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Mansfield Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 25, 1891 - Page 1

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Publication: Mansfield Evening News

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   Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 25, 1891, Mansfield, Ohio                               Do You Intend to Make any effort toward increasing your busi- ness this year? News advertising will pay you. "Heaven never helps the man who will not act." THE EVENING NEWS. The People Read the News Let them know through its columns what you have for sale. Judicious advertising increase your business. Let your liRht shine. VOL. 6, NO. 293, MANIbFIaiLD, O., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1891 The Last Week the Great Discount W E have now given every one a chance (to Imy Clothing, Hats and Men's Furnishing Goods at his own price. In order that no one may be slighted, we give you due notice that on Satur- day, Feb. 28, will be our last clay oi Discount. So avail your self of this opportunity as it will not soon occur again. Thishas been the Greatest Discount Sale we ever had and this time we are better prepared to open up the spring trade than ever. We will only have a few heavy goods to pack away. Those hav- ing purchased from us no doubt will remember the great bar- gains they have had and will give us their patronage in the future. Remember the closing day of discount. Shonfield Friedrich Largest, Lowest Priced and Only One Price _____Clothiers, Tailors, Hatters and Gents'_____ ?the I Open tokening County. Off NEW Tbe Clothier. ThisWeek NEW .00 Ofi on all Pantaloons above Off on all Pantaloons above THIS WEEK ONLY il. NEW The Clothier. ThisWeek   NEW WASHINGTON NEWS. Appropriations for the World's Fair. SEVERAL REDUCTIONS MADE.   During week I will be daily opening and display- ing lines of waah-dreaa-gooda white and black Hamburg Bdginga and flonnoinga, Cur- tain nets Hosiery and Gloves. Also a special bargain in Black Silk Warp and all wool Serges. No such Values in the market. Jos. H. Black Cor. Main Fourth THE MARKETS. at tbe Grain aud Cattle for February M. Cincinnati. SJitftilc. L fine merino, 1 1 mlniiK. "33c; medium delaine and cloUinu. U) braid, me- dium cl.itMig -3 aic; Meece-wiuihfd fine nurifo X mi'i XX, ilMftte; medium cloth- ing, 8 CAI'LLI- Uood to choice butchers, (3 0 (34.50; lu r to medium, com liion, ft M'k'it butchers mid heavy ship plug, frl W> fair to Koud mixed, t8 8C U3 UH r The United Stateo Government to Be Liable for Only One Million and a Half of the of the HOOM and Foiter IMipatchei from the J National Capital. WASHINGTON, Feb. commit- ee amendments to the sundry _ civil jill in reference to the world's fair, were agreed to yesterday. They ore aa ollows: Reducing the item "For the selection, purchase, preparation and ar- angements of exhibits of the executive lepartment" from to Striking out of the item the provisions hat of the amount shall be de- otod to the Latin-American depart- inent, and inserting in it a provision ap- j jropriuting to the purpose of the item ny sum remaining unexpended under Section 18 of the act authorizing the ex- jxwition, except that of such sum may expended for the balance of the urrent fiscal year for salaries and other xpenses, including the expenses of the ward of lady managers. Striking out the various detailed itema or talaries and expenses and inserting n lieu of these a bulk appropriation of 40.000 for salaries and other expenses, nclndlng expenses of the board of lady managers, and providing that its expen- ditures is to be approved by the secretary of the treasury, and that the govern- ment is not to be liable for any further salaries, -compensation or expenses. Inserting as an additional paragraph a leclaration that the several sums appro- bated in the bill for the world's Co- nmblan exposition shall be deemed a part of the sum of the limit }f liability of the United States on ac- count thereof. ________ Hr.nee and Senate WASHINOTON, Feb. house after routine business took up he direct tax bill and after a long dis- cussion it WM amended, passed and a confeience committee appointed. The conference report on the naval appro- priation bill was agreed to and the house djourned. The senate passed the house bill, with substitute, to establish a United States land court and to provide for a udicial investigation and settlement of trivate land in Utah, New Mex- co, Colorado, Nevada and Wyoming. [Tie sundry civil appropriation bill was considered and several amendments ulopted, and after disposing of sixty- bur of 115 pages of the Dill, Mr. Cam- eron presented resolutions of sorrow at to K' oil IUM. mi to rough, 75; fai 75; pigs, rr> 80 DO. _ I'iltiburg. CAT L- line, M HJWS aV, good, 4Gu u.lr, and feeders, H r.ih c i l x n M IvUcil, ili'ifgt.OC; VIM. c. 5jio'iiri'OM to mlr York 8. I 7 H. SIIH .'.xliii, U, fair to goix M 75 S 1 common, lambs, I' 60. _ _____ Toledo TOMOO, p.m.. WHKAT-Cash Mar KiV A UK. 90. CORN-Caah OATS-Noininnl. RERD-Cash 4.110. wiuioa. l DEAD. Maryland i.nst H one of Her tlved lit IT H of WASHINGTON, Feb. E. K. Wilson, of Maryland, died here last, night at m liis apartments at the Hamilton House, of heart disease, in his 70th year. Mr. Wilson was in his sect in the sen- ate chamber last Saturday appar- ently in good health, anil the news of his death came as a si ock to the commun- ity. He com- plained en Sun- day and Monday, but hir condition was not regarded as serious until late Mon- day night, when he had a sinking spell, but he revived, and luesday morning was thought to be out of danger. Later in the day he grew worse and hoveied between life and death until about 10 o'clock at night, when the end came. i phraim King Wilson ranked with the Bayards and AdanYses among our few herejitary legislators. His father was long a lawmaker, serving in the house of representatives of the Twentieth and Twenty-fiist congress, and the son has been ahncut continuously in office for over forty years. He was bom at bnow Hill, Ml, 98, 1831. After an academy course he entered Jefferson college, Pennsylvania, where he was graduated in 1841. Soon after he was j admitted to tbe bar. In 1847 he was elected to the Maryland legislature, in 1852 was ao elector on the Pierce and King ticket, served in the National house for the term of 1873-76 and has filled other offices. He was chosen to the United States senate in 1881, and was re-elected for the term to end in 1897. COLUHBUSSHOOTIM It Is the Sensation of the Hour at Ohio's Capital. PDRTHER FACTS IN THE CASK presented he death of the late Representative 'Watson, of Pennsylvania. Eulogies were delivered and the senate aa a farther mark of reapect adjourned. Secretary Footer Confirmed. WASHINGTON. Feb. the nomination of ex-Governor Foster, of Ohio, to be secretary of the treasury, with the favorable recommendation of the finance committee was read in the secret session of the senate yesterday, i western senator said that in prevent- ug immediate consideration of the nomination Monday by having it re- 'erred to the committee, the usual custom, he had acted at the request of a who seemed to have some reason for not wanting immediate action. He bad no farther objection to make, and would not bave made ob- lection Monday had he not been request- )d to do so. The nomination was then confirmed. ________ Wai Ther.i a Hllvrr Fool WASHINGTON, Feb. The special koose committee charged wirh the in- vestigation of the silver pool met yester- day for the first time in two weeks and namined Senator Jones, of Nevada. Senator Jones positively denied having any knowledge of the existence of a pool or of any senator, representative or- ;overnment official dealing in silver or diver bullion. He said he was well ac- quainted with the silver miners of Ne- vadada and thought, that if a pool exist- ed he would have known of it Pemlan for Banki. WASHINOTON, Feb. president has approved the bill granting a pension to Gen. Nathaniel P. panks. CHICAGO'S INDIANA CLUB. The Capture of Celebrated by lianqnet la the Garden City. CHICAGO, Feb. Sons of In- diana, a social club composed of Hoosier residents in the Garden City, celebrated the anniversary of the capture of Vin- cennes, by a grand banquet at the Leland hotel last night. A number of ln- diauians prominent in art. arms, science, liteiatnre and law, accepted invitations and were present. The first toast, "The State of Indi- ana." was responded to by the Hon. B. W. Thompson, of Terre Haute; "The Indiana Soldier" was eulogized by Gen. Lew. Wallace, of Crawfordsville! "Morton, the Greatest of War Gov- furnished the theme for