continent before re- turning to this country, where she has resided for 15 years. Before resuming her work in Pi- qua, Miss Warnock also visited the Exposition at Dallas, Texas, and spent some time in Michigan. Marriage Announced Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Cromer are announcing the marriage of their granddaughter, Miss Ethel Cree Miller, to Wallace E. Balllet of Lima, which took place Friday, October 9, at Bichmond, Ind. Rev. Mr. Croxall officiated at the cere- mony and the couple was attended by Miss' Rosemary Large of this city and William Ginn, Jr., of Ever- green, Ohio, cousin of the bride. The bride was becomingly attired in rust with a corsage of tea roses. Her attendant wore brown and a corsage of yellow flowers; The bride is a graduate of Cen- tral High school, class of 1934. Mr. Balliet graduated from Lima South' in 1933. The couple wffl make their home in Dayton where Mr. Balllet is em- ployed with the Equity Dairy com- pany. Woman's Gnild to Meet The Woman's Guild of Greene street M. E. church will meet Wed- nesday afternoon at o'clock at the church when Mrs. Philip P. Gates will have charge of special music and Miss Edith Brown, Mem- orial hospital technician, will be the speaker. Miss Lida Robinson will lead devotions. Miss Wilda Woodmancy and her group will serve refreshments. Planning For Dance The committee in charge of ar-J rangements is making extensive plans for the Daughters of Isabella Dance to be held Wednesday even- ing, October 28, at tihe Winter Oar- den. Harold Greenamyer and his or- chestra, so popular with Piqua peo- ple, will play for the dancing. Pro- ceeds will be turned over to the D. of I. Welfare Fund. Miss Zelma Kesting and .Mrs Raymond Barnhart are co-chair- men, and will be assisted by Mrs Virgil Collins and the Misses Mar- garet Decker, Margaret Henke Rosemary Dilworth, Catherine Birk Mildred Beckert and Alma Klopf. Bolssard-Vornbrock The single ring ceremony was read Saturday morning at half after eight o'clock at St. Boniface church by Rev. Father Trentman uniting in marriage Miss Clara Vornbrock daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Vornbrock of 746 Gordon street, anc Orrville Boissard, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Boissard of Russia Ohio. Miss Ma.ry Boissard and Homer Boissard of Russia, sister and bro- ther of the bridegroom, attendee the couple as bridesmaid and best man. Ushers were Paul Boissard, another brother of the bridegroom, and Ernest Vornbrock of Piqua, the bride's brother1. Miss Mary Boissard was lovely in a frock of psach taffeta wifih jaek- stts effect, with silver slippers and 'lead band. She carried en arm bouquet of pink roses matching her The bride was beautiful in white and lace, her finger tip veil of tulle was fastened against her In halo effect with tinv orange rsoms across the back. She car- ried a bride's bouquet of Easter Ill- lies. After the ceremony, 50 guests The woman who can wear this most modern Empire jown of rreen taffeta is sure to he the queen of the ball, for it will be royally admired by all. The wide skirt and the peplum. both corded with MI material, and the halter necklne are details that mark the crea- tion as oae of the. season's style were served an elaborate wedding breakfast at the home cf the bride- groom's parents in Russia. Mr. and Mrs. Boissard have es- tablished themselves to a home on West Second street, Dayton, where Mr. Boissard is employed by the Inland Manufacturing company. Mrs. Boissard formerly held a posi- tion as saleswoman with the G. C. Murphy store here. (Additional Society on Page Six) ERSQNALS Mrs. R. M. Curry returned Sat- urday to her home in McKeesport. Pa., after a visit with her sister, Mrs. L. D. Trowbridge, whose daugh- ter, Mrs. V. L. Anderson of Detroit, also left for her home after a week in Piqua. Mr. and Mrs. Milton Shanklin and Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ries of Massillon were week-end guests of Mrs. D. A. Shanklin and Mrs. Eliza- beth Koehnle of Cleveland street. Friends of Mrs. Jack Hill (Mil- dred Crones) will regret to learn that she is seriously ill at the Troy Stouder Memorial hospital follow- ing an' appendix operation from which complications have set in. Elmer Cordell returned Sunday evening from a week's visit with relatives in Muskegon, Mich., and Detroit. Prof. Ralph P. Beckert of Athens spent the week-end with his par- Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Beckert of Young street. Mr. and Mrs, H. L. McMaken and Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Routson were Piqua people attending the Ohio State-Pittsburgh game at Columbus Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Schneyer and the Hon. William MeCulloch were guests from Piqua at the Landon dinner Saturday night at Colum- bus. Mrs. Florence Bales, so 111 with an attack of influenza at her home on Harrison street, is forbidden visitors by her attending physician. Mr.' and Mrs. Clarence Merker and their six children of Cincinnati were week-end guests of Mrs. Elmer Peelle of Boone street. Mrs. Marker is Mrs. Peelle's sister. Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Schlosser of Home avenue have received word of the birth of a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. Paul Gade of Toledo. The baby, born October 1, has been named Gwendolyn. Mrs. Sophia Gade, formerly of Piqua and Mr. New Comfort for Those Who Wear False Teeth No longer need you feel uncom- fortable wearing false teeth. Pas- teeth, a greatly improved powder sprinkled on youi plates holds them tight and comfortable. No gummy, pasty taste or feeling. Deodorizes. Get Fasteeth at your druggist. Three ttUmtft te BA frmmtoother. Mr. and Mrs. Bchlocter re- ceived the cad news Saturday ot the death of Donald Ralph, infant con of Mr. and Mrs. John Cade, Jr., of Toledo, born Monday, October C. many friends of Joseph H. Barker, Jr., will be greatly relieved to learn that he li now convalesc- ing from a critical Illness of bron- chial pneumonia which has con- fined him for nearly two weeks to home on Broadway. Mrs. Maurice S. Wolfe, Mrs. Wil- liam s. Ramsey and Tom A. Ham- sey returned Sunday evening from Canada, where Mrs. Wolfe and Mrs. Ramsey have been occupying the former's lodge on her In Lake of the Woods, Ontario, for two weeks and Tom Ramsey has been since the latter part of July. Mr. and Mrs. Albert W. Bummers and small daughter, Luclnda, left Sunday for Solon, Ohio, where they will remain for an indefinite time. Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Allen of North Wayne street are happy to have with them their younger daughter and tiny granddaughter, Mrs. Mark A. Bradford and Mary Rose Bradford, who arrived Satur- day evening from their home in Nashville, Tenn., for an extended visit. Mrs. Bradford Is the former Mary Rose whose friends here are all so happy to see her. Dr. and Mrs. C. W. Lierman left Sunday for Columbus where Dr. Lierman is attending an optometric clinic at the Deshler-Wallick hotel. They will return home Wednes- day. (Additional Personals on Page Six) ARREST SIX BOYS UPON CHARGES OF BURGLARIES HERE Police near noon today arrested six young boys who upon question- Ing admitted burglaries of the Root Lumber company, the Piqua Milling company and other recent thefts including that at the Kiefer Drug store. The boys were all about 10 to 14 years-of age and after their appre- hension soon admitted their depre- dations. All were to be taken to Troy to appear in the juvenile court for hearing and judgment on their res- pective cases, Chief of Police Gehle indicated. STOCKHOLDERS TO RESUME CONTROL Columbus, O., Oct. 12, ernor Martin L. Davey announced today that control of three Day- iton building and loan associations would be returned to stockholders and ttaat control of two others would be given to directors, with state supervision. William. H. Kroeger, State Build- ing and Loan Superintendent, is to take steps Tuesday to put the Day- ton institutions under their new status. Application will be filed in Montgomery county common pleas court. GENERAL PUBLIC IS INVITED TO MEETING The general public as well as Re- publican partisans is invited to a Republican meeting to be conducted at the Park Avenue Baptist church on Tuesday night, Oct. 13 when Mrs. Cora Jordan White, brilliant Negro speaker will be heard, Mrs. White is described as being not only remarkably eloquent but a forceful and highly entertaining speaker. The rally session .will begin at eight o'clock. The most plausible reason for the numerous stones carried in the penguin's stomach is that, since he eats enormous amounts of fish, he needs assistance in grinding and di- gesting his meals. GARAGE VISITED BY A WOULD-BE THIEF What apparently vu another robbery attempt reported to police by Voder, Vine street. Voeler mid be found garage had been entered durlni the night by come one who left the ear headlights burning and the doori open on the vehicle. Be -aid noth- ing had been taken, however. Animals of the deer family, tucli as elk, moose and reindeer, have antlers, and shed them regularly. Cattle, buffalo, and antelope havi horns. NOW AT POPULAR PRICES! SHOW OF "SHOWS J STAIRIH f W WILLIAM POWELL M W MYRNA LOT MB fLUISE RAINER STAIRII! ILLIAM POWELL YRNA LOT RAINER CONTINUOUS TODAY TOMORROW PI QUA LAST TIMES TONIGHT STARTS TOMORROW PI Oil Amazing Adventure1. YOU'LL LAUGH.. YOU'LL CRY YOU'LL DREAM AT THIS STRANGE BARGAIN! "TWO IN A CROWD" WITH JOEL McCREA JOAN BENNETT ALISON SKIPWORTH HENRY ARMETTA REGINALD DENNY PLUS "MARCH OF TIME" NOVELTY AND NEWS THURSDAY BANK NIGHT Midnite Prevue Saturday FRED ASTAIRE GINGER ROGERS "SW1NGTIME" LAST TIMES TONIGHT Laughs! Thrills! Action! Also NEWS! COMEDY! CARTOON! Wittenberg College Extension Course: TROY, OHIO First Semester 1936-37 Opening Session Thursday, Oct. 15, 1936 at P. M. TROY HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING The COURSE 301 European Literature (Comparative Litera- A study of outstanding translations drama, poetry, and fiction chosen from various European literatures. Two hours credit. THE INSTRUCTOR Prof. John S. Irwin, A. M., Ph. D., Witten- berg College. All who plan to enroll should be present at the opening session. Visitors are welcome to attend the first lecture without obligation. WALL PAPER NO FINER SELECTION IN PIQUA! YOU WILL FIND NEWNESS SUPER VALUES WHEN YOU INSPECT OUR LINE. A harvest of harmonious colorings that pleases the eye and satisfies the needs for artistic, yet practical wall decorations. 200U N, MAIN. PHONE 227 R. L. Lenox "WE FRAME PICTURES"   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication