Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Massillon Item Newspaper Archive: September 10, 1897 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Massillon Item

Location: Massillon, Ohio

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Massillon Item (Newspaper) - September 10, 1897, Massillon, Ohio                                TEI ITEM PUBLISHIHG MMsilloa OMo Entered at tlie Massillou postollke as second class matter ADVERTISING RATES ON APPLICATION FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 10 POSTAL SAVINGS BANKS There seems to be a cryingdemand if not need for postal savings banks in this country to be under the direction of the postmaster general where small savings may be deposited with the feel ing of absolute safety In many coun tries postal savings banks are in suc cessful operation always with good re sults both to the depositor and to the government Amongthe advantages accruing to 4he people the following summary is 3 Absolute security from want Z Convenience of making deposits 3 Repayment not affected by change residence 4 Safety against personation and fraud Prevention of poverty or tempor ary want by developing habits of thrift ind saving fi Gives where no other banks ex ist a ready and safe deposit Discourages reckless and specula tive expenditures 8 Educates the young and uttrained 4o a knowledge of the use and value of money 9 To the young it also helps to give bookkeeping and business habits There ace also advantages on the part of the government which have been classified as folio wt 1 Prevents borrowing froai abroad 2 Places the money whether re garded as a loan or otherwise under the control of domestic legislation the country The people receive the profis in terest of their savings when such are used as a public investment 2 The increased wealth arising from deposits and accumulated inter est is kept within the country itself and not sent abroad to swell the wealth another country a By the wide distribution of re payments money thus invested can promptly reach points needing it sud denly from local causes 4 in remote places stringency from too limited ordinary bank facilities is prevented or lessened 5 The laboring people are taught to ieel a direct personal interest in the stability of the country 6 Sectionalism among the less in telligent classes is lessened and the welding or fusion of foreign eleuae nts promoted by such a common national institution 1 By special investment the peo ples savings might be made the foun dation of securities for certain other financial institutions of a trustworthy character or loans for municipal ire provemenfcs or special national undir takings The nations that have postal savings banks in successful operations are in part Austria Belgium France llus sia Canada Australia and nearly all the British colonies Hungary Japac Sweden etc There has just come to attention copy of a petition being circulated by 4he Chicago Record for the signature of persons desiring the establishment of postal savings banks The petition is addressed to the National Congress earnestly requests them to enact into law at its earlies opportunity a bill to carry forward the provisions as above outlined The bill is of great length and goes into the minutest de Jails The firsc section is as follows Be it enacted by the Senate and Mouse of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assem bled that in order to make the postof fice department available for th e pro tection of small savings with the pledge of the national goverment for the due payment of the same there is hereby established a postal savicgs bank tystem with a central and branch banks under the and supervision of the PostmasterGeneral There shall be established at the seat of government as a branch of the post office department a chief office to be known as the Central And the PostmasterGeneral is hereby au thorized to designate such mot cy or der as he may select for that purpose branch postal savings bank to receive tinall deposits and repay the same subject to regulations muuc by him in conformity with the provisions of this act The system provided for In this act shall be known as the Pon tal Savings Bank system and the moneys receive by transferred to or in way appertttiaiug to wud bMlt Postal Savings which moneys shall be deemed and taken to be public moneysand in the treasury of the Inited States COLO DEMOCRATS The state convention of Gold Demo crats at Columbus closed last night after adopting a platform and naming the folio wit g ticket Governor Julius Dexter Cincinnati Lieutenant Governor A E Merrill Cincinnati Supreme Cuurt Judge John Cleveland Attorney General Daniel Wilson Cincinnati Trtasuror Samuel Sieveus Colum bus School Commissioner Jl John son Granvilie Member Bjard of Public Works H G Cothnberry Cleveland The convention was a very small af fair hardly iifty