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Marion Daily Star Newspaper Archive: December 11, 1951 - Page 1

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Publication: Marion Daily Star

Location: Marion, Ohio

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   Marion Daily Star, The (Newspaper) - December 11, 1951, Marion, Ohio                               Partly cloudy and colder tonight. Low tonight 18- 22. Wednesday rather light snow late afternoon. HOME EDITION VOL. NO. 8. Anoolattd International UnlUd The DECEMBER 195L 24 PAGES Copy by Carrier Caudle's Plane Deal Hunt Slayer Of Policeman In Maryland fc Believed Hiding In Woods After Fleeing From Cleveland ELL1COTT Md. Heavily armed state police and lo- cal officers moved In at daybreak on a nearby wooded area where they believe a dangerous cop-hater is hiding after abandoning his stolen car. The gunman Is believed to be George T. 27-year-old bur- glar and wanted on first degree murder warrant In the staying of a Cleveland policeman last Saturday. He is known to be nrmsd henvl- ly and Cleveland police said he Is The manhunt started late last night when Howard County Police Russell E. Moxley and Pa- trolman Harry M. Harrison were fired on by a man hiding In a car parked along IT. Route 40. Stolen From Suburb The car .was stolen Sunday morning from a sub- urb of and Ohio offi- cers said they were certain Boss used It in his getaway. State troopers and police from Howard and Baltimore counties searched fields and all covering an area approxi- mately seven miles long and two or three miles wide. Trooper J. A. Erouchos report- ed about a. m. that two blan- some candy wrappers and cigarette butts had been found near Chestnut Hill about half a mile'east of the tilling sta- tion where Moxley and Harrison found the car parked. Intensify Search This sent a squad of state troop- ers on an intensified search of the area. Col. Elmer super- intendent of the Maryland state visited the scene. this guy killed one Munshowcr told his troopers. be ready to draw ready to pull the Roadblocks were set up on U.S 40 and other roads in the area ant Baltimore city police stopped al ears at the city about 12 eas of Ellleott City. a West Coast it wanted for the fatal shooting o Cleveland Traffic Patrolman For- ney L. the father of two children. Shot Down In ROM' Room Haas was shot down In a room Rosa rented and used ar. a storagi place for loot from recent beries. Cleveland police believi the patrolman went to RoaV room to check on his driver's license after spotting a 1050 automobile police said Ross stole In San Fran Cisco. That car was left In fron of the rooming house after Haa was and Cleveland police be P. 20. Marion Soldier Not in Crash Parents Get Word From Pfc. La Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Lant of 190 Dix Ave. have learned tha their Pfc. Raymond Lantz whom they feared hav been aboard tht. twin-engine C plane which crashed in th mountains of France last is safe at his Wheelu Field in Tripoli. Ten men los their lives In the Graph. Several letters written by Pfc Lantz last one oh the da oV the wero recelvet Monday by his He mad no mention of the plane crash since he kno his parents were alarmed for hi infety. Mr. and Mrs. Lantz had though their son might have been on th plane since he had told them he was going to on a short trip. The plane .was TRUMAN TALKS WITH ADVISERS ON kWORLD SITUATION. Highly-secret conference at the White House calls for appearance of Gen. Omar chairman of the Joint Chiefs of as well as Defense Secretary Re bert Army Secretary Frank and Gen. Hoyt Air Force Chief of Staff. President who cut short his Key West vaca- conferred with his top military and diplomatic advisers on the including hopes for a Korean truce this year. Disarmament Commission Approved But Big 4 Nations Still Differ On Arms Reduction Big Four announced agreement today to set up a new disarmament com- mission but still were as far apart as ever on what sort of arms treaty the proposed should work out. 'Fundamental differences still said the Britain and .'France in sum- marizing their ten days of secret alks..jwlth the. on how to end the Their agreement to set up the new will re- two already -deadlocked Jnltcd Nations announced In a report of the talks U. N. Assembly President Luis Padllla Nervo. He presided over the meetings. The chairman's which the Big Four unanimously ap- outlined a fundamental disagreement between the .East and West on Just what the new commission should be told to do. It was the same basic difference which exists between the Western and the Russian disarmament plans. Western Proposal The1 three Western Powers in- sisted that the commission be in- structed to draw up a step-by- step plan for arms be- with a worldwide census of arms and a foolproof system of verification. The Russians as adamantly de- manded immediate and uncondi- tional prohibition of atomic weapons and one-third reduction of'all conventional armed forces and armaments. The Big Four fail- ure to reconcile this basic dis- agreement left to the U.N. Gen- eral Assembly the problem o working out a compromise. Ob- servers doubted this could be done. It' was expeoted_ the Wesi muster enough Assembly vote's to push its own. plan through the Assembly. But such action would In turn raise the question of whether Russia would serve on a commission Instructed to work out a disarmament the Western-proposed 'lines. on Give a Christinas Clearinghouse Lists Tfiis Family This is one of a series about needy families and individuals' Hated with the. a Christ- clearinghouse maintained by the Junior Service Guild at the Salvation Organiza- tions or individuals wishing to contribute clothing or tojyj obtain the name of a needy person or family by calling Mrs. William-' clearinghouse at 2-3614 from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5 p.m. daily through Dec. -24. a alert boy of lives with his elderly aunt. She1 has cared for him since he was a baby because he was neglected. Since the death of her husband several years the aunt has tried to help Herself by'renting rooms .ing her does not have an income sufficient to meet .her needs. She receives some but will have little extra Tnoney to buy -Christmas gifts for her nephew. Everyone who knows Charles likes because of'his happy disposition. Since he and his aunt live he has learned to be very helpful around the house. Charles has very few toys clothing is also scarce. He par- ticularly needs a size and gloves. story or a used .record player will help make this Christmas a merry one for Charles.' Amendments Tangle Work On Turnpike Legislature Meets In Special Session To Rewrite Law COLUMOBOS flurry of new amendments today tangled work-of a session of the egislature called to .change- the Urnpike law so. construction can The House judiciary committee summoned the turnpike commis- lon chairman to testify at an ex- icutive meeting in the hope of solving.the problem. .He-is.Attor- ney -James of Co- Marion Store Burglarized and in all valued at about were stolen from a Bennett St. grocery some time Monday night. Ward's Market at 900 Bennett St. was entered by breaking 'a glass out of the front door. The cash was stolen from the cash reg- the merchandise from show cases. C. 'P. store said exit from the store was the back door. He discovered the burglary when he opened the store today and reported it to police. The Marion Builders Supply office at 740 Bennett. St. was entered some time Monday the office ransacked but nothing was reported Walter Schu- company said Entry was-gained by breaking a window. Mossadegh Followers in Demonstration Foes Ask Iranian Premier to Resign for went down. Marseille when it WEATHER REPORT Noon Today. 83 iM ytmtffUlir M4 Maximum 31' Minimum 27 Rainfall Trace Maximum 29 Mihmiu'm Sun rises at a.m. and sets at SUM p.m. Iran tion made a 'bold bid' to- day topple the government of Premier Mohammed Mossadegh as a'Nationalist mob battered on parliament shout- ing for the blood of aged oiler's opponents. Inside the packed building persons injured as sup- porters and opponents of gov- ernment fought briefly with 'Hats delaying the parliament session. When the Majlis chamber final- ly .was cleared of press arid pub- lic and session oppo- sition deputies'at once leaped to verbally attack the whose oil nationalization program ejected the' British-owned Anglo-Iranian Oil Company and ended chief revenues from oil produc- tion. V at the top of lungs the opposition accused Mossadegl of leading Iran -terror and ruin and demanded that he re- sign. The crowd realizin that the. eight-month-old govern ment was at raced tor radio 'loudspeakers to hear the broad- cast of the 'session. Some 500 army armed with and. were outside the building m trucks. Opposition deputies didn't heed the clamor outside. As Mossadegl walked unsteadily to the rostrum his opponents in' the chambe bopedf and banged ion thei deaks-in-any angry uproar. umbus.' .The committee' heard 13 Firemen Ask Pay Raise City Council Takes Request Under Consideration Marion firemen and policemen made formal request for a salary increase at a. meeting of City Council Monday night. Both de- partments were represented at the session. While no definite amount was listed in. the petition from mem- bers of Local International Association of the petition signed by of the police force requested a flat 20 percent increase. Both point- ed to the rising cost of living and the shrinking buying power of the dollar. Robert Romoser of the fire de- partment spoke behalf of his fellow workers. He asked Coun- cil to refer the request to the finance committee for serious consideration. He pointed to the rise in living costs since World War II and the increase was urgently needed. Robert another requested an early date with the finance com- mittee and wanted assurance the meeting would be set at an early date. Speaking on behalf of the police department was Patrolman John -who also urged an early meeting. Sixth Ward Councilman C. R. chairman of the fi- nance said two. mem- bers of the committee would end their council terms Jan. 1 and requested that the meeting be held over until after a new finance committee is named. Mr. Penn- isten and Councilman Newton Cunningham will be gone after the new council takes over. -w'it- the committee _ 3pen Hearings 3nDemandFor Union Shop Board Appointed By Truman Studies Rail Request WASHINGTON Labor reached another milestone today' in their growing drive to- have employers require workers to belong to unions. A three-man emergency board named by President Truman pre- pared to open hearings on the de- mand of 17 railroad unions for a union shop arrangement covering non-operating work- nesses oppose various parts of he turnpike act last night. The meeting-lasted until a.m. The rest of the' legislature end- ed the first day of the special ses- at p.m. It began-at p.m. with a personal appeal by Frank J. Lausche to change the domain. sections of the turnpike act to speed.financ- ing of the 240-mile toll super- road across northern Ohio. Few Forecast .Defeat Turnpike legisla- tors