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Lima News Newspaper Archive: September 14, 1952 - Page 1

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   Lima News, The (Newspaper) - September 14, 1952, Lima, Ohio                                Showers gome etoudincM Sunday, Ufhnt in H'a. Chance of Mattered Sunday iftenMoa w aicht Mwndajr. tatwlur. M it I y. M. M at 4 NEWS FULL LEASED WIRE SERVICE OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS AND INTERNATION A L NEWS SERVICE J l Vol. 254 66 Pages Lima, Oh id; Sunday, September U, 1952 Fifteen Cents Section A WtM at railroad erMttaf tor a tonrvw. SCHUMAH PUNHERS PUSH UNIFIED EUROPE sft m Adlai Plans Swing Into New England Democratic Candidate Pleased With Prospects f hruout West By MARVIN L. ARBOWSMITH SPRINGFIELD, 111., Sept. 13 Adlai E. Steven- son returned to his presidential campaign, headquarters today, "well pleased" with his prospects in 10 Western states and .looking forward to a swing into New England, Virginia and Iowa. The Democratic candidate for the White House arrived here Report Police Closed Churches in Italy Late Summer Sun Continues To'Pour It On' New Heat Records Set- as 90-Degree Weather Prevails By The Associated Press The U. S. was a nation divide on the weather map but in the hotter areas researcher scurrying thru record book to see how many new marks wer being set. The late summer heat wave wa setting many kinds of record; hottest September days, hottes current date and most days ove 90 degrees for one summer. The hot spell that has liftec temperatures up into the. 90s a many points hung on in most o the states east of the Mississipp Kiver. The heat set'new records Sa1 urday in three large American cities. It hit 93 in New York fo the hottest Sept. 13 on record. An the temperature 97 in Baltimore, also a new high, for the date. THE MERCURY rose to 93 in mid-afternoon in Chicago. It was the 37th day this season when it go up to 90 or higher. The old recorc was 34 days established in 1944 An east-bound cool front was ex pected to lower temperatures. Sun day in Minnesota, Wisconsin anc Northwestern Iowa. Scattered showers fell along the Gulf Coast and in the Southeast Colorado, the Dakotas and West- ern Montana. There were also Cold spots, like the 23 degrees at Big Piney.-Wyo. and the 25 degrees at Bryce Can- yon, Utah. Red Propaganda Flow To Be Investigated CLEVELAND author- ities today said they would in- vestigate Communist propaganda which has been flooding into the Czechoslovakian colony here. Postmaster Joseph F. Prosser the 34-page booklets appar- ently slipped by postal inspectors charged with keeping' Soviet pro- paganda out of the'United States. The booklets mailed from Prague Czechoslovakia, in plain, yellow envelopes portray life in that na- tion as "a paradise." A spokesman for Czech news- paper here said many readers have called the paper about the book- lets and that "some of them don't realize the magazines are purely propaganda printed by the Com- munists." by plane from Albuquerque, N. M., at p. m. EST after a nine-day tour of the West in a bid for Nov- ember votes. Just before departing from Albu- querque, Stevenson's campaign manager, Wilson Wyatt, announced plans, for a foray into New land starting next Thursday. From there, the Illinois gover- nor will travel to a traditionally Democratic stronghold, Richmond Va., for a major address Sept. 20 On Oct. 4, Wyatt announced, Stev- enson will talk1 on farm policy at Ft. Dodge, la. As he set out for home from Albuquerque, Stevenson issued this statement on his nine- day swing through the West: "I AM delighted with my journey through 10 states. Everywhere the FBI Chief Warns U. S. Against 'Loose Talk' WASHINGTON, Sept. 13 director Hoover to- day urged Americans to guard against "loose talk" which might result in the disclosure of security information to the Communists. Hoover said this is one of the "acute" problems of the present mobilization program because people are generally less careless in their speech during an all-out war. crowds exceeded my expectations and their warmth and friendliness even surprised the local political leaders. "This trip enabled me to set forth my. views on a number of issues not previously covered, in accordance with my plan of ex- pressing- as clearly as I can my hopes'and ideas about, our future. "It would be.bold and foolish to express any. conclusions as to the political destiny of these states in November. "BtT I-AM-well pleased with the political situation of these states. Everywhere I found the Democratic party unified and en- thusiastic more so, ia- it has ihaiiy years. "And the, development of inde- pendent support for Spark- nan and myself in the major cen- ters was perhaps the most reas- suring circumstance of all." Sen. John J. Sparkman. of Ala- )ama is Stevenson's vice presiden- tial 'running mate. The Illinois governor's tour took lim 'into Colorado, Minnesota, Doming, Montana, Idaho, Wash- ngton, California, ".Arizona and New Mexico. He made 12 formal speeches, plus eight "whistle-stop alks on a one-day train swing hrough California's San Joaquin Valley. STEVENSON plans to remain in Springfield for a few days to clean up accumulated, state business, then take off on a new campaign wing along .the Atlantic Coast and nto the New England area. He announced today, he'll make tops Sept. in Bridgeport, New laven, New Britain and Hartford, Conn. He'll deliver a major ad- Iress the following day in Spring- ield, Mass., and make a number if as yet unannounced stops. On lept. 20, he'll deliver an evening peech at Richmond, Va., after, a stop at Quantico Marine Corps Base. He will appear in New York the ollowing Monday, Sept. 22 to ad- dress the American Federation of .abor Convention. CHURCH OF CHRIST missionaries, Cliner Paden (left) af Brownficld, Tex., and Carl Mitchell of Los' Angeles, said In Rome Saturday that the Italian police had closed the Church of Christ in Ales- sandria, by force. They said the police ordered the Rome church to close immediately. They art pictured here en route to the police station in Rome. lourt Order Holds Texas Battle Static AUSTIN, Tex., Sept. 13 xict Judge Jack Roberts today is- ued a temporary restraining or- er to prevent the name of the new 'exas Democratic party and its andidate, Eisenhower, from going the general election ballot in exas. The judge set a hearing in the ase for Tuesday at 9 a.m. Supporters of the Democratic residential nominee Adlai Steven- on filed the suit today. The suit, filed here in District Qurt by Austin attorney John ofer, asked a court order to pre- ent Secretary of State Jack Ross certifying the new party and s candidates for a place on the allot. Solicitor Asks Notice On Gas Rate Protests Communities served by the West Ohio Gas Co. were reminded Sat- urday by" City Solicitor Lee G. Van Blargan to notify him by Oct. 1 of their intenions in regards to prote'sting the firm's application for an increase in rates. Van Blargan, said he had mailed letters to officials of the other communities, informing them, that estimated cost for legal and engi- neering services will amount Justice Probe Gaining Speed McGrath, 'Caudle To Give Testimony WASHINGTON, Sept. 13 Justice Department is in line dur ing. the coming week for mor probing at the hands of House in vestigators, with two former toj men on call to answer question; at a public hearing. J. Howard'McGrath', ousted las spring from his Cabinet post as attorney general, is booked to tes- tify before a judiciary subcommit tee on Wednesday. And one of his trusted aides, T Lamar Caudle, who was fired by President Truman last November for "outside gets the spotlight on Thursday, assuming McGrath finishes in