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Mansfield News Journal Newspaper Archive: May 18, 1956 - Page 1

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Publication: Mansfield News Journal

Location: Mansfield, Ohio

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   Mansfield News Journal (Newspaper) - May 18, 1956, Mansfield, Ohio                               I WEATHER Scattered showers tonight and Saturday. Low tonight 15. MANSFIELD NEWS-JOURNAL VOL. 72, NO. 73 PHONE 7231-6 MANSFIELD, OHIO, FRIDAY, MAY International News Service United Press SEVEN CENTS Blackie' Nabbed In Chicago Russians To Visit New T' Party Of Eleven Due Here June 7 -Nine touring Russian Church leaders will come to Mansfield" Jung 7 to inspect the new YMCA-YWCA build- ing- Edgar Torrence, general secretary of the YMCA, learned today that the Rus- sian churchmen will stop in Mansfield for one hour dur- ing their 11-day visit to the United States. Sponsored by the National Coun- cil of Churches, the visit will give the Russians a close-up view the of American churches in the United States. In Mansfield, the Russians will learn how the YMCA and YWCA work with the people of the community. ONLY 'Y' VISIT Torrence said that this is the only YMCA-YWCA buildmg the churchmen will visit during their stay in this country. "To say that we're pleased they've chosen our building to visit would-be an un- derstatement on my Tor- rence said. The YMCA General Secretary said that the visitor would drive to Mansfield from Toledo where they will have been honored guests at the 55th anniversary ban- quet of Toledo Council of Churches. Torrence said they would arrive at the YMCA-YWCA building at 11 a m and then leave for Wooster at noon. FIUST VISIT Four Americans who speak Rus- sian fluently will travel with the party and act as interpreters. of the nine has ever before visited the United States. The Russians will begin their tour of this country June 2, in New York City. Toledo is as far vest as they will visit. Much of their time will be spent sightsee- ing m New York City, Washing- ton D C and Philadelphia. The Russians are completing a two-way visit project which was begun in March when a group of (Continued on Page 2) Bookkeeper Sentenced Beer Permit Restrictions Eased Small Stores Get Benefit COLUMBUS were-opened today for hundreds of new liquor permits in Ohio, and carry-out stores were freed entirely from the need of obtaining permits to sell beer and wine. The liquor department filed with the secretary of state Thursday its proposed new ''freeze' validated by the Ohio Supreme Court to replace one in- It will become law in 10 days unless a court suit is brought against it in the interim. The complete "thaw" on beer and carryout permits was taken largely as a step to aid the small grocer. The cornerstore grocer was often put out of business because he was unable to get a permit for beer and wine, while all the big cnain markets had them. The other chief provision is that communities which have grown since 1950 will be allowed more permits for tavern and restaurant sales, based on the increased pop-! iflation. v 1 The high court recently declared illegal the freeze imposed in 1949 on the grounds that it did not take into account population shifts and increases. Hail, Rain Barrage Hits City 1950 CENSUS GAUGE Under the new regulation, politi- cal subdivisions will be allowed Mansfield and the area es-ithe same ratio of permits to popu- caped- with damage lation as existed in 1950, the time is now from an electrical storm yes- of the last census, terday afternoon which I brought a downpour of hail over the south and west sec- tions of city. An electric wire which blew down on Bethel Lane off Park Ave- nue West Rd. caused a two-hour power failure in the, section west of the city and affected from 1001 each S 3 M the population as of 1956. Growing communities will be al- lowed approximately one new per- mit for each 2.000 population added since 1950. New cities or villages 111 DG ISSUfeil Gilt; iliirtt ElCj Liquor Director William C. Bry- (Continued on Page 2) customers in the Marion Ave. area were without power for an hour and 20 minutes because of a blown fuse on a transformer on the' street. Otherwise the .city escaped with-i out serious damage. i I The pea-size hail, which drove from the northwest, knocked leaves off trees but surprisingly did very little damage to tulips now in bloom. Carlton Lees, horticulturist at Kingwood Center, said the huge beds of tulips now on display there) WASHINGTON (UP) Official were damaged only slightly. 