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   Independent, The (Newspaper) - October 26, 1896, Massillon, Ohio                                ISSUED SEMI-WEEKLY. MASSILLON, OHIO MONDAY OCTOBER 26, 1896. XXXV-NO. 32 MASSILLON'S NIGHT. A Splendid Reception at Major McKinley's. GREAT ENTHUSIASM SHOWN. The Marching Cltthg from Massillon Halt Before the Address Full of Fatherly Fine Appearance of the Clubi Everywhere Spoken CANTON, Oct. all the delega- tions that have visited Major McKinley, not one has marched up the Market street hill with the precision of the Young Men's Sound Money Club and the Massillon Colored Men's McKinley Club. These two organizations, brilliantly uni- formed, and ably captained, with spir- ited drum corps, aud enthusiasm that broke loose in the presence of the Major, arrived about 8' o'clock Wednesday evening. They were expected. The arch of electric lights in the speaking stand was turned on, and Mrs. McKin- ley honored the occasion with her pres- ence. Several thousand Cantonians filled the stre.t and adjoining yards, and the campaign troops from Massilion were cheered as they fell into position with the ease and dexterity of long drilled military men P esident T. Harvey Smith acted as spokesman, delivering the following preliminary remarks: "Major chairman of the Young Men's Sound Money Harch ing Club of Massillon, I have the honor in behalf of its members and of many citizens of our city to express to you their greeting aud good will and to you their earnest and vigorous support at the coming election. 'To the Republicans of Massillon your name has become a household word. We know mncn of your history, both as a citizen and as a public official. We have learned to love and respect you for your dignifi d and upright manhood, for your pure and devoted home life, and your unimpeachable and brilliant record as a statesman. Alth >UKh we feel a just and a pardonable pride in having in our own county, as one of our own neigh bors, a citizen whom the members of a great political party with one accord have called to be a candidate for the highest office in the of any people, our interest in your success is not prompted by loca' pride mwreJy; we have material interests at stake; our industrial wealth is very great; our quarries of fine building stone are almost inexhaustible; and the rich agricultural district rounding us. much of which is under- laid with thick veins of excellent coal, is unsurpassed for fertility and product- iveness "Under the wise legislation proposed and championed by yourself in the ad ministration of President Harrison, our shops and factories afforded steady em- ployment at good wages to hundreds of workiugmen now idle With our shops and factories running at full time, the farmers of the neighborhood found ready sale for all their surplus products, where now the are sluggish and over stocked. Is it not in accordance with the nature of things that the hundreds pros ent this evening from our city saonM wish for a return of the prosperity en- joyed from 1888 to 1892? "We are not of the number who be lieve that prosperity will return if we call fifty three cents worth of silver one dollar; our present dollar is satisfactory We are concerned more in the questions that pertaiu to getting possession of it We believe that the first step toward bet- ter times is your elevation to the office of President 01 the United States; with that will come the restoration of busi aess confidence, followed by a pourmf into the arteries of trade of the million! of money now idle, afraid of unsafe and uncertain investment. These couditio >s with legislation in harmony with your own views, following a period of four years of depression, will result, we lieve, in an era of good e'-ing prosperity unparalleled in the history ot our country. "In t iis faith we come wishing you God speed aud pledging you our loyftl support. Members of the March- ing Club and citizens of Massillon, I have the honor to present to yon the next President of the United States." With long and hearty cheers on every side of him, Major McKinley stepped forward, and with manifestations of earnestness and personal interest, de livered his last and best speech of the day, as follows: "My fellow is peculiarly j gratifying to me to have the young men i of Massillon, representing two make this call upon me tonigat; and I am glad to have the assurance that in the pending content your votes will be given for the great Republican party, which stands for what is good in govern- ment and is noble in the American name. Massillon has always been very dear to me Although a citizen of Can- ton, I have always felt the deepest in terest aud had tbe do est relations with our neighboring city, and I recall; tonight, as memory sweeps like a{ mighty current (hat among my earliest public trusts. I am indebted to some of the old Republicans of Massillon, for having first announce d aud supported my candidacy. (Applause.) I suppose there is scarcely a young man in this Sound Money Club that I have not known from earliest manhoood. One young man told me tonight that the first time he had ever attended a political meeting he was a lad of six years and was taken by his father to a meeting in Massillon which I addressed. He is a voter today, else waits upon you. I do not like the doctrine of classes and caste- in this country. "I would rather preach the gospel of hope, than of despair. I bid my fellow countrymen lookup, rather than give up. Continued cheering I would rather counsel them with encouragement than with discouragement. We have dis- couragements enough without being told of them all the time; (Laughter and great applause) and while discouragements are sometimes hard to bear, yet the high- spirited, mettled young man is only spurred to greater activity by them. I am glad to know that you have enlisted n the ranks of the Republican party It is a party that inspires the noblest en- deavor in public as well as in private affairs; and it is to the glory of our institutions that we recognize no sections, no nationalities, no classes, no colors; but men of all nationalities and all colors are equal citizens in this great free Republic of ours. (Tremendous applause I thank you for this call. I congratulate you upon your splendid ap- pearance, and I hope you will come over to Canton and see us very often, as I may probably be prevented from coming to see yon this year as has been my cus- tom for so many years in the past. 1 thank you and bid yon good night." (Three cheers were then enthusiastically given MAYOR'S TALK He Tells a Tale to Massillon Populists. AND A STRANGE TALE IT IS. n J. J. Grant and Edward Welsch Speak at Newman. OLD TIMERS IN LIME The Newman Coriesponrit-M Oifurn Some lutoroHitnfC Comments on the Mininjj Sit- 45 Cent Proposl'.to K< jected By Very Large Majority. NEWMAN, Oct. J. Grant and Edward Welsch, of Canton, addressed the largest political meeting our village has had si ice the days when Major Mo young men; they are ever an inspira- tion to me. The whole future is before them. There is nothing which they oan ,Kmley accommodated us with one of his masterly speeches. Our school house was crowded with f nthusiastio citizens, and both gentlemen delivered able ad- dresses, and no doubt did considerable good. We were highly pleased to notice quite a number of old timo Republicans present who had drifted away from the old party and affiliated with the Popu- Hstic fallacy. We are glad to see thorn return to their first love. A good sized attended from Canal Fulton, bringing with them their celebrated glee club, whica took the entire andi ence by storm. Oar prediction that the miners would reject the -45 cents per ton rate, has been verified by the popular vote, giving a majority of 7 to 1, the advice of our offi- cials to the contrary notwithstanding. But few miners of the Massillon district voted, for the reason that they do not be long to the organization. Had their votes been counted the majority against the 45 cent rate would have been largely increased. The miners have taken the case in their own hands, and our officials have signified their willingness to carry out their instructions; so the rumor com- ing from Cleveland that a miners' mass meeting is to be hold to reconsider their vote, at the request of the officials, is all bosh. And when the price of mining is to be less than 61 cents per ton, the mi ners are the proper parties to be notified, and the reasons therefor. DISCIPLES OF WALTON. BOLIVAR, Oct. four men fishing in the river, north of town It is rumored that they are all famous Mas sillonians, namely, Dr. D. S. Gardner, City Treasurer W. B. Martin, Dr. T. C Miller and J. C. Corns, but the report has not been verified. The rapidity with which these sportsmen are robbing the old Tnsoarawas of its inhabitants is alarming, and citizens fear the utter ex termination of the local finny tribe. FROM CRYSTAL SPRING. CRYSTAL SPRING, Oct. Herman and Miss (Delia Heinbnch were united in marriage, Tuesday afternoon at 6 o'clock, in the St. John's church, at Massillon, the Rev. J. ;E. Digel official ing. After the ceremony the happy i couple was driven to the pleasant farm home of the bride's parents, where j bounteous supper was served. The house was beautifully decorated with I potted plants. A large number of friends were present. The presents received were both numerous and costly. They will make their future home in their new residence, north of town. We wish them joy and prosperity in their journey through Hfe...McClintock Atkinson's fun makers are booked for a week's en gagenient at Leonard's opera hall, be ginning October 26. From reports they give a very good show. SONGSTERS FOR M'KINLEY. EAST GRKENVILLE, Oct. Mo Kinley and Hobart Glee club has been organized here by Messrs. Richard Price and Samnel Evans, two of tbe best vo calists in the county, and will make its first appearance at the political meetini at Beech Grove tonight. It is composed of sixteen members. WEST BROOKFIELD NEWS. WEST BROOKFIELD, Oct. 24 con- cert will be given in the M. E. church, on Wednesday evening, Oct. 28, for the benefit of the Epworth League. L. L MoConnell is moving into the John Jones property. Mrs. Mary Peasly has beei with her mother, Clarenoe Smith and Hanrey and unsullied life. I Miller each spent a few days in this There is nothing on. vicinity thtsweek.__________ so much as a pure (Great this earth that will serve yon so well M Wright's Celery Tea euros constipation a good name; 700 have that, all 8icic headache. 27c at druggists. Mrs. Shvrwood Mr. Bryan's Picture Wlih the A. Rice Tells All He Knows About Large Au- dience Present to Hear Him. The silver meeting conducted by the ocsl Democrats and Populists last night was a quiet affair. Though the opera house was crowded there was lack of en- husiasm. There was neither club nor band to greet the speaker, James A. Rice, of Canton, on his arrival, and that gentleman made his way to the hall vir- mally unattended. He was accom- panied from Canton by Mrs. Rice, Mrs. R. Sherwood and several other ladies, and therefore the chairs upon the stage were assigned to them and the Young Ladies' Bryan Club, of this city. The latter sang and were heartily applauded. Mrs. Sherwood waited until the audi- ence was seated and then proceeded to drape a flag about Mr. Bryan's picture to the delight of the multitude. E. S. Howells, chairman of the meet- ing, introduced Mr. Rice with a brief speech, thanking the local Democrats ana the committee for the honor con- ferred by his appointment. Of Mr. Rice, Chairman Ho wells said he was young in years but old in experience; a man who has, without a blemish, ad- ministered the affairs of the largest city in Stark county. Mr. Rice arose amid a itorm of applause and called upon the people in the rear of the hall to take front teats as "I intend to divulge some open secrets." Without delay the speaker began and the following are paragraphs taken from time to time from tiis address: I will not said Mr. Rice, "but will at once turn my attention to the is- sues of this campaign. Have yon ever known in any campaign of the past, any great party to resort to measure! and circulate such ridiculous falsehoods as have the gold standard advocates? Have voa ever known a party to resort to suoh nonsense? But what more can yon ex- pect; with the tidal wave that has turned toward them during the past few weeks they should be driven to desperation. It is folly for this party to endeavor to sep- arate the two standard metals, gold and silver, and never until this fall did any political party dare to loosen iti hold on silver, and that party, excuse me for speaking of a dead thing, is the National Democratic party. Does not the St. Louis platform favor bi metallism? In they say I am too young to talk money, but the truth from an in- fant is better, it seems to me, than re- versed statements from the old and ex- perienced There are many queer things to be answered by the gold standard people if they dire speak. Yon have heard Mo Kiuley and others from this very plat- form speak for both gold and siiVer. Now why the change? Now, my fellow citizens, (referring to the Republicans in the hall) why have yon changed? Be- cause they flay support u single gold standard, or do you stand by your pnn ciples of the past, upheld by your leaders then." Here Mr. Rice grew peculiarly funny on the subject of McKinley, Hanna, their "free and their "antics upon a gold plank Referring to Major McKinley Mr. Rice said: "Whatever Hanna, of Cleve- land says, we have a small voice in Can- ton which says, 'Mr, too, Mark.' "Just the other continued Mr. Rice, '-I talked with a man who said: 'I don't like Bryan; be is a tool in the hands of the silver mine owners and was receiving- from them a year to lee tnre for silver I asked for his author- ity and be said, fhnrston and the Cleveland Leader The it will lie, beg or steal, just as Hanna die tates. Yon say that Bryan gets from the silver said I. "Now, will you admit that it will cost the Ra publican party during this campaign? The fellow said no, but finally admitted that the party had ex- pended fully 000 during the past three months: yet Bryan is a tool. Of course they can mine gold with tools This would pay Bryan for speaking for silver for 1.000 years. "Now whas caused McKinley to change body and sou1 for gold? Now in 1890 did ae not favor silver', He said, "I am for the largest use of silver in the currency of the country; give it equal credit with gold. I want the doub.e standard.' Why has McKinley made this change He taught nt that silver have its place alongside of gold. We have all admired McKinley as a pub- lic man, but has he told yoo. why he has changed so materially in his views that not enough to make any man think, who has to toil for his daily bread Yon will be sorry when it is too late to act At Toledo, in 1891, McKin- ley assailed most discriminatingly Gro ver Cleveland for assailing silver. Today they ask yon to support the policy they denounced Cleveland and party for adopting. I knew Grover Cleveland was a big man, but I did not think he could succeed in drawing the entire Republi- can party to his way of thinking. "Now, referring to are the patriots? Surely not these men in Wall street, who, during the late war, forced Abraham Lincoln to carry on the rebellion on paper money. Why, when ne aiked them to give back the gold for furtherance of the cause they said, 'Cer- tainly we and asked 36 per oent. for the loan. Talk of aristocracy in this country. We have but one class of aris- tocracy, that of virtue and intelligence Would an aristocracy of Hanna's be like And ranch of the same sort. Mayor Rice took pains to correct a statement credited to him in Canton, by which he encouraged lawlessness in order to secure a livelihood through the workhov.se. According to Mr. Kioo's explanation it was a case of making a mountain out of an ant hill. He ad- mitted that he did say to several men, "Come before me and I will send yon to the but he intended the remark for a jest The affair oame about on the day of the issue of McKin- ley's leltar of acceptance. Mayor Rice passed a squad of men and they said, re- ferring to MoKinley's letter, "This is what we want; we want work The Mayor remarked that if that was what they wanted, to manage in some way to oome before him and they would get it. The Mayor may not have been sincere, but it is rather below the dignity of the chief official of a corporation to make an asoertion of this kind. It is but one of many unbecoming remarks made by Mr. Rioe. Mr. Rice closed his speech by saying that W. J. Bryan's nomination was not alone the act of man. God, he claimed, had furnished the inspiration. Mr. Rice referred many times to his incum- bency as mayor of Canton, stating that in his campaigns he had never passed the workingman by, nor had he ever re trained from grasping him by the hand in the most friendly manner. Special Police Appointed to Pre- vent Disturbance. THE LATE NEWS BY WIRE. AT Another Day of Many Speeches for Major McKinley. WHAT THE DELEGATIONS BRING. Bryan Gold in Arraiguinrnt of Bin Failure at Cleveland In Which of Dal- lara are stage Held up. IBy Associated Press to THK INDEPENDKNT BOWLINU GREEN, Oct. nary measures have been taken to pre- vent disturbance or indignity to Secre- tary Carlisle. Mayor Mallery appointed a large number of special policemen, who are to stand in different parts of the house and use vigorous methods with any disturbing element. The city never had such a crowd as came today All are anxious to ehow the secretary the high esteem in whi h he is held in southern Kentucky. Many called to see him at tne hotel. The free silver Democrat can didate for Congress has abandoned his intention of a division of time, but will answer the secretary after he is through. Mr. Carlisle was presented by Wells Cov- ington. At I p. m. he was given an ovation and began his speech shortly after. There was no disturbance. LOOK OUT FOR TROUBLE- An Accident at the Tabernacle Some of Thene CANTON, Oct. Canton has a board of building inspectors, like Massil- Ion, they should get to work on the Tabernacle. The onher night a large audience assembled to hear Mrs Helen Gougar Sue had scarcely spoken ten minutes wnen a crash occurred, and the north gallery was seen to settle under its weight of human be ngs. The audience was preoeptibiy affected, and was about to make a rash for the doors, when Mrs. Sherwood, with ready tact, arose from her seat and b gan to siug the stir ring old song "America." The andi ence at once took up the refrain, and a panio was averted and order finally re stored. An investigation showed that one of the posts that sut ported the gallery had sunk into the floor to the depth of five or six inches, thereby allowing gal lery to settle to that extent. In 1890 while James G-. Blame was speaking to an immense audience, a similar crack occurred, and a panio averted by the prompt and cool headed work of Blaine and Major McKinley. Some of these days those pillars may settle again, and the crowd may be less easily controlled, la snob an event would be lost. NORWALK MARRIAGES. Oopld Belnc Kept Very In That City. NORWALK, Oct. Barter, for- merly a druggist in thii city, was mar last nigLt to Miss Georgie Smith, daughter of W. O S nuh Edward Chne, of Kentoa, was married last night to Miss Jlary Clapp, of this city Will McCn'lis and Miss Jessie Chaffe. both were married Wednes- day moruiug. Bnrt W. Welsh and Miss May ing, of Clarksville, were married here on Tuesday. CAPTURED IN MASSILLON. J, Who Kflcaped from Canton OfflcTn, Located Here CANTON, Oct. Warren, who has conducted a questionable dancing show in North Market street, was re-arrested yesterday, by order of Proseonting At torney Bow. Warren had been warned to discontinue the vulg.tr performance, and did close the place, bat for only a day. He managed to slip out of Justice Robertson's office, Friday afternoon, and escaped to Massillon. Mrs. Warren fol- lowed, but was shadowed by Constable Kramlauf and Deputy Sheriff Stone. Warren was soon located and returned to Canton. IN PROBATE COURT. Daniel H. MoFarren, a Sugar Creek township farmer, has assigned to Wm H. Shatter. The assets are estimated at and the liabilities at The will ot George Machamer, of Lake township, has been filed for probate. Gustavo Gesswein has been appointee administrator ot the estate of Mary Ann Dore, of Canton. The Campaign Too Mneh for Pretty Nearly Everybody Actively Connected with It Except the Major Contin' as Bright and Strong Ever. CANTON, Oct. week ago it looked as though the season of busy Sat- urdays was over, but delegation after delegation has since been entered on Captain Heist and'B assignment book, and this day promises to make demands upon Major McKinley almost as numerous as last Saturday. The way the Major bears up under the rtrain is something mar- vellous. As the end of the campaign draws near he seems to absorb new strength, and spirits, and infuses the latter into all about him. Though the central figure in this work he stands the pressure better than any of assistants Weeks ago Private Secre. ary Boyle had to go off for ten days to recuperate. Private Stenographer Cooper is under the weather, and H. H. Kohlsaat, of Chicago, has sent on bis secretary to do ubstieute duty for a while. Samuel Baxton is at home pretty thoroughly used up, and every body else is iepc tne Major. Nearly every delegation brings some ubitantial tribute for the McKinley lousehold. This week presents of batter, trawbernes, squashes, and red apples have been added to the family larder. A Kansas admirer sent a cannon made if corn cobs, a down east friend sent a big gold bug. Two chairs turned up, nd a table decorated with cancelled xjdtage stamps to resemble mosaic work. Then there was a silver statuette, a beautiful mirror, and a packing case fl.ll- id with cough drops and heaven knows what else As everybody has observed, the MoKln- ey "lawn" is now as buld as an egg. Scores of curious people ojnstantly hover about the windows, and thereby hangs tale. The other evening, after dark, the Major having finished iis day's speech making, left the library and walked into the parlor, on the other ide of the house. Here he in supposed co enjoy strict privacy, and the curtains are commonly drawn. On this psrtiou- nr evening they weren't, but the Major did noc know ic. He was in fine humor, and closing the door, cracked his heel.s ether, and sat down to the piano, where he played the few chorda that most people do not know are at his com maud. The dignified ex-governor could not see that he was being observed, and laving finished his musical flourish, was to hear round after round of cheering, proceeding from every window, vrlv.-re curious crowds had gathered. Shocked being found at play, the Major ran to cover, and now the stranger is pretty sure to find the cur- tains attended to every evening. Oue of the first viiitors at the house this morning was Charles Emory Smith, edito. of the Philadelphia Press, aiid formerly minister to Russia He has come in from a speaking tour and is feel ing very aaugnine over the prospects. Delegations began to arrive at 5 o'clock in the morning. There were 400 in the first party from Lebanon and Berks county, Pa. They waited until 9 o'clock before marchi.ig up. and were presented by ex-Mayor J. R Kinney, of Reading Pa., and J. Victor Smith, of Lebanon county. Many Democrats were in the first party, and heard the speech with enthusiasm. Second amne the 300 members of the Hardwood Lumber Exchange and the Builders' and Traders' Exchange, of Chicago. Harvey S. Hayden spoke for them and the Major was at his best in responding. The third speech at 10 o'clock was heard by a large crowd from Elmira, Corning, Bath. Cuba, and Jamestown, N. Y. These people were wild with enthusiasm, and lift the yard with reluctance. STORY OF A BRAVE MAN. Phllo a Native of fltark County, and Honorable Record. Philo Bruce died at his home in Ra- venna on Saturday. He was born la Stark county in 1844 and leaves behind him a much honored reputation His war record is particularly interesting. He r as one of the few men in the United States who received a pension of a month, which he certainly deserved, for at the siege of Knoxville he was literally shot to pieces. A shell took off his left arm near the elbow, his left leg, the call of his right leg, and a part of his left side. He was carried home on a pillow, and nursed back to life by a faithful sister. He served several times as ty recorder and was a most successful and expert one-armed hunter and marks- man. He will receive a regulation mili- tary burial. Hon. Harvey Wells fell from a second story window of his residence at Wells- ton, breaking his right leg above the knee, his left arm twice, and otherwise badly injuring him He had been sick for some time and was delirious. Samuel Hart, a Portsmouth farmer, was fatallv injured by being thrown from his buggy down a fifty foot em- bankment. Henry Tibbe, a wealthy citizen of Washington, Mo., aged 77years, is dead. He was the inventor and patentee of the now world famed "Missouri Meer- schaum" corn cob pipe. In the Kinsas State Reform school, is a 12-j'ear-oid incorrigible, Alonzo Hart, jr., whom his parents, alter foar years )f trouble, were obliged to spnd away. The youthful Alonzo robbed houses, stons and stole hordes He began his criminal career at the age of eight, and only shortly out of dresses; his first es- apade bamg the stealing of all the Dibles, prayer books and hymnals from, a church. THROWN FROM A WAGON- Mr. and Uaulrl It.hr Mert With an A rldnm. Daniel Rohr and wife, who reside in Jackson township, were driving east on Tremont street, in a spring w gon, Fri day evening, about four o'clock. At the inters- ction of Tremont and Erie streets a force of men were placing some wires in position. A heavy wire was hanging across Tremont street not more than six feet above the ground It is said that the workingmen yelled to Mr. Rohr to stop when they saw that he intended to pass that way but if they did he did not hear them. The passed under the wire which struck Mr. and Mrs Rohr with such force as to throw both from the wagon. They were carried into ihn Sailer Hotel and Dr. Dimon wits summoned. Neitaer were seriously injured, though both were badly shaken up Mr Rohr is about eighry-five years old. It was at first th mght that his skull was frac tnred, but the injury proved to be only a scalp wound, .vlr. and Mrs Rohr were taken to their home in Willaman's am- bnlauce. Lecture Course. Oct. 28, the Rev. Dixon, jr., "The New Nov. 30. John P. D. John, D. D "Did (rod Make Man or Did Man Make Dec. 28, Prof John B. DeMotte, "The Harp of the Senses or the Secret of Character Build- illustrated with stereoptioon views, Jan. 22, Ariel Ladies' Sextette, (Smith Feb. 0, George R. Wendling, "Unseen March 13, Alexander Black, "A Capital Court TIME AND NICKELS. Former the Latter anrl Hr. Shnfwll In Keady. Edward Shufelt's glorious scheme and avowed intention of mounting a store x on the public square some afternoon and showering upon the tumultuous crowd which he is positive will at once SUIT rand him, handful after handful of five cent pieces, and by the resultant tcraoib e to illustrate the effect of tree silver on the cjuntry, lacks but two thiugs for its consummation. The first of tliese is the afternoon. Any after- noon will not do, but it mast be one when the streets we crowded. Then again Mr Shafelt, while he modestly admits of being the author' of the plan, is of the opinion tnat some of the thousands of itopubhoauH who are wait ing for an opportunity to do something for their country should not be denied this uhanod to show their devotion, but should be allowed to take it upon ihem- selvus to sue that the nickels are not liK-kitig on the chosen afternoon. Mr. Shufult had originally intended to look after that matter hiaiself and only turned from that he might offer en- couragement to the soramohog inons- ands who are dying for something to do. ON PIKE'S PEAK. A Mamlllnnlan Uan a Merry Ride OOWB the Big Hill. George Swan, for a number of years employed on True INDEPENDENT, who represented the Canton printers at the recent convention of the International Typographical Union, held at Colorado prmgs, 
                            

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