delegates being pres ent What they lacked in numbers was made up in enthusiasm The hick ory tree was adopted as the emblem of the party and Hon Jos H Outhwaite of Columbus was endorsed for United senator THE Republican compaign will open Saturday night At Cincinnati the speakers will be ex Gov Charles Fos ter Senator J B Foraker and Senator Hanna SHOPPING EXCURSIONS A movement is being inaugurated and now taking definite shape in Pitts burg which promises to be fruitful of great result not only to the city of Pittsbuig as a trading center but to the country merchants in the territory con tiguous The movement is being di rected by the chamber of commerce and is called the Pittsburg Trade Ex tension It provides a series of shopping excursions from the towns and villages within trading distance of Pittsburg beginning Sep tember 27 and continuing for ten or tvelve days following to enable the country merchants to go to Pittsburg and do their fall shopping Excursion rates will be granted by tbe railroacs centering at Pittsburg circular letters will be sent out and reception and entertainment will be provided for all who avail themselves of the urgent invitation from the wholesale dealers of Pittsburg generously extended to them through the Chamber of Com merce In New York Cleveland and doubt less many other cities similar move ments are on foot and are proving of mutual advantage to both buyer and seler A somewhat similar enterprise was attempted in this city some years ago but for want of unity of action on the part of our merchants and proper ad vertising it did not prove the success that was intended There is a wide sweep of territory dotted with handsome villages of which Masstll m is the social and business center and all reasonable efforts should be put forth to receive and retain this trade for our city There may be a better way than a series of shopping excursions it does not present itself to us ITS THEIR WAY A Man Is Safe While Fllrtinic with Two Women They were coining in over one of the suburban electric lines when she turned suddenly toward him with flashing eyes Jim Flumley where did you get that necktie Bought No you didnt bought 1 can tell a store necktie as far as I can see it ThatshandJstitebedi and that Cupid on one end and them forgetmenots on the oUber end are worked in with silk Nice things to be puttingon a young neektie and you never got it over any counter Didnt say 1 bought it over a counter One of them fakes sold it to me at the Here Jim worked up an arti ficial cough and looked out across a waving cornfield Aha Jim Flumley Went to the circus did you And you told me mad you was because you had to work and couldnt take me and me believin you all the time Now sir who went with you to that show Jim squirmed looked sneaking and tried to explains Ill jest tell you how it was Nell Me and Jennie Tassler at a philopena and she caught me and asked me to take her to the circus How coulda feller get out of it Well sibe has I must say Why heres Jen and the car stopped to take on a buxoin girl who greeted the other two cheerily Hello she said as soon as sftie got her scat I see youre wearin Jim tried to look unconscious and cover the necktie but Nell was alert and said He told me he bought I like that declared Jennie sharply We ate a philopena he caught me 1 made him the tie and then he coaxed rm to go to the Jim red and perspiring saw that he was being surrounded by two angry women and hastily heat n retreat to the back seat After the few rigorous puffs necessary 10 pipe lie pulled his hat over iiis eyes humped up despondently in the corner andi was hoard to mutter unconsciously Dum a woman Free Press Misses Klingiinx calf school shoe 81 2f Snhr AXtpp South Eric stretit MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS CJofihen a disputed home race was decided by the revelation of camera Larue county it is said that Charles Williams has grown a bunch of white blackberries have been so thick around Idaho that it has been said that there was a bear for every bushel oldest house in Union built in and occupied always by same family has just been torn down Payne a negro of Bardstou n exhibited six tomatoes grown by him which together weighed 14 pouuds J Ingalls daughter stance ran an electric car in AtcJjJsun duringone eveningin place of the reg ular motorman county and Jiutler county creameries are making each pounds of butler aday and the county people are happy Hcusted 71 years old of Grand Blanc has taken to the bicycle with a vim and the other day rode 30 miles to make a visit C Reyes 83 years old and crippled cultivated a garden by her own labor at St Augustine and one day she picked from it a 30pound watermelon and SO pumpkins hoped that tbe m spider would destroy the water hya cinths in the St Johns river but the plants seem to grow faster than the can do away with them farm in Tennessee