'forecasts of an expanded govern- CAA Airways station spokesmen ment surplus this >ear today at the airport reported only a two-1 stirred cautious new talk in Con-i degree drop m temperatures dur- gress of a tax cut. But-tfrcre were; ing the storm and said the mer- also fresh warnings that this isn't cury rose to 55 degrees at the time for it Reporter Beats Boss To Punch GAFFNEY, S. C. (INS) G. Avakian, a reporter on the Gaff- Ledger, walked into the of- Tax Cut Talk Hits Capital Big Surplus Seen At End Of Year SHE'S CHAMP Sachko, left, 13-year-old Pittsburgh girl, gets kissed by her mother, Mrs. Charles Sachko in Washington after winning the 29th annual National Spelling Bee by correctly spelling "c o n d o m i n i u m." She outlasted 62 other young contestants. (Unifax Photo) To March Military Parade Marshal Selected She Studied, Then Won Girl, 13, Tops Spelling Match Doss ana admitted ne had played a game of golf during working hours. He added: "I shot a hole-in-one, and I j you'd hear about it sooner i or later." Held On Loitering Charge Fled Workhouse Last Aug. 20 By ALLAN WEGEMER Mansfielder Robert .E. "BFackie" McDaniel, 32, who fled Senate Vote Seen Today On Farm Bill workhouse last August, has been found in Chicago, auth- orities here learned last night. McDaniel, who escaped from the workhouse for the second time Aug. 20. was serving a one-half-year term for contributing Parts Opposed By Administration WASHINGTON Sen- ate hoped to get a final vote on the new farm bill by nightfall. The bill, a modified version of a House-approved measure, con-i tained President Eisenhower's j billion soil bank. Howeveiv it did not include his controversial proposal to pay farmers one-year in advance for taking acreage out of production. j PARTS UNSATISFACTORY i The administration strongly op-! poses two of the bill's provisions increases in price supports of feed grains and export sales of surplus cotton at world market prices.----------_ Under the cotton provision, Sec- retary of Agriculture Ezra T. Ben- sen would have to offer surplus U.S. cotton for export sale at a maximum price of 25.5 cents at pound. That is nearer the world market price than the 27.5-cent level Benson had planned to put on the cotton. The administration fears other cotton-producing nations would ac- cuse the United States of trying to drive them out of the world mar- ket fey dumpnng its surplus at subsidized prices. 'BLACKIE' M'DANIEL By BILL ROGERS Thomas Taylor of 537 West Fourth St., a veteran of Miss Minnie C. Mangum, 52, was sentenced to a maximum 10 years rn prison at Thursday's first trial on a relative minor charge knowingly giving false information to Virginia's Corpora- tion Commission about her com- pany's financial condition. RELATIVES PRESENT Dabbing at her tear-filled Many sections of the city, in- national debt. oped-instead for a payment on the the Armed Forces Day parade which will wend its way NORFOLK, Va (UP) "Miss p. m. from a former reading of. Considerable sentiment devel- the Spanish-American War, will act as grand marshal of Minnie." a short, plump spinster 153 _ _ _ who allegedly embezzled nearly million, faced new trials today on indictments carrying possible sen- tences totaling hundreds of years. eluding the downtown section, es- caped the hail. Meanwhile, said they've weathermen, who been known to be S3 BILLION AHEAD Separate of the sur- jplus came from congression- wrong before, promised a brief staff experts and the Treasury, terlude of fair weather by tonight. [The congressional group said the Today's noon temperature was 50 and was expected to reach as high as 60 by mid-afternoon as a south- erly flow of air penetrates the penetrates state. It will be a little cooler Satur- timate in January. He had put. or Sunday, a little probable surplus for fiscal! government will wind up the fis- cal year billion in the clear. The Treasury forecast a year-end surplus of billion. Both forecasts ran sharply! above President Eisenhower's es-, WASHINGTON Melody Sachko, 13-year-old first prize winner in the 1956 national spelling bee, today gave this sim- jple advice for future hopefuls to- jday: Memorize dictionary. The slim, brown-eyed girl from Pittsburgh has been at it for two years. For the past >car she has been concentrating on a two-vol- ume number that she won in a Pennsylvania contest. STUDIES EVERY NIGHT "I studied every Melody for more said, "unless it was and that wasn't very often." She confessed that she didn't learn "all the words." But she knew enough to outlast 62 other COLUMBUS. 0. (UP) The School and Madison High in Thursday's nine-hour i east on Park Avenue West tomorrow. PUCO Gets Rate Fight Taylor will be riding in the lead automobile of the military parade, billed as one of the largest in Mansfield's history. The column of marchers will stretch than a half mile. An estimated persons, in- cluding bands from. Senior High to the delinquency of two minor girls. He -was- taken into custddy %y Chicago police yesterday for lolt- "ering residential area. Richland County Sheriff E. P. "Doggie" Long, notified of Me- Daniel's capture, immediately sent a wire to Chicago authorities re- questing that McDaniel be held pending a determination by Rich- land County authorities on how next to proceed in the case. UP TO COURT Sheriff Long said that it is up to the court here to decide whether or when McDaniel will be returned to Mansfield. As events would have it, Com- f