the eloquence of the Hon. John L. Griffiths; Governor Gray spoke on "Hendricks, the Ideal John Lyle King denned and described "The Typical Maurice Thompson gave one of his charming talks about the "Indi- ana Literary J. Whitcomb Biley expatiated on the "Humor of Hoosier while "The Capture of Vin- cennes" and "The Natural Resources of Indiana" were respectively treated of by John Clark Bedpath and Theodore N. Shockley._______________ SUIT AGAINST A RAILROAD. A Number of Can Attached on the Toledo and Hocking Valley UUP. INDIANAPOLIS, Feb. and Churchman, bankers, yesterday filed suit in attachments against the Toledo and Hockmg Valley Railroad company, and several of the company's cars were stoi ped here and are now in the hands of the sheriff. Writs have been sent to the northern part of the state and it Is ti.e purpose to stop every car belonging to the company that can be caught in the state. The banks claims that the company is indebted to it in die sum of under a contract with the defunct Indianapolis car works, the bonk hay- Ing cashed the company's paper, then in the hands of Millard. Tho steps taken yesterday were for the purpose of forcing the to defend the suit in this state. COTTON MILLS BURNED. Narrow JSneape of the Employe! and Sev- eral Badly BuRUNOTflN, Vt., Feb. Bur- lington cotton mills, situated on the Bur- lington side of the river, at Winoogki, two miles north of here, weie burned this morning. The loss is in- surance, The flames spread so rapidly that the employes weie obliged to escape by ropea. In doing this John Tuylor was badly and per fatally burned. Nel- son Young was al-o badly burned and Joseph Portoin sustained a bad oat on his thigh by a full from a rope. Sparks from the burning building set fire to the lumber sheda of Edwards Stevens across the river and the flames from this place we e communicated to adjoining buildings The loss in the village of Winoosk' is Hounei Ueslroyml. EDINA, Mo., Feb. disastrous fire yesterday destroyed nearly the en- tire business portion of the town, caus- ing a loss of It started in a frame building on the west side of the public sunnie, and spreading to adjoin-. Ing buildings, finally e iveloped the whole The heaviest laers are J. Lyon, dry goods, i.OOO; C. J. B -um general merchandise, C. M. Brnm Company, grocers, and J. Bishop, boots and shoes, Work of an Incendiary. MBNDOSA, HI., Feb. Sunday night eight stores were burned in this place. The origin of the fire is supposed to have been incendiary. The loss will amount BO nearly Hyringer ft Graham, the leading merchants, lose Poatofllee Burned. BBAVER CROSSING, Neb. Feb. here yesterday destroyed the postofflce, town hall and four business houses. All the mail and postofflce records were burned. Low THE M'KINLEY BILL. Judge Blodfett Renderi a Deelnlon In the Marshall Field Cue. CHICAGO, Feb. Blodgett decided case of Marshall Field Company against John M. Clark, collec- tor of customs, involving the validity of the McKinley bill. He said: best disposition the court can make of the matter is to affirm the de- cision of the appraisers at New York and allow the case to go directly to the supreme court. I will tay, however, that the court was much impressed with the chain of reason advanced by the appellant and it might be difficult for the argument to be met by the other side. However, the McKinley bill has become the operating mechanism by which the government collects its duties and an adverse decision in this case might seriously disarrange the existing arrangement of this (service. There should be a finding of faojte that this court found the case of sufficient im- portance- to warrant an appeal to the su- preme court." An appeal will be prayed at once. Mall Bags Stolen. BURLINGTON, Iowa, Feb. mail bags were stolen from a truck in the Union depot yesterday evening. Only one pouch contained letters. The theft was not discovered for several minutes, during which time the robber made his way to a yard in the rear of the depot, where he cut open the sacks. He then escaped in the darkness. The amount stolen is not known. Prise Fighter Fined anil Jallod. CROWN POINT, Ind., Feb. Ryan, who recently defeated Danny Needham at Minneapolis, was lined and costs yesterday by Judge Johnston for engaging in a fight with Bartlett last Deceuil er in this state. Ryan was unable to pay, and