has been paid for wholly in hens eggs the installments being remitted daily sometimes at the rate of three cents a dozen for the eggs delivered in four dozen lots the longarctic nights there a constant difficulty in keeping awake tireely had to make very strict rules to keep his men awake during the lonu arctic nights Beds were not allowed to he made and the men were compelled to get up and move about London Lancet prints a long article on the therapeutical aspect of talking shouting singing la ugh in y crying sighinrj and All art said to have their hygienic uses Talk ingis pronounced a healthful occupa tion good ior heart disease and to some extenta substitute for bodily ex ercise WON AT LAST i BY HELEN BEEKMAN WHY SHE MARRIED HIM She Kiieiv Hiw FnultH a Dot But She for Him It was their first quarrel Well I dont see how I came to marry she snapped Same he returned Whatever 1 could see in she returned bitterly All men are the same as lovers but as husbands its dif ferent yon Oh ho all men are the same ns lovers Then yon had a lot of Thanks for your extraordinary candor I always thought you were a flirt but now you have spoken the words outof your own Out of my own mouth Can a per son speak with some one elses mouth you ninny Why dont you try to be logical as well as insulting I suppose its too much to expect from one whose brains are in his mustache or in his clothes or in his pretty feet Oh dont whine I know your faults to a Well since you he added 1 will be frank with you and say that I mar ried you to give you tbe opporttinity to tell me my faults so that I could in time approach your own angelic stand ard of Indeed and I married you because you were such expert at repairing a bicycle tire Dont you remember how you carried your jiffy outfit around with you You were so expert Yon used to tell me you because you loved What a silly answer that was Then you are a liar too eh I say I married you because yon were such an expert tire repairer When I quit ridiugthe bicycle Ill have no more use for you do you hear Go out the shed and clean my wheel and let me hear no in ore out of yon for a week NewsTribune He Clinrltnlle Hasty judgment of the actions of others is dangerous and often unjust We measure too much by some super ficial appearance and condemn hastily when if we knew all and understood the motives and reasons we would warmly approve We sometimes say of some one This pain sorrow or loss has not deeply affected But we do not know It is like the death of a few of the soldiers in front of a regiment The broken ranks close up again into the solid phalanx and the loss is not apparent There may be no disorganization no surrender no craving ior pity no display of despair It is like the calm dazzling play of the waves warmed by the morning sun aft er a night of storm and disaster There is no sign of the wreck the tide has carried The debris away far out on the ocean the treacherous water has swal lowed all signs and tokens of the nights awful work We see only the fairness of the morning not the sufferingof the night Let us be charitable in our judgment and condemn not when we do not Free Press Jlronil Snuor Put into a double boiler two gener ous cups of milk and place it over tho fire add onefourth of an onion ami one cup of finely sifted bread crumb cover the boiler and let the ingredients simmer 20 minutes Take out the onion and add n tablespoonful of but ter and season with salt and a liny pintill of mace The sauce is then ready to serve Hrowu some bread crumbs in molted butter and sprinkle ihcin over thr when this samv is snvcd in a Fcpnvair dish but if the sauce is potuvd around the birds scat ter IhiN browned crumbs over the of the rnuor ns wrll as the 1or irb IT WAS a lovely picture of rolling woodland and grassy slopes with the peaceful river in the distance re flecting the glories of the dying sun and the rich masses of cloud tinged with myriad rainbow dyes hut before IJeJJ Fieldings eyes a mist of tears inter vened None on the jetty lashes no them was left ou the fair Hushed cheek but they blurred tha vision for all that as she choked them back on heart Around her was every evidence of wealth The house ris ing in the background n grand old pile of gray stone worthy the name of castle the grounds surrounding it kept in ex quisite order giving every sigii of culti vation and taste her own dress rich and cosily yet the tears so nearly shed were caused by the bitterness of dependence It wais her uncles house she shared the privileges which by right belonged solely to her cousin her beautiful cous iii and beautiful the idol of her father e man stern and grave save to the daughter whose smile melt ed the chilliest frost in which he en wrapped himself Years before Bell too had known a fathers love but that Archer Fielding had ever been own brother to this man of iron seemed impossible Her earliest recollections