Amon Pleas Court Judge Kalb- i IfDTYi Beisch, Probate Court Judge Stu- art tf Oamw and Pnnntv Prrvso- For 'Anguish? Of Goldfish A Willard man has filed a dam- age claim with the state because, he said, an airplane insect dusting program caused "mental anguish" j McDaniel was picked up yester- for the fish in his backyard and day about 6 p. m. by three Chicago art H. Cramer and County Prose- cutor Theodore Lutz, one or more of whom could be expected to deal with the case, all are out of the city today. And Municipal Judge G. M. Mar- riott said that he could not con- ceive of any circumstance which, would place the case in his juris- diction. (Contained On Page 20) ruined his fishpond. The claim was filed with the state sundry claims board by Ed- _, _ _ wain L. Black. He asks for j LollimbttS ASKS water lilies that allegedly were' _ destroyed, and for his fishes' JKatC mental anguish. Slack says his pool, a thing of COLUMBUS. 0. (UP) City of- Gas and the Ohio Fuel are expected to participate in the'bee. It was the largest of annual nis "-their sleeves! annual observance. Marchers will'bees sponsored since 1925 by the for trials announced today that a uW- rate fight i form on Maple St. and Brinker- Scnpps-Howard and other newspa- abandoned andjities expert will be hired to study ioic iigui I- flllArt With UHt n( tf.ml with her small white lace hanky, Miss Minnie, a Sunday school teacher, was led from the court- room by relatives. A million dollar embezzlement trial begins Monday on 22 counts activity "in "the" Great i starting" JulyT putting" this "fig- per cent< of theft ranging from to 'Lakes region pushed more cold air jure at billion covered during 23 the area todayj dropping the; immediate reaction among key 016 mercury to 39 degrees at a. m. Monday and Tuesday and cool, 1955 at only S230 million, again Wednesday. Rainfall will av- j The congressional group staff erage near one-half inch withiexperts of the joint House-Senate showers Saturday or Sunday and Committee on pre- again Tuesday or Wednesday., i dieted a surplus from fiscal 1957, before the Ohio Public Utibties hoff Ave. with starting time sched- Commission. for p. m. The utility wants a 21 per cent, A reviewing stand will be set up increase in natural gas rates but'in Central Park facing north on the city is willing to grant only'" of the she worked for Commonwealth Building and Loan Assn. of Norfolk. Conviction on __ xr-n any of the counts could add an-1 Train Kills other 10 years in prison. CHILLICOTHE And after that trial, the little old lady who had lived all her life with community respect faces trials on 14 more indictments, most with multiple charges. One charges her with stealing 957.06. Hilton Chain Buys 2 Hotels CINCINNATI Hilton hotel chain was reported today to be buying two ritzy Cincinnati ho- tels, "the Netherland Plaza and Terrace 0. (UP) Karen Sue Fraley, 12, was kOled here Thursday when she ran into the path of a Norfolk Western freight train on her way home from school. lawmakers was mixed but weight- ed on the side of caution. Merger Approved BILL REJECTED North Park St. Reviewing party pers. Melody was sponsored by Pittsburgh Press. filled with soil. the1 Tne recent asrplane .dusting jtht books of the Ohio Fuel Gas Co. of! The move resulted from a gas [400 acres in Willard was an at- j company request for a 15 per cent The word she won on was "con- temP{ lo eliminate the Japanese domimum." Before that she out- beetle. will include Mayor Robert S. Lem- spelled her last opponent and run- ley. Paul Bush, president of city nerup, 13-year-old Sandra Owen Council, and senior officers, active from Justus, Ohio, on "afflatus Ohio Fuel Gas notified the com- (or retired, of the Mansfield armed mission late Thursday that it reserve units rejected the Lorain ordinance. The' Fourteen units will take part in company asked the PUC to set the the parade. Units in the order they escort- CLEVELAND, 0. merger was agreed between the Stanfiard Products Co. of Cleveland and the Sheller Man- ufacturing Corp. of Detroit. Wl11 march are: PUC kill the Ohio Fuel Gas appeal for higher rates on grounds the city has the right to set them. Crestliner Wins Case In Cleveland Awarded Eve new rates instead. (UP) Ai Lorain Solicitor Edward J. Con- to Thursday ley already has demanded that the military command, compos-] ite military color guard, Seniorj High School Band, Army Reserves Marine Reserves, Included in the parade will be a 25-ton M-42 tank, which will be brought here from Canton by truck. The tank will be on display the airport following the par- ade. Naval Truckers Win Rate Battle With Railroads (Continued on Page 2) rate hike. If approved, the increase would become effective in Novem- ber. COLUMBUS. 