lies in jail in default of payment. Death of a Retired Navjr Officer. BALTIMORE, Feb. Charlei Thomas, a retiied officer of the United States navy, brother of ex-Governor Thomas, and for many years a compan- ion of the late Admiral Porter, died last night. He entered the naval service in 1829._______________ Black! Off for Oklahoma. LITTLE BOOK, Feb. exodus oi negroes for Oklahoma from Arkansas u in progress. Monday night one hundred left Pnlaski county, via Texarkana, and next Saturday 500 more will leave, and the end is not yet. A Sudden Drop In Temperature. KANSAS CITY, Feb. cold wave from the northwest arrived here at noon yesterday and before evening sent the thermometer down from 70 degrees to II degrees zero, a fall of 55 degrew, Both the Elliott. Shot Oiborne, While Was Killed bj a Bullet from W. J. Elllolf. Two Prlsonen Charged With Murder In the First Degree. COLUMBUS, O., Feb. awful tragedy of Monday, in which W. L. Hughes and Al. C. Osborne lost their lives and five men were wounded, is the sole topic of conversation on the streets, in the hotel lobbies and in the saloons. While a tew, who always have an "I told you ao" story after an event of this character, now confidently state that they the newspaper war between The World arid Capital would end in bloodshed, still the prevailing opinion all along has been that the main fight would be made through the respective newspapers. Osborue, however, seemed to have a premonition of his impending fate. Monday morning he was down town, armed and watchful. He was also very nervous, and would start and glance over his shoulder ac any sound. He had heard reports that Bill lUnott was hunting him Sunday morning and laughing nervously said that Bill "knew where to find hiiu if he wanttd him very badly." Atier Jeav ing Butt's saloon and restaurant, wliere Levo.ing took dinner, he walked back to Schroder's. He was so nervous that 'Squire McDonald ad-, vised him to talie something to brace him up. He did so nd stepped from the door. He no; been gone five minutes when the shooting occurred. The United Press yesterday met a young man, J. W. Lincoln, who was an Intimate friend of Al. Osb >rne, a d from him learned that the deceased had momentarily expected death, and had made a final disposition of his posses- sions. On last week he made his will, and hod sponen to tin, young man as to how he wished his remains cared for. "For.' said he, when reproved for his levit--, "I expect trouble with the Klhottfl if we meet, though I cannot say just what kind." He ordered that this young man take his body from the coroner as soon as through with it, and have it placed in charge of Tom Doonan, the by the was Osborne's friend, and until a year ago. foreman on The Capital. He further desired that his body be taken to the home of his sister, Mrs. Mason, and that later they be given interment at Reynoldsbnrg. This conversation between Lincoln and Osborne took place last week. They again met Monday noon near Schraders saloon, jest after Osborne had been yeighed on the scales and measured. .lincoln addressed him as follows: "Al, _ guess we had better put that casket which we had for yon back in its place, or you don't seem to need it." Osborne mmediately answeied: "This is traight goods and no joking. The day s not over, and I may need the coffin >efore night." With that the two jarted. There was a good deal of talk on the street yesterday regarding the course >ursued bv the police in not locking the >wo murderers in cells as soon as ar- Chief Murphy was asked why was not done. Said he: "I did not ock the Elliotts up for two reasons, jtrst, the attorneys, lejjuia.le men at ,he bar, requested that they be taken to ny office so that a consultation might held, and second, I wished the re- xirters to secure all the facts and state- nents thev could about the affair. I lave often done thin and would do it for any body if so requested in a case of ;h.s kind." The police have established beyond a a doubt that Bill Elliott fired the first shot and they think that both the Elli- otts shot Osborne. It is impossible to lee the prisoners without an order from the chief, this being given should any one have important business with the men. The outside and inside doors are locked so as to pi event trouble should a mob organize, as there have been threats of so doing. At 