were of a bright genial nature eyes and lips formed only for laughter forbidding concealment and distrust a heart always ready to listen to her childish wants ever open to en fold and protect her then silence and mystery His name was never men tioned now in her uncles home She had been taught to think him dead though sometimes rose a great hope in her soul that somewhere on this wide earth he might yet live and the day would come when she might find him She could complain of no unkinclness I will go she said aloud i cannot bear it lam young strong I can work or if needs be thing rather than accept or a whole by stern du ty without one sweetmorsel of Soliloquizing Miss Bell interrupt ed a voice and the girl turned her face flushing1 then paling ms theyoungman who had thus addressed her approached and drew her arm within his For a mo ment she let it rest there as though it were pleasant to her then made a mo tion to withdraw it but he laid a de taining grasp on the small white fin gers as he questioned Why will you not accept my escort Is your own so ciety so far preferable My cousin is expecting you I be lieve Mr Armstrong at the house May floes not brook Indeed Nor do I therefore since I was seeking jou allow me at least a brief reward I was not aware Miss Fielding had any claim upon my time at least notMdssMay Fielding Agmii his listeners face flushed as she made a half impatient movement of dissent he went on with sudden im petuous manner is it possible you do not know the abaran which has drawn mehere HaveyounotlongBgo story of my love for jou It is true I have been polite to your cousin although my attentions have hardly been so marked as to admit of miscon struction Think you we care for the snowcapped mountains when at our very feet lies the valley of plenty Through her I have gained speech with you Surely such subterfuge is in no way to be despised I have seen your proud spirit suffer have known some thing of its pangs Darling Avill you not end them Wrill you not accept the home I offer you as fair a one as that you leave where you shall reign its honored mistress queen of all even my heart Was she dreaming Was it indeed love lor Loring Armstrong she so long had held within such irrepressible bar riers that now at his words leaped in such mad strong currents through every pulse She so long had looked upon him as Mays lover she so well knew his declaration had been expected by her which would gratify for her father every desire of his parental am bition so fully realized their baffled dis appointment when they discovered it was she whom he her brain whirled but those last words she whom he gave her strength What could she not bear for such a price Had Loring Armstrong been penniless she still could have gladly gone forth to the endsof the world and now now she could only raise happy tearbedimmed eyes to his and sob out her newfound joy on the unexpected shelter of his heart But May What will she say she questioned at last Darling do you think because I have been so happy as to win you every one must envy you the prize I doubtif Miss May has a heaft save when it beats triumphantly as she looks at the reflec tion of her own beautiful face in her mirror But come little trembler We will go and announce our daWningbliss and put your foolish fears to So saying he threw his arms once more about the slender form and drew her toward The house On the broad piazza impatiently opening and closing the fan she held within her jeweled hand the beautiful heiress pat awaiting their approach or rather the approach of one alone for she raised her penciled eyebrows with hisughty inquiry accompanied by n dis dainful shrug of the graceful shoulders when she saw who was his companion but as they drew n rarer and slio noited the action of acknowledged protection n pallor overspread ihe brnuti fill face and one drop of blood rosud on the crimson lip wlurr lirr small while had its rrnrl impress have come to your congraHu May although I luive ns sured your cousin how sincere 1 know 11103will bo your father within No 1 believe not and witkout content of ones guaixJiau congratula tions i infer are premature However you may rest assured of mine if you them of luc itoue iu which she spoke gave no betrayal of the conflict she endured and at the words JLtell started forward How kind of you dear cousin to share luy but a something unnoticed by the mail warned her to suy uo draw back chilled she could scarce tdl why and send the mo mentary impulse of affection backtoits fountainhead A shadow of undefined dread crept over her not even her lov ers kiss with his promise to return early in themorning that the important interview might be accomplished could dissipate a shadow which took visible form as on the following day she was jiuiumoued from the breakfast room to her uncles study aud met her cousin just leaving it with an expression