0. (UP) An Tour Of New York Offered In June Like to visit JNew York City for a weekend? The Mans- field News-Journal and the Erie Railroad is offering the opportunity to residents of the city and area for the sec- Akron trucking firm today was pro- claimed the victor in its fightfond annual trip to the "Big City" next month, against seven railroads before thej The special Ohio Public Utilities Commission, taken on the ____ ____ The railroads had charged thejered "Lake Cities" with the lobby at a. m. for Transportation Co. of conditioned train leaving Mans- j a visit to Rockefeller Center Obser- excursion will be Erie's diese! pow- Reserves, Ohio Air i Direct Na-1 Akron with setting an "unfair" field at 3 46 p. m. Friday, June tional Guard, massed colors, VFW rate on the shipping of and returning from tlie tour at massed colors. American Legion; crude rubber between Cincinnati a. m. Monday, June 18. resentatives will meet with the owners of the two hotels, the Tho- mas Emery Co., on Monday and that employes were told to stand by for an announcement. The Netherland Plaza was rated a million hotel when'built in 1931, and the Terrace Plaza was built for ago. million a few years Only Kidding COLUMBUS (INS) Mayor Maynard E. Sensenbrenner said Thursday he was "only kid- ding" when he said he would op- pose Sen. John W. Bricker (R- Obio) in the 1958 election. Gehrisch.j Gehrisch was his own ma in1 of his left eyelids made him feel 3, a filling station attendant here, witness during the three-day trial ill at ease socially. He said that while his right eye is good, he cannot read for more1, than 15 minutes at a time without j tiring. Gehrisch testified that be-, cause of his impaired sight hej often bumped into people on the! rrace was awarded yesterday asin Cleveland, testifying a deformity It was reported that Hilton rep- damages for the loss of the sight of one eye. The amount was set by a feder- al jury in Cleveland which heard his personal injury suit against the Pennsylvania Railroad Co. The Crestliner lost the sight of his left eye as a result of an acci- detn while he was working in the Pennsylvania Railroad shops in Crestline March 31, 1951. STEAM STRUCK FACE According to testimony, a metalj stud flew out, hurling a blast of steam into Gehrisch's face while he! was repairing steam pipes on a lo- comotive. Today's Index Classified Ads 22-26 Comics 27 Deaths 6 Editorials 4 Hospital News 15 Kilgallcn 22 Markets 2 Society 10-13 Sports ....'................18-19 TV and 16 Weather IS Worry Clinic 9 street and driving. was handicapped in! (Continued on Page 2) To Be Closed Wayne St., from East Fourth to East Fifth St., will be closed to i and Akron. Loaded with points of interest in vatory, TO stories above the street, for a panoramic view of the entire metropolitan area. At p. m. Saturday, they will be served The truck rate was 28 cents per New York, which will be pointed luncheon in the famous Down-Cn- all to 2 sioner today. tornorrow from 9 a. m. 1100 pounds with a pound minimum. The railroad rate was 61 cents for the same quantity with a pound minimum. The Public Utilities Commission ruled the railroads failed to prove the reduced rate would create "de- structive competition." The seven railroads who brought out by tour guides, the trip will be der restaurant iu the RCA bufld- E. E. Hartnelt said the section of the Corp. "toj ASKED Gehrisch was represented by the Cleveland law firm of Metzen. baum. Schwartz and Disbro, andjWestinghouse Electric a member of the firm, Robert a bjg welding machinc fromjni Disbro, had asked the jury to give tnc street level on Wayne St. to his cKent the fourth floor of K building." The railroad's attorneys did not Hartnett said that drivers "can call any witnesses in the trial be- go up Fifth St. and the ones going announced canton Youngstown, Baltimore Ohio, Eric, Pennsylvania. Cbes- Ohio N0rf0Hc Western fore U. S. District Judge Paul down Fourth St. can go down to Jones. IPunty St. and over to Fifth St." WARREN, 0. (UP) Some 00 employes were idled at the Copperweld Steel Co. today after workers 'walked off their jobs in a grievance disupte. similar to the sell-out success sponsored for the first time last year by the railroad and the news- paper. TOTAL COST Price of the tour is each for adults and S33.75 each for chil- jdren under 12 years. The cost in- cludes hotel room in New York City, several meals and tips. Con- tinental style meals will be served on the train. Arriving at 8.25 a. m. in Jersey City, weekend vacationers wiU be transferred to waiting mo t o r coaches for a trip through the Hot- land Tunnel to the Hotel Century in New Yory City. After free time at the hotel, the vacationscs will mg. YACHT CRUISE Following lunch, motor coaches will pick up the tourists for trans- portation lo the harbor where a three hour yacht cruise guided sightseeing around Manhattan will be provided. Points of interest will be the Statue Liberty; fi- nancial district, Governors Island (bought from the Indians in 1643) and now headquarters of the first Army. Hell Gate, the East River, Brooklyn Navy vYard. Yankee Sta- dium, Polo Grounds, tl New Jersey, George Waataoflifli Bridge. After the cruise, vacationers wtt M ttfC I) I JEWS PA PER I IFWSPA.PFJ   

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