10 o'clock yesterday the coroner, with Drs. Frank Warner, li. F. Wilson and J, F. Baldwin, began a postmortem examination upon the bo .lies of Editor Osliorne and old man Hughes. It was mown tnat the bullet Osborne received In the head was from the revolver used byW. J. Elliott, and the one through iiis lungs fiom the .revolver of his brother Patrick. It was also shown that the bullet which killed Mr. Hughes was from W. J. Elliott's revolver. Clarence Reed, a young man living near Elliott's home at Arlington, says that Elliott was practicing with his pistol Monday moining He saw him, he says, shooting at a target. At the conclusion of the practice he got into his buggy and drove toward the city. Ed. Osboine has filed an affidavit against W. J. and P. J. Elliott, charg- ing them jointly with murder in the first degree in the killing of A. C. Osborne. The affiant is the piesent mayor of Reynoldsburg and a brother of the deceased. He says he proposes to push the prosecution. In addition to Mr. Huling an array of distinguished and able lawyers will be employed to prosecute the case. A large number of witnesses have been examined by Coroner Eagan in the inquest on the bodies of the two murdered men. Nearly all the wit- nesses swear that W. J. Elliott began the fusil ade by firing upon Osborne, who stood with his hands in his pockets less than ten feet away, and that the first shot took effect in Osborne's chin. It was further testified that W. J. Elliott took refuge behind a woman and fired over her shoulder, aud that at this juncture Hughes dropped dead. Oa- borne in the meantime letreated to the hat store followed by Pat, where he re- ceived his death wound in the heart. of the St. LonlK Hi ST. Louis, Feb. Von der Abe, in an interview, gives the make-up of the St. Louis Browns as fol- lows: Boyle, Munyan and another mar yet unsigned, catchers; Stivetts, Neal King, pitchers; Comiskey, Egan and Lyons, on the bases; McAleer, Hoy and McCarthy, in the field, and Fuller at short. _______________ One Boy Another. MEMPHIS, Feb. Forsyth shot and killed another boy named John Pkkett at the race track last night in row over a lamp. Both were white boys employed in Newsom's stable. Forsy A bits been guested. THREE DAYS' STORM. Great Damage Done to Alone the Pacific Const. SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. days of storm have done almost unprecedented damage to California railroads and paralyzed travel in nearly all directions. The Central Pacific is the only line run- ning on time. The greatest damage was done in southern California and Ai izona. In Soledad canon, near Los Angeles, the entire track was swept out for 200 feet. More than a dozen bridges are gone near Los Angeles. On the Atlantic and Pacific washouts are very bad and several bridges are gone. On the Colorado desert the Southern Pacific has sustained heavy damage. Cn Lythe cieek, near ban Bernardino, the water rose so radidly hist night that all the ranchers fled to the city, bringing only a few of the r most valu ble articles. eral houses iu San J'rancisco and Berkley were blown down last night by the wind, which hud a velocity of fifty miles per hour. Cloud nu In Arizona. HoLBROOJf.Ariz., Feb. was a regular cloud burst at San Carlo t, Aiiz, yesterday. Two aud one-half inches of rain fell in six hours, and six inches time Tuesday. The Gila ri-, er is booming higher than ever known. The ndlan farms and ditches are all desiroyed. The agency four mill ib partly inn. d.ited and its machin- ery ruined. The mill is liable to go down stream at any morn nt Tne agency miller, William Cornell, and family, nailowly escaped fiom drown- ing. His house and contents were washed away, and he had to wade ueck deep to the tshoie with his wife and babies. THE COKERS' STRIKE. A Conflict Between Striken aud Non- Nnrrowlv Averted. SCOTTSDALE, Pa., Feb. conflict between the etiikers and uon-stiikers at tho coke plants near Dawson was nar- rowly averted yesterday. A crowd of strikers came down to get the men in the Frost Hill, Paull, and liamey plants to stop work. Many of the strikers in liquor and mostpf them were armed. The employes at work at the mines fled precipitately upon the ap- proach of the mob. No actual conflict occurred. At a mass meeting yesterday the TOO coke workers of the Loyalhanna, Monastery and other Latrobe works were ordered to strike. The frost Bill and Paull plants of W. J. Ramey are still running. The works are heavily guarded by Pinkerton men. At Mt. Pleataut yesterday strikers marched to Ihe Moorewood coke works where a number of men were working by the day and compelled them to stop work. _______________ TO DISCOURAGE WHITE CAPISM. An Important Measure Introduced In the Indiana IJOHANAPOLE, Feb. Senator Oil- man has introduced a bill to discourage White Capwm. It provides that any >erson who is damaged or injured by White Caps may reeo.er damages from ;he county in which the ct Oi'curs. Jii case a man is whipped he shall re- ceive damages of not less" than ior more than and a woman who s whipped by White Caps may recover rom to damages. If be proved that the persons who >erform any act of White Cubism live n more than one county, the various counties from which they come shall share in the payment of such damages as are awarded. for a Prlxe Fight. SAN ANTONIO, Feb. Jims and t'arn Ee.-l.ner, well known sporting men of this city, announce hat thev will give a purse of 'or a hgn to a hnish with skin-tight or ounce giove-i. between Bob Fitisimmons and Jim Hail, of Australia, the fight to ;ake pla' e in San Antonio dm ing the ast week in October or the first week in November. They guarantee protection, and will depo jt as toon as the match is ma e with either Dick Roche, >f St. Louis, or .Luke Short of Fort Worth, and two weeks befoie the fight will deposit the full amount with either of the abjve named. Brntal Tieatiurnt From a Sea Captain. PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 25. John O'Keefe, aged 42, employed as a steward on the steamer Helms ey, died at the loepitiil here 5 esterday, from the eftec s >t injuries which ihe man alleged we e ntticted by the captain of his ship, T ie man said be had been kicked by the ;aptain, but did not say when or where t happened. III It. Sioux CITY, Iowa, I'eb. Alliance men in Iowa, Minnesot', tne Dakotas and Nebraska will hold a con- ference here, beginning Wednesday next. It i fflee to the e fleet that the penitentiary nvestigation is a failure and is about to be abanoued was premature. The nvestigating committee is just coming nto a paying lead. The only charges hat bave not panned out fully were those against Warden Dyer. The war- den was not the most successful and efficient official the Ohio penitentiary ever had, but he is a great deal better than some of the disappointed Democratic politicians would like to make him out o be. The charges against Warden Dyer seem to have been prompted argely by a desire to shift ty from tbe shoulders of men superior o him in rank, and the attempt prom- sea to be a failure. The committee ias found some very startling evidence as to the granting of paroles. An old convict named Buch waiter, who re- cently received a parole, tells a very startling story. Buchwalter is an ex- soldier and had about 1700 which came to him in the form of a pension. Dyer's spn-iu-law, Thompson, a would-be at- torney, beard about this money and seems to bave made up his mind to possess it. According to Buchwaiter's statement be approached the convict with a proposition to secure his parole Tor a stipulated sum. Prominent at- lorneys had attempted to secure a parole for the man bjuhonorable means, but had failed. Thompson took hold of the case aud strange to say succeeded in getting a parole. Alter secur ng the parole he offered to get the old man a pardon for a certain amount and has been keeping i client closely housed 'or fear he would run nto some one connected with the prison investigation. Buchwalter stajed iu tbe house a few days aud then did run into some one who told be members of ihe committee all about the case. FREIGHT WRECK. rive Oil TaiOu. Watt VnlgM Can Four ASHLAND, Pa.. Feb. diaaateout wreck occurred oa the Beading near Gordon station at yesterday evening, completely demolishing fire oil tanks, fiur freight can and four powerful engines. A coal train started out from Locust Sommit, and when a short distance this side of Barry a coop- ling broke, causing a split in the train, A flagman was sent out to stop ap- proaching trains, while the, coal proceeded to Gordon. Following the coal train came three empty andtheroad being blocked by the can ahead, they had to await then- removal. The flagman of the third and rearea- gine was sent back the road to nag an- other train following. He bad not gone far whea the freight came In sight. gave the warning, bat owing to the heavy grade, the train was unable to slack off and wait crashing into the three engines and can. The wreck im- mediately took Die, and a few miaatae later the five oil exploded, throw- ing the debris in every direction. The engineer of the freight and several of the crew were badly braised, though not seriously, injured by jumping from their traia. The loss to the company is mated at f Declam la Tax C-ae. COLUMBUS. O., Feb. the caw of the State of Ohio in relation of Mor- ganthaler versos O. D. Critee. auditor of Allen county, it was decided by the supreme court fat favor of the plaintiff yesterday morning. This is the case in which the county seeks to recover a Urge aum of back taxes alleged by the tax inquisitor to be due from Senator- elect Brioa. Under the decision omftfeA taxed amounting to eeverml dollars will have to be paid. Si. CBARLBB, Mo., Feb. great pontoon bridge spanning the Missouri river at this point raited at the draw about 11 o'clock yesterday morning. The big draw cables parted leaving the draw tlose into the east bank wrecking and sinking six or seven pontoooa. Ihe wind is blowing hard and river rapidly rising and it is feared the entire bridge will be wrecked. The damage will reach close to flO.OOO. BROKE HIS NECK. I CANTON, O., Feb. Monday I night Edward CaUahan, the Adams ez- press agent at Salem, was sandbagged, i while returning home from hu and left insensible. The robbers them returned to the ofi.ce and rifled the cafe of and seve al watches. CaUahanli injuries are severe, bat he may recover. There is no clew. Curdln tl Olhtunu Xnt to j BOMB. Feb. statement nab- liBhed in Itolie yesterday that Cardinal Gibbons had been summoned to BOOM t for a conference on church qnestioM m the United btate. is denied in Vatican circlis. It i, also stated that there fa question pending which would require his presence iu Rome. Two bishcw from the United States are expected here at Caster. Prlao Plcht In Dave nevlllo 'KlllxTom Traeey, of COLUMBUS, Feb. United was a prize fight at Nel- souville, Athens county, last night be- tween Dave Seville, of this city, aud Tom Tracey, of Toledo. When time was called for the nineteenth round Tracey, who was getting the worst of It, came for- ward saying: "I can't see any longer, hit me if mi want whereupon Seville smashed him In the jaw break- ing Ilia neck. This Seville M-dT-mi Macey, one of his seconds wore placed under arrest here. ftannle Mrmorlala for Wllann. WASHINGTON, Feb. United the senate to-day, the chap- lain, in his prayer, feelingly alluded to Ihe death of Senator Wilson, of Mary- land, which occurred last night. After eulogies or the ddceased, by Senators Gorman and Spooner, the senate ad- journed until 11 a. m. to-morrow. A Blc strike LONDON, Feb. union men, numbering 5.000, have Mea ordered by their council to strike to- morrow. The step is supposed to be taken as a means of compelling other labor unions to declare themselves. TliuiKamU of Looau LONDON, Feb. 96. Stagnation fa _ gpieading to an alarming extentia the industry of bast LancMhiya, Ten thousand looms and operatives l are idle in Blackburn akue. I Aboat to I SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. from 'ua emal sa> President Baril- la hiistu-ide all arrangements the country, lie ha- sold his coffee foi t e ueit three -.ears ior --.WO ca b, '661 e whic i he sas mortgaged bit eiiii e fs'a.ei f r fcj a German syndicate, ao that in case he is f rx-ed to e the country his cann toe to- ched. Barillas is said to fear an out- burst of pop lar resentment against his rule aud to be s repared for eight at any moment has a ue -t egg v f OOU deposited in the Bank of l-ngmad The Government Baking Powder Tests. The latest investigations by the United States and Canadian Governments show the Royal Bak- ing Powder a cream of tartar powder superior to all others in leavening strength. Statements by other manufacturers to tfie con- trary have been declared by the official authorities falsifications of the official reports.   

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  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

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