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Lima News Newspaper Archive: February 24, 1959 - Page 1

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   Lima News, The (Newspaper) - February 24, 1959, Lima, Ohio                               NEWSPAPER There no duty we jo underrate as the duty of being happy. L. Stevenson THE LIMA NEWS YOJUK FREEDOM NEWSPAPER Cold Partly, cloudy and a little colder today, high 32-36. Fair and colder tonight, low 20-21 Fa'ir and warmer Wednesday. Maximum 1 p.m...............4t Minimum temperature it 7 121 E Hizh St. Phone CA J-1010 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS (16 PAGES TODAY) TUESDAY, FEB. 24, 1959, LIMA, OHIO VOL. 75 NO. 55 (ShVEN CENTS) Second Mall Privitem Authorized Al Lima. QUO PROUD PARENTS Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Ven- nekotter, of Glandorf, (left) visit with their daugh- ter, Mrs. Joseph Recker. who Saturday. bore their 44th grandchild in St. Rita's Hospital. This was Mr. and Mrs. Recker's llth child. All except one of the Vennekotter's grandchildren were born in St. Rita's which Mr. Recker (right) says is a record for the hospital. News Photo) Legislators Argue Scooter Proposal Findlay's Penny Gets New Heart iracle' Operation Performed On Girl, 3 John By BOB PENDERGAST Lima News Staff Writer FINDLAY The miracle heart- here was awake and with her parents just six hours after mem- bers of a Cleveland Army Nike jlung machine kept life first rolled up their sleeves [through the body of a little three- ivcar old Findlay girl Monday at 9 a.m. Monday. The soldiers volunteered their while her heart was salvaged for the crucjai operation a skilled Cleveland medical team. after ;t had been postponed two 'itics The wonder machine, which 1 keeps fresh blood flowing through ithe veins and the breath of life weeks earlier and 17 donors had made a fruitless trip to Cleve land and given that number of iin a patient's lungs, was a silent [pints of fresh blood for the hos- By WILLIAM THEFS United Press International member of the Marymount Hos- pital team, which stopped and re- ipaired the little heart of Penny pital blood bank. The surgery had to be post- poned on the Feb. 9 date, because By HENRY SHAPIRO United Press International on Berlin and Germany. He said (Khrushchev's "little I it it would be "unbusinesslike" talks with Prime Minister Harold! WASHINGTON (UPI) Senate jStiner. member of the 11-man opera- Leader Lyndon B. I The three-year-old team, headed by Dr. John summit Jj0hnson brushed off a fellow daughter of a Coop-iKralik, suddenly became ill. MOSCOW (UPI) Soviet Pre-j-'unacceptable." mier Nikita S. Khrushchev today turned down the West's proposals on Berlin and nuclear test sus- pension. Speaking ai an election rally, j West relations. Khrushchev flatly rejected last1 The speech appeared to blast week's Western "call for a Bigjhopcs of a new approach to Four foreign ministers conference 'German stalemate just Macmillan of Britain had created fresh hopes. Will Continue Tests Khrushchev scored the Western He called anew for full and formal summit talks to decide the German question, nuclear te.st stand at the Geneva nuclear con- bans and the whole field of East-1 ference. jocrat's attack on his leadership I er Rubber and Tire Co. employee 'tactics today with the studied si- lence of one who has the votes- land knows it, I Friends said Johnson, now in Texas suffering a touch of flu. jp r o b a b I y would ignore the ne H who charged that typi- ical Democratic senators have to do" with setting their "We regret it but we shall program_ to continue with our (nuclear) j. 4. u jj A But there was no doubt tests too, he added. that sav Proxmire had touched a spot sen- j Khrushchev sa.d a conference jsitive fo_ Democrats who jof foreign ministers as complained thev I by the West to thresh out thcu r. 'problems of Berlin, Germany ant''affajrs Overall European security could j' 'last for manv months or years. Unhappy Over Appointments "It would be more expedient if Proxmire conceded he was un- ithe Western powers agreed on a happy because two freshmen Dem- COLUMBUS (UPI) New fuel! Hook suggested the licenses 0{ heads of govern-1 ocrats were given prized spots on for the proposed two-cents-a-gal-jpire on a specific date, insteadiment which could make deci-jthe finance committee this year. Ion boost in the state gasoline on the driver's birthday. ;sions, was added Monday when the' Rep. Jesse Yoder (D-Montgom- he said. Hits At U.S. I even though he outranked them in seniority. But he said this was "not principally" the matter which chairman of the House House majority leader. his blast at Johnson. Committee endorsed the plan. ]posed a S3-5 fine for any dr'verivakia, which he described as "the! "I just became convinced there' Rep. George M. Hook Jr. (D-jwho lets his license expire and _____ jwas an uneasy feeling on the part! Brown) told a Democratic applies for a renewal (See SOVIETS on many Democratic senators that! 1 they were obligated to the leader- Committee meeting his own re- search supports the report of Gov. Michael V DiSalle's special cab- inet committee. He said to fi- nance a 300 million dollar-a-year highway program, 26 million less than last year's, would require: two-cent hike in the five- cent state gas tax, bringing in nearly 30 million dollars a year. S5 increase in the autoj license plate fee. good for Jimmy down- er 15 million dollars. T nlotto is Just a -Year-Old Soy Asks Ohio Mot to Stevens Promoted At Sohio Donald G. Stevens, manager with her parents and Donors Supplied After the incident, the hospital told the Findlay Red Cross that it would supply blood donors in ithe lakefront city for the vital operation to correct the little youngster's tell-tale heart. The machine, built and perfect- ed over the last five years, needs fresh blood taken on the spot to keep its life-saving apparatus run- ning. It was pioneered by several eminent surgeons and perfected by two Clcvelandcrs, Dr. Earl B. I Kay of St. Vincent Hospital staff and Dr. Bernard Cross of St. Luke, two of the city's four big heart hospitals. With 20 pints of blood funneled into the heart machine, it stood silently by watching some of med- icine's most expert hands seek out and arrest the defect that threat- ened to Snuff out Penny's life with- in the next five years. Her parents had known about th'. heart defect since she was five j week old and a family doctor had 1 watched her closely ever since to i determine when the time would ibe right for the "must operation." 1 Since last fall she had paid sev- eral visits to the big Cleveland Pennv And Her Sisters much so that they were1 he said. "I decided that! the only way to do anything about; manufacturing division the Feb] 9 date was sct_ it.' JSohio's Petrochemical Depart-; The Red Cross organized the The Wisconsin senator said hisjmcnt' Lima Refinery, today donors as the organiza. next speech, dealing with the cf- named of the had three months carlier for feet of senatorial "surrender" the policy committee. COLUMBUS (UPI) a replacement have been in about two weeks. Si annual driver's i j ,1 T r j strode into the Legislature today i license; Builds Up Attack truthful! Proxmire began the buildup for (two-year-old Rusty Breyman The announcement was made I Nov. 6. by Edward F. Morrill. vice prcsi-j After the operation had been re- dent for petrochemical of Stand-1 set for Monday, the Clevelan ard Oil. j hospital said that it would secure! Group May Censure Court Schools May Give Licenses By WILLIAM E. TANGNEY United Press International COLUMBUS compro- mise bill in a hot dispute over 14 and 15 year old motor scooter drivers was ready for introduc- tion in the Legislature today. Rep. Richard B. Metcalf (R- Franklin) was to propose that the state get out of the controversy altogether, by allowing local boards of education to issue scoot- er licenses to selected children. Meanwhile, the House got its first look at the long-awaited util- ity rate law revision bill, and the Senate considered a stiff point system to be used against taverns for liquor law violations. Hearings also were scheduled for tonight on Supplemental Un- employment Benefits, movie cen- sorship, pre-school polio shots, quail hunting arid minimum beer prices. Scooter Control Localized Metcalfs idea is to let each school board license young scooter drivers much as it now gives out work permits. "A local board would make its decision on the basis of the ap- plicant's scholarship, cooperation with school officials, mental atti- tude, responsibility, and attend- ance he said. Some police officials and the PTA have demanded repeal of the 1 year-old Junior Licensing Law, which lowered the minimum age for driving under-five-brake-horse- power cycles from 16 to 14. Scoot- er who now get most of their trade from the youngsters and many parents and insurance spokesmen are hotly contesting the demand. Metcalf said his bill recognizes that scooters are often "essential transportation for many boys and girls in small towns and in subur- iban and rural areas. 'However, if the traffic condi- tions are especially hazardous, as for instances they may be in Cuy- ahoga County, the board could ex- ercise Control by refusing to grant certificates." Utility Change Asked The utility rate bill would elim- inate the "reproduction cost new. less depreciation" (RCN) formula for determining a utility com- pany's rate base. The Public Utilities Commission must use the RCN formula, which calculates how much it would cost to replace a company's facilities at present prices, less depreci- On Johnson when hej 1 rtllllUdl 111 I I -1 I IV.V. 1 I j J J 1 J I V.I...... M v fee instead of for a tllat end Its "I thought it up from readingjcomplaincd two weeks ago engineer ice insiucKi 01 iui o um-i, .....-0..... license, adding 4-5 million years of stalling and adopt a the Bible schoolbooks." CHICAGO usually-Albert H. Janncr said. "This The PUC allows the com- staid American Bar Association try existed long before there was J pany a profit, usually 4-6 per cent, readied for an all-out floor fightjCommunism and will exist longjon that base. over whether the j Critics of RCN say it often gives lawyers should call the U.S. Su-j The dispute came just threejthe company more profit than it c Court soft on Communism, irfays after the association official- would get on an actual investment Stevens joined Sohio in 1941 asithe donors at no expense to the' the company's! Cross or Penny's parents and At issue before the ABA's pol- Iv accepted the resignation of n seniority system's service division, and call went out to Nike unit two-cent jump in the motto. I diesel fuel tax. producing about jjnimyi son of a Cincinnati is chosen, just so j Valentine weekend of Feb. 14 A rmiimn rlnllarq a vrar i V j u r .u c I Ohio cets one. "But of course.T'd shot another barbed arrow in a 4 million ooiiars a (tender, testified before tht _ u ._ The rwlicv committee took noj He said he won't be unhappy if I of Senate committees. Then on the vanced to chief of that division! members, who daily guard the mthpr slnoan k IIKT" wrrk-pnrf of Feb. 14 he; in 1949. vast Lake Erie shoreline and giant In October 1954. when construe-; industrial complex of Ohio's great- icy-setting House of Delegates was Chief Justice Earl Warren, a! The new bill, introduced by Rep. me policy Governmcnt Committee in d official action on Hook s report. r ne said. llke to see them choose mme' But it was considered just that much mo.e likely that DiSalle will to: "With God request these increases in his i Possible." budget message next week. filmed television program which: jtion was started on Sohio's big jest city. the fact that South ;petrochemical plant in Lima, he Relatives Hear Word whether to approve recommenda-jmember for 28 years. ABA Presi-j Frances McGovern (D-Summit) lions of its committee on Commu-ident Ross L. Malone emphasized'and three others, would allow the nist tactics, strategy and severance "was in no PUC to use any formula it wants lives calling for "remedial leg is- way connected with non-payment lation" to counteract recent of dues." defense of his own proposed mot- Jimmy said he's against a Latin erncrs dominate Senate committee; was named plant manager. All Things Arc motto. He wants one in jso people can understand it. thatj Johnson's personal The :rew-cut sixth grader pre-Sput him at odds with Sen. through his chairmanship sented a sheaf of more than 1.800 petition names he has gathered in the year since he looked into his new set of encyclopedias and found Ohio is the only motto-less state. On one petition is the sig- FT. BRAGG, N.C. j nature of former Gov. C. William eral of the Army George C. Mar-1 O'Neill. Marshall Still Seriously 111 shall, his recovery from a series of two strokes complicated by a pituitary gland condition, re- mained seriously ill today at the Army's Womack General Hospital. Doctors said Monday that Ihc pituitary gland "involvement" had weakened the 78-year-old soldier- statesman who had suffered a second stroke last week. They said the gland trouble appeared in "definite increase in water out- put by way of the kidneys." The pituitary is a gland attached to the brain and secretes substances "If you adopt the motto the peo- ple of Ohio would have before them at aK times an inspiration to work and live by." Jimmy fdmitted he got help for his presentation from Sen William H. Deddens who introduced the youngster's idea as a bill. But Deddens said the whole thing was started by Jimmy, who enlisted the senator's support by telephone. Ohio adopted "Impcrium in 1m- perio" Kingdom within a king- dom as its motto in 1866, but which raise and lower blood it two years Inter. Ever 'since then, hundreds or proposals Fess (R-Yellow both policy and steering com asked the Committee to return to mittees and the majority leader "Imperiun- in Impcrio." I ship. When operations started in 1955. he was named manager of the nanufacturing division. Stevens was graduated as a echnical chemical engineer from Syracuse University in 1938. news of Penny awake andiSupreme Court rulings on Com-j talking with her mom and dad after the operation reached the lit- tle southside Findlay home late Monday afternoon where grandfa- (See PENNY on Campanella 's Son In Gang Fight NEW YORK Cam- panella, 15, whose baseball star father has been a leader in the fight against juvenile delinquency was under arrest today for being involved in a gang fight. David, the son of former Dodger catcher Roy Campanella, was held m the Bronx Youth Shelter overnight on juvenile delinquency charges. His mother failed to get Itim released Monday night be- cause of a tussle with a newspa- per photographer. Young Campanella was one of 18 youths picked up by police Monday as they squared off in confined to a broke his camera and beat Queens vacant lot in a racial grudge fight. Police broke up the battle before anyone was hurt. Leader 01 Gang He wtfs reported to be a leader of a gang which had issued a dial lenge to a group of white youths over territorial exclusion from a bowling alley. His father, who io chairman of a special juvenile delinquency committee for the Knights of Pyth ias' March of Youth program, was at (he Dodgers winter training] from injuries received 13 months ago in an auto accident, is an adviser to the Dodgers. Young Campanella's mother, Ruthe, arrived at youth house to gain release of David, but was told she must get a clearance from police. As she left the youth detention center one of two men escorting her objected to photographer Jack Baumohl, of the Now York Mirror, taking her picture. Baumohl said camp at Vero Beach, Fla. Cam-jthe man threw him over a car him. Warns Of "Bashing" Mrs. Campanella warned Mirror reporter Philip Pollock to stay out of the fray. "You get away or you will get bashed, she was re- ported saying. Baumohl swore out a warrant for the arrest of the man, known only as Dallas, on assault charges. Mrs. Campanella and her escorts failed to seek clearance for Da- vid's release from police after leaving youth house in a late mod- el Cadillac. mumsts. The recommendations ran into an unexpected snag Monday when the 246-deIcgate house, represent- ing more than members of the legal profession, voted to hold off its decision 2'! hours "for (further study." Cites Court Verdicts The 10 member committee, headed by Peter Campbell Brown, one-time chairman of the Subver- sive Activities Control Board, is- sued a 50-plus page report citing 2-! Supreme Court verdicts "illus- trative of how our security has been weakened." House Delegate Arthur J. Freund of St. Louis, Mo., charged, however, the report was "not worthy of the American Bar As- sociation." It was Freund who moved the report be tabled until today, when the house winds up its two-day midyear session. "I do not feel the Supreme Court has acted wrongly on any senior delegate Full Probe Expected In Ohio Racing COLUMBUS -A full- scale investigation of the Ohio Racing Commission was expected to be asked today in the Legisla- ture. Rep. Raymond C. Motley CD- Butler) said he would introduce a hill creating a special seven- member team of lawmakers to probe the commission's activities with a appropriation. The commission has been under surveillance by Gov. Michael V. DiSalle, who has questioned the large number of racing days per- mitted in Ohio. Motley's bill would let the in- vestigators, appointed by the House speaker, subpoena records which show actual ownership of Ohio race tracks and horses. to arrive at a "reasonable aver- age return upon capital actually expended." i Such legislation has usually ibeen used to arrive at a net in- vestment base. Sen. Julius J. Petrash (D-Cleve- land) proposed the point system for liquor permit holders, as the latest in a series of "get tough" legislation against serving minors. Inside The Lima Amusements S Area News 5 Bridge 6 Classified 11-15 Comics Crossword 16 Deaths 2 Editorial Page Hospital News ...1 Dr. Jordan 7 Sports 12-1.1 TV Log...................... 8 Earl Wilson 8 Women II Your Birthday Classified Section SPAPESJ   

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