to predict failure of an emer- gency clause in the administration- Jacked change. A' few forecast defeat for the proposal but lead- ers still felt it would pass. Emergency legislation that comes .effective on enactment re- quires a two-thirds favorable vote In both houses. Regular legisla- tion requiring a majority vote takes effect 90 days after enact- ment. i The governor has said failure to change the law would doom the turnpike for the 'foreseeable Its he strengthen the highway sys- tem ol Ohio without adding any financial burden taxa- The commission plans to build the turnpike from sale of revenue bonds to private investors. Bankers want the law changed so they can sell the bonds immediately. They object to the present law that requires settlement of all court suits over the price of land before commission can take it for a right-of-way. They want authority for the commission to take condemned land and pay for it after courts finally fix Ohio Opens Campaign To Fight Oat Wiilt. COLUMBUS Ohio at 'inroads of oak in'Ohio forests today opened V campaign to raise in 1952. The association- to use nearly half. Its 1952 for field .work and eradi- cation of .disease that threatens the state's oak the heart' Ohio's timber A part of the 'big- campaign against oak. wilt will come next spring when a survey .will be at locating trees and stopping spread- of disease. Fourth Ward Councilman Louis Conkle. Expiates Position Mr. Pennisten told the firemen and patrolmen he would not wan to start work on their reques without completing it. He addec he did not toelieve the work conic be completed in a three-week period. Representatives of the two city departments agreed to wait until after the new commit- tee was named after being as- sured th'e meeting would be car- ried over as unfinished business. The firemen and patrolmen re- ceived their last pay raise Apri 1 when a monthly increase was granted all members of the Including the chiefs and captains. Present Pay Scale Firemen and patrolmen now receive monthly. A raise was granted to the departmen heads and captains two weeks ago at a special meeting Council. That raise was grantee to set up a pay differential in the two Chief Owen A Sifritt'of the Fire said today. The chiefs received a Departmen departmen annua raise while captains in the two departments received an annua boost of At the same council meeting all elected city officials wen granted pay boosts ranging from for Municipal Court judge to granted the city treasurer The raises go into effect Jan. 1. George president pro- tern of said the raise re- quest of the firemen and police would be referred to finance com- mittee and a meeting would be held as soon as possible afte Jan. 1. Approved 'Unanimous approval was given an ordinance commercializing lots on N. Main St. The ordlnanc provides for the rezoning of al land on'the west side of Main St from Klerx St. to the city limits and all land on the east side o Main St. to the City Limits. Par 'of these lots had'been commercia before passage of the ordinance Lots on east side of the. stree may.be commercialized to the firs to CITY P. 11 FIVE-DAY OHIO FORECAST Temperatures .average three 'toisbcl below nor- mal. Normal maximum 37 43 Normal minimum 23 27 south. Cold ''through Sunday- with 'coldest about Satur- day. SHOPPING DAYS TO CHRISTMAS WANTS Democratic chairman Frank holding up a newspaper at his Washington calls for thorough investigation of tax scandals by an source answerable .only to the At the same McKinney defended his own stock transactions. He admitted making about in 10 months on an in- vestment of in stock of the now-defunct Empire Tractor Co. He said the deal was and and offered to throw open his business' records for inspection. demand for a union shop is being made by. the .CIO's Steelworkers in current negotia- tions with the steel Industry. would cover another workers. Various other industries are presently facing union shop requests from The union shop clause in labor contracts' requires that workers oin the union within a specified time. Usually the period is 30 but in the case of the rail- roads it is 60 days. The .union shop differs from the closed shop. Under the he employer may hire union or so long he worker becomes a union mem- jer within the allotted time. Should the .worker quit the he'd lose his the employer is compelled to fire him. The -closed illegal under he Taf t-Hartley requires that a prospective worker must already belong to the union be- fore he can be hired. TYPHOON LEAVES 23 DEAD MANILA A typhoon howled into the China Sea today leaving' dead and tens of thousands homeless in the devas- tated central Philippines. Ninety per cent of the homes on the east coast of where the typhoon first 'were reported wipec out. Inhabitants called it the typhoon in living mem- i Marion Buses Held Up Four Hours by Strike Start Delayed By Controversy Over Christmas Operation Marion Transit Co. drivers went on strike briefly today hi an attempt to get Christmas day off from work. BMses which usually leave about 4 ajn. were held up lor more than four hours. The drivers approached Floyd owner of the bus lines last week and asked if they- could have Christmas day off. He told them he was bound by a franchise to give partial service on holi- days so he would have to have some of them work. At Council Seaslon 'The drivers then decided to go before last night's meeting of cits council and try to amend the franchise. A delegation of driver attended the council meeting bu left before council started to dis- cuss the members