oi triumphant assurance she was unable to conceal With unusual urbanity after careful ly closing the door Mr Fielding mo tioned her to a seat I he began clearing his throat that Mr Armstrong has asked you to become his wife This both amazes and pains me Amazed because you certain ly must have conducted your courtship with unbecoming secrecy and pained because it forces me into disclosures which will make this marriage an im The shadow had fallen now She felt it suffocating her but she awaited the rest in silence Had your hand been sought by one whose name was of less lustre and whose birth station and immense wealth forced him to less necessarily maintain it I might have kept silent Now I cannot consistently do so there fore I must tell you your father is not dead as you aave supposed but still lives a fugitive from justice Lives My father Thank God From her white lips broke the exclama tion of gratitude unheeding the barrier which had forbidden all these years his acknowledging himself to his child I will not here speak of the character oi his offense save thatthe clemency of one man saved him from he continued restlessly pacing the floor as though even his hard nature shrank from his selfappointed task His eyes were glancing over at the white suffer ingface of the girlhe was stabbing with each word it only remains for me to apprise Mr Armstrong of these facts to induce him at once to renounce your hand of his own accord or in mercy to your pride inform him you repented a too hasty decision and wish to be free Which course will you choose Sir your blood is in my veins The question is therefore scarcely neces sary 1 shall never see Loring Arm strong again Word it as you will only if it be true that my father lives I would share his exile aye if needs be his disgrace Write him itis my wish and gain quickly his No letter could reach him As soon as possible I will let him know of your Slowly Bell rose and left the room wondering if years had not elapsed since last she had catered it A dull wonder took possession of her in the weeks that followed as to why her lover EO calmly had accepted her sudden re jection of his suit She did not know a faint hope had tempered the first force of the blow the hope that he would break down any barrier leap any ob stacle which might prevent his claim ing her for his own But since the few brief hours they had spent together when he had won her promise he had vanished Not even Mays wiles coulft draw him to her side since he had dis appeared from their midst So sit ting alone and weary she was startled one evening as the first snow lay upon the ground by the entrance of a stran ger Gray hairs mingled with the brown but as he stood silent one mo ment before her a thrill of expectation gave her a premonition of the future and when he opened his arms with the talismanic words My she sprang to their embrace Bnt as he re leased her another stood waiting as Loring Armstrong said Have I won my reward Bell Glancing for one moment into the noble features of the parent siie had lost so long and failing to read one sign which should proclaim him capable of wrong she could no longer hesitate as with rapturous bliss she felt herself Mice more enfolded in her lovers arms Nav did he let her go when her uncle was summoned to their presence so changed so white so fearstricken that she could but feel a thrill of pity at her heart a pity which made her piead his cause when the sad truth was unfolded the truth that to save him her own father had assumed his crime the forgery of a note True to a promise marie to his mother on her deathbed to protect a younger brother he had gone forth a wanderer leaving home and his the guilty one Loring Armstrong insisting upon the issue had been reluctantly told and he it was who determined to win the girl he loved at any cost had sought and found the father who had sacrificed so much and from whose lips sealed so long he wrung at last the truth Yon have a confessed the wretched man when all had been told restored to your arms Hemember I did this for mine and forgive So it was the heiress after nil Loring Armstrong had won for his bride and on the eve of Bells wedding clay May Fieldings body was discovered boantifnl and white and cold in death and her uncle Irft his home a wretched wanderer unwilling to accept the free foricrivenoss offered him hor husband wilnnl away her tears and in his and her newfound fathers love she learned the lesson that While sorrow lasts for the night joy eorneth in the Y Oxford tit a chocolate color ui einiji Kcrular price Suhr A South Erie street Ask for the M LAB when making a purchase By doing so yoAi will prove yourself a true UNIONIST and friend of Organized Labor The label should be in your COAT HAT PANTS SHOES and on your CIGARBOX PAPER BEERKEG TOBACCO and PRINTING 1   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication