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Marion Star Newspaper Archive: October 2, 1933 - Page 1

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Publication: Marion Star

Location: Marion, Ohio

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   Marion Star, The (Newspaper) - October 2, 1933, Marion, Ohio                               EATHER tonujti Possibly light frost falf THE MARION STAR HOME EDITION OHIO, MONDAY, OCTOBER 2, 193S. TWENTY-SIX PAGES THREE CUNTS. THREE DEAD, EIGHT HURT IN ACCIDENTS VETERANS HEM ROOSEVELT AT KAGO MEET American Killed in Cuban Outlines Economy gefore Conven- of Legion. _S FOR SUPPORT Principle in! -Cent's Program for Cvc of Disabled. 2 President! outlined the for veterans Legion today his "comrades" to I and a unitedj v.JJress was given In i stadium. i %-trterans that the' -r.iiintP-ir.ed a respon- disabled by war .-.r r.'V.-c-d to increase these :atfd that "special v. rot be given to a shove all other j :.-c he wore a I New Principle I T. added a third prin- -.v.erarss program :r.3t the federal govern- pr.-p the same relief it in caring for those i wh-> are disabled from' with war ser- to care for them- PARTY CHOICEMMV HDTEL HOUSING EX OFFICERS Ends CITY WELCOMES LEGION FROMBUCYRUS Left Foot Torn Off, Pelvis Fractured in Collision; Recovery in Doubt. llr Thr el I MACON. Oct. 2-Kate. bowl- Victim Native Of Ohio; Slain a highway, put. an eno While Watching Fight j the boxing career of William MRS. E. II. MORGAX Mrs. Morgan of 220 South Greenwood street was elected first president of the Fed- eration of Democratic Women of Ohio at the state meeting held Saturday In Columbus. An account of the meeting will found on page 2. who was second in r' the in the World .'ir.ce suffered disability paralysis, went be- convention today against advice cf friends to talk over relation of the veterans to "The rar was he said speaking of the spring of this >2T. -Obviously, the first objec- vt -m? to pet the engine run- s.i It is true that -we in reopening a of hanks, but this would s'. have been possible if at the ISM we had not been able ta the credit of the gov- 'i: Epeaking of national credit re asain with a real :o: a in books. Jn- cannot be restored, people nut back to Tvork, r? kept open, human suf- cannot he cared for, if itself is bankrupt now that the great not for you alone 3'.'. American citizens, rest pc-. unimpaired credit cf the r.-x-ause of this that we take the national of the red and put It And in the doing of i down two principles affected benefits to yr.-.i and veterans of principle, following the obligation of >--ir arms, is that'the a responsibility for those who suffered disease while tiffenae. >prcial Classes principle Is that no on Page Two 75.090 ON STRIKE AS ODE TAKES EFFECT LABOR SEEKS UNITEDJRONT American Federation Opens Meeting With Move To Settle Disputes. From Room. TO ASK SHORTER HOURS Many Contend Show of Strength-Needed to Force Recovery. By Tke fttmm WASHINGTON, Oct. 2 Old jurisdiction problems plus new ones added by the recovery act promise to fulfill predictions that the Amer ican Federation of Labor conven- tion starting today will be at least as momentous as those during war days. This was the forecast of Its officers and President William Green, was hopeful that a litMr 20 SOLDIERS ARE KILLED Firing Halts After Lasting Most of Morning: Cause Not Known. By HAVANA. Oct. 2 American 1 spectator and more than 20 soldiers i were killed today, it was announced j officially, in bitter fighting be- tween army and navy officers bar- ricated in the National hotel and soldiers firing on them from many points outside. The lives of many other Amer- icans were endangered and an artillery shell struck the Ford Mo- ter company building before the fighting ceased shortly before noon. At least 20 soldiers officially were reported slain along with the American, Robert C. Lotspeich, Havana manager for Swift Com- pany. As fire from machine guns, rifles and artillery rained upon the hotel, stray shots entered the America apartment house where many Americans lived. Was Watching Battle Lotspeich, shot through the chest was struck as he watched the fighting from the Lopez Ser- rano apartments nearby. The other persons killed and; Only most of the wounded were not im- mediately identified, owing to the practical Impossibility of getting withn close range of the battle. Smilar difficulty was encountered by those who attempted to learn the extent of the damage to the Ford building. Lawrence (Young) Strib- ling. The boxer, once a contender forj the h e a v y weight c h a m plor.shlp, was in a hospital today, h I s left foot gone and bis pelvis fractured. Today doc- tor said his chances of recov- ery Traveling 3 5 miles an hour, on a motorcycle, the 29-year-old boxer, en route to a hospital to visit his wlft and their COAST FEELS SHARPJUAKE One Killed, 4 Hurt, as Tem- blor Rocks Southern Cali- fornia Early Today. PROPERTY DAMAGE MINOR linked career. After President Grau 6an Mar- tin had been informed there were no Americans In the National ho- tel In which army and navy offl- I cers barricaded there had been I held virtual prisoners since mid- I August, additional soldiers were or- dered to join the attack. I The battle, which had raged for hours, assumed the appearance ot real warfare as the Red Cross es- tablished a first-aid station a half block away from the hotel. Colonel Fulgencio Batista, com- manding Cuba's "enlisted army, set up field headquarters in the One Critically Hurt; Center of Disturbance Ap- parently at Sea. Bj The LOS ANGELES. Oct. short. third child, born two weeks waved a greeting to a passing au- tomobile, but failrd to observe an- other csr. The fender of the au- tomobile struck S'.ribling, crushing j his left leg. i "The foot was torn off at the ankle Joint ana the bones are bro- ken so that another operation will be made .is soon patient Is strong enough." Dr. A. K. Roiar, the surgeon said. Even as his recovery remained in doubt. Stribling fought off sleep. awaiting the arrival of his "Pa" and "Ma" Stribling, whose havt> been closely with his KVyear-old fight Wared at In giving his version of the ac- cident. Stnhlmg said he was on the rightsuie of the road when "all of a sudden a. car loomed be- fore me. I cut as far to the right posrlble. and then H happened. The car hit me Miss Frances Jones, a who was riding with Roy Barrow to whom StnbllriK waved, fashioned a tourniquet to stop the flow ol blood from StrlNlng's leg. and made bandage from her dress to bind the wounds Stribling did not lose conscious- ness at the scene. Barrow as he ran to his nid. the fighter frln nert, "Well, kid. I guess It means there will he no more road work." Early today he called for "some thing cool--ice cream or beer." The doctors ordered the beer. Started at Motorcycles and airplanes, out aide the ring, occupied Stribling He got a thrill out of through traffic on his motorcycl and when he tired of he car- Disregards NRA. Recognition, Prru '-OH. Oct. NRA coal goes into the great western of the indus- strike or more adept reasoning would Induce the approximately 500 delegates to lay aside their factional disputes ana j work together in a recovery war as they had in the last real war. He and his aides were confronted with a number of major problenis. among them the contentions of many that the program is moving too slowly and that only a forceful show of strength, possibly through strikes, will bring the Je- sired speed. Some of Green's aids also held that all the recovery codes now operating must be revised to as- sure higher wages and shorter hours. Green agrees the codes must be revised, but feels that If the con- vention formally adopts any such recommendation It should at the same time give credit to t'lsse who are trying to make it work. With his consent, federation of- ficers predicted the convention will again approve a resolution de- manding a six-hour day. five-day week for all workers. It might even go further and approve his recent warning that unless the codes more nearly approximate the 30-hour-week, then labor must once more support a bill In 'con- gress for it. demanding "abso- of the United of Arnreica. strikers in picket lines ;he outcome of Wash- -which hold the of work. i :r.custria! brothel. an eye on -A-slkout of its workers spread through the Petween 10.000 and are on "holi- and union hope that Hugh "w-.-ery administrator. L----W ;s. president of t.he -ay reach an accord union recognition r-'. captive'' mines. between the two in night failed to de- ESCAPED CONVICT IS SHOT IN BATTLE Fugitive, Cornered in Sparse- ly Populated District. Is Killed. district and personally directed the attack. Cwlne Not Learned Meantime, two army tanks which had left the hotel on an unexplain- ed mission, rumbled back to the scene of action and loosed heavy machine-gun fire around the hos- telry- What started the battle early to- Contlnned on Page Two SUSPECT HELD IN WHARTON_ROBBERY Edward Lora, 43. of Toledo, in Jail at Upper San- dusky. Preiw to Star UPPER SANDUSKY. Oct. Edward Lora. 43. of Toledo, is be- ing held in the Wyandot county jail, as a suspect In the Wharton bank robbery last July 5. He was identified at Toledo Friday by A. F. Campbell and Emery Kear of Wharton. as one of the bandits who held up the Wharton bank and obtained Sheriff Harry Weatherholtz also identified him a? a man In an auto In Upper San- dusky on the Monday night pre- ceding the Wharton robbery. Lora. denies being Implicated In the rob- bery, but information received j from Toledo states that his broth- er. John Lora. has confessed. The men were arrested after tho bank robbery' Luckey last week ir, which the town marshal. Ben Stone. one of in-law sharp earthquake in Southern Cali- fornia at a. m. today caused residents to flee to the In night clothes and resulted In at least one death, injury to four per- sons and a light property dam- age. A checkup in varlcnis parts ot tho county showed the was slight. The quake appeared to be as In- tense as the March 10 shock in which more than 100 persons lost their lives and property damage mounted Into millions. Officials of the Pasadena seismcrtopMcal labora- tory said that while the quake was a severe one, its center was prob-. ably at sea j A market building at Sixty-fourth street and Central avenue was re- j ported by pollen to have collapsed and more than a ton of brick from the front of the old Central police station In Los Angeles fell into the street. Tho quake was felt throughout southern California. Long Beach. Santa Barbara, San Francisco. Whittier and points throughout the San Francisco valley reported feel- ing the shock. Mrs. Sophia Kanapon. 73, died of a heart attack after the shock. Of the four injured in Los An- geles, only one. Mrs. Marie Bene- dict. 57. was hurt critically. She suffered a possible skull fracture when a medicine cabinet In the bathroom of her home fell during the shock and struck her on the j head. j Others who were injured slight-j ly and treated at the receiving hos- pital were: Miss Charlotte Wilson. 28. MISB Helen Apodsc, 26. and j Lewis Monaty, 28. I ried his plane to exhibit hi prowess M a pilot. Hft holdi transport pilot's license and a com mission In the air corps reserve. Young Stribling made debu1 as a professional at 16. after sev eral yearn in vaudeville. Mayor Kdward J. Krllr (kft, of In thi- "key lit city" to Louis A. John-ion, national comnutftdrr of the Ix-flon. for Uir convrntlon. I'mw He gain td a national reputation In 1923 in a fight with Mlko McTlgue. Stribllng'H laat chance at tho heavyweight title came in 1931 when he lost a technical knockout to Max Schmcllng. In the Air (WIU Special) SANTA MONICA. Calif.. Oct. Rosoce Turner, who junt broke the west-east record, al- ready holding the east-west, wai, just out. Men like Turner. Hawkes, Doolittle, Post. Mattern and others who have to promote thir money, risk their lives, then do things that today are con- sidered a stunt, hut tomorrow arc an everyday affair. We used to think Japanese couicin'1 fly, but I saw a weekly whore it looked like there millions doing it. Lindbergh says has plane for every beard. we got to up. Railroads, airlines, kidnaping Jury convictions, and everything. Whatever Is going to happen to us ie? It happen quick, and get over with. Yours, Will Rogers (Copyright. 1933, MrNanghl Syndicate. Inc.) Roosevelt Looks to Banks To Supply 'Normal Credit' Approve! Cut in R.F.C. Interest Rate, Believing It Will Further Aid Prosperity Drive. H? Thr Oct. 2.-Pre.-tl- dcnt Roosevelt believes banks "should provide the normal credit killed Glenn R. Saunders. requirements for business" for the recovery program bandits, and brother- otherwise of Lora. Saunders is to have driven the car at INDIANAPOLIS, Oct. A shot-j gun charge fired by a Brown coun-jthe Wharton robbery. He was al- ty resident whose suspicions of a so seea In J the he P i of an inch ;o Today stranger were justified, has nar- rowed to eight the number of ccra- victs still fugitive from Indiana state prison as the result of last Tuesday's escapes. James Jenkins. Greene county murderer, made the fatal error ot seeking refuge in a sparsely set- tled bill county where strangers are conspicuous. He was shea ana killed at Beanblossom Saturday night after he wounded a keeper when three men Search for the eight still ir.g was pressed with undirainisbed VIThe tenth who etcaped, Clark. WM returoed to the prim M WM to tmcah itore- cornerea that robbery. Edward Lora did not take part in the Luckey rob- bery- Jt is that !et out of the car before it reached town as be was too well known there. When arrested he had   "I wouldn't Uitirhcl any In- iturance; he hn-iu'l. I'liiK to Eight Others Hurt in in This Territory Over Wcek-End. EIGHT DIE IN STATE William Steinmnn. 26, of Copoland Avenue, Dies After Crash Near Plonsnnt Acrei. Three an.l fir in Marlon vlcinliy   Spnnnn, M'. of Bucyrtn. killed whru cnr won hit by u mglnn at a Thn critically. In- rlinln 11 1) Criiwlviugtx of liMT K. (Vnii-r tdirpl, Wnliem of North Stalw utrpet. Dorothy Krhrwri-hM- of UU South Ornnit avniii'. MIM Curdirf of CnlwUmln. John Willis of Oil- Mrd nvrniin. David 85. of Crfntllnn ami Ctnir Sc.Bnlon am In KmiTKoncy hospital nt fur Irrntmrnt of Injuries mif- In two affclili'iitu ni-ar Alhrrt Johnson, 37. of Keewutin, Minn., suffpilng from Injurli-.i rvppnruntly whfri by nn autntnnltllr. was founil lytnjr the highway near Up- per Suntlunky. KUltJ Two Cart Ray Smart, 29, of 7Wi NVIaor. street was In R serious ronilltiriri today with a bullet wmirM nhcvt- i his hnart which m'-mix-rn of family snld waH Ir.-j fllctsd while Smart a .22 calibro jrvolver. Smart was boitiic tri-nK--! MI home at noon today but members of family snld rhs to remove hlrn to the <'l'y himt'ltttl t J-oti-.- He waa wound'd nlKli'. ntKiu! rrnrhH ni The woundfd tnnti hH InM July wife were the only r.r'-'ipiinti of Bo'.-t the hoimp, thn brother. J O Smart, vlrtv.J uridti nald. Hrnsrt WM.I In room of hU at thi: tim-- 'he Hun was discharged, the brother; rn., said. Smart a foundry the Marlon Steam Shovel quoted nt ti-lllnjf Klniaii Jester, deputy nmr- nhril, whrn him nhoul notr to llrnrhcl during the frdrrttl court trial In whlch the oil nmn wan chief Knv" i-rnment wltnrpn mrven convicted of kl'lnup ronrplrary. mraru everything th.it In Kfllly wan to hnvc Horlwrt K. Hyde, dlsirlct ultf.r- aitlil he would rfnv filing of iitBtp robbrry with firrarinK Krlly H.id Alb'H two by actual of iinpllnoiinifni. con- In the cnnter of the roi'l rhAfgr maximum j n t.i. of Walter nbiluclrd j thn truck partially off the with thf oil opi-ralor re" to avoid n collision. Larconi leased, of j unnbli; to car SAM INSULL FACES FEDERAL JOURT SUIT Itollry Action To MagnaU With Having Bank Account CHICAGO, Oct. Tribun Mid that Mitt to to in court will that Innull, ntll- mainUUM M Chicago Mcret tenk wlikti con- than In ItlM Add fold bttllfcm, UM tneomt of whJeb prorfdM Wm with tuoto wfcile hi to in In addition "to a jury Ka! unlay brousrht in a verdict of (rullty In t200.00Q ranwom bduction agalnxt Harvey Bailey, I. G. (Bow) Shannon. wife, )ra Armgn; Barney Her- man and CHfford Bailey, convict. WM captured on the turn where Urachel held captive more than rtpwpwtnf Om Ixrwry of Io4, the holder of 000 in of UM Inrall VitUty iNEWSPAPERl j quickly enough to avoid I car. the deputy WM told. told deputy hi blinded by the of the truck. Both and Uk- en to the county Jail after the ac- cident, were released at noon to- day after they had been by Coroner Milton Axthelm that a and idly attempted of of the hufe ransom, AJT Kelly hU wife, from the airplane them from at the airport, .oW Hyde hlr thotfrachei' In Trial of of In the of an In- thin morning. As- ginling Mr. Axthrlm In WM Kenneth A. In of M. Wlthelm, who in completing tlon today. Coroner AxUMUa i In verdict that accidental M4 waa BO of Cmt Autonoblle rtvtng cwcrrtd hi tha 1 igj 111 D. Slelnmun, of Conelund a mmildei- at Alloy Co., almoU killed when an nutomo- bllr In which a overturned after an- other Iliree south of Mnrlon on the Delaware rilght at 7.30. Wins Dorothy Kehrwntker, Jg, ot 101 South (Jrand nveniir, a pas- In the car In which Stein- man waa rlillnK, suffered and acvrirn hrulnrii. Rny North (StAte wtrcot. reported by a ilrputy nhctlff, to be the driver of thn HiiKmioblle In which Steln- ninn Kehrwrrker rldlnit. enoaped with minor Mr. and Mis. J. W. Liircorn of 137 DnWolfe court and M. K. Mat- tlson of 881 FurrnlriK xlretl. ecru- of which tho cither cur wcrn not In- jured, although thtlr badly Trurk Towlnr The tjirvtttn niitornobllr- was Irif! towpi! northward bohlnij a tvr- nlturo truck by Oernl't of Trnnd Hnplcln. Mleh. told n nhrriff'a pullliiK the cur Mnrlon after ll hii'l troubl" ahorl north of T'aimniore tolil the deputy that VV.iltern south, was m   

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