agreed to look into the problem and either have partial as is now provid- or not have any service at al on as well as other holidays throughout the year. at 4 ajn. when the buses were scheduled to leave the the drivers held i meeting. They called Kreisel a' a.m. and presented him with an amendment to the existing union contract. The drivers .are members of Local 222 of thi Transport Workers Union CIp. Accepts Amendment The amendment stated tha anything the drivers did on Christmas day would not be con- strued as a breach of the exist. contract. Kreisel said he agreed to the amendment so the buses could get rolling. He said it was getting late he was trying to think of. tin public and what is asked in tb franchise. He said he is bound tf Concedes Case Was Ousted Assistant Made As Commission on Sale WASHINGTON General J. Howard McGrath today defended the propriety of a commission received by T. Lamar Caudle on an airplane sale but conceded it was a As for some of the other activi- ties of his ouster former assistant ttorney McGrath 'I hold no brief for any indis- tions of which Mr. Caudle may ave been nor do I pre- ume to judgment on The cabinet official was called efore a House ways and means ubcbmmittee investigating tax candals and the administration of he Justice Department tax divi- formerly headed by Caudle. McGrath said he had not the slightest of the propriety Caudle's having accepted the paid him as commission on the sale of a airplane to jarry associate of the two ew Yorkers then under indict- mqnt on charges of tax fraud. Is It Not Rep. Kean asked If pay- ment of such a large amount to a overnment official in a ransaction was ''not never happened Mc- Grath was a unique asked lean. McGrath responded. The payment was ap- proved by McGrath when Caudle isked him last September if it -was all right to accept it. Caudle testified that McGrath to Page Old Building To Be Appraised for Auction Survey of Centred Junior High Building Approved A survey of the .old Central increased school levies approved Junior High School in- cluding the buildings and the was authorized by the Marion Board of Education at a meeting Monday I administration building. This survey will be in prepara- tion for a public auction of the to -held -on Jan. on the steps of the court- house. The buildings been vacant since the- new State St. Junior High building was placed in .use. The board selected the lighting fixtures for fhei new senior high school building to-be constructed near the Harding sta- dium. This action by the board completes the selection of all materials for basic construction of th'e The new lights will be of the fluorescent type. The board also action to accept the.nejv.-tax by the eountr auditor to fee. by the voters. The board approved a reques of the State Street Junior High School Student Council to place plaque.in the State Street build ing honoring W. E. prin who has been on disability retirement since Dec. 1. Speaker for annual commence ment exercises of Harding High School in June was named' by th hoard1 members. Addressing th seniors -will be Dr. John H. Fur bay of New York director of Air World'Education.. He .has appeared in Marion in 'the pas speaking before a' clu audience. A brief meeting of the has been to be held Dee. to' complete the year's business the. annual organization the first session of th new has been announced fo Jan. 7. At this elec officers -of .the board foi the-year will be held. said it would be OK to take tha money since Caudle had a large family. It was handed to Caudle by a W. A. owner of a plane sold to Knohl. At that Knohl was helping prepare the defense of Samuel Aaron and Jacob .New .York .businessmen who were convicted in October of evading income taxes. According to .testimony before he numerous efforts were made to delay the trial. De- jartment memoranda were read jefore the committee quoting an reached between Caudle and Charles chief counsel of the Internal Revenue at one time not to prose- cute the .case. Fired by Truman President Truman fired Caudla ast month for what the White louse termed ncompatible with bis official duties. .Three To Hear From Nearing the end of its inquiry nto Teitelbaum's sensational under com- mittee still had to hear from three assigned obscure roles in Teitelbaum's shakedown recita- The three are Bert K. a Florida electrical supply manu- whom the committee leard briefly-and-secretly last Charles who resigned last week as chief coun- sel of the Internal Revenue Bu- and Henry man-about-Washing- and will-o-the-wisp private investigator who has figured be- Fore in congressional investiga- tions. Naster was expected to follow McGrath to the witness while Oliphant is due tomorrow. Grunewald's appearance was un- is in a Washington hospital suffering emo- tional and gastro-intes- tinal disturbances. Teitelbaum accused Naster and Frank. -a Florida pro- of promising him back tax troubles unless he paid them claiming Influ- ence with a of Washing- ton officials looking for Grunewald. was brought Into the hearing limelight yesterday when Caudle told the committee he_ that c. Grunewald was the man'with the gut- tural Such a Caudle said Teitelbaum told warned Teitelbaum in an anomymous long distance tele- phone call to In the. attempted-tax fix.shakedown. WlMle Stenr Not Told In this air of coinmit- sources clear they did not consider whole story to told that evidence to point thus to a in plot un- folded by Teitelbaum. The committee last night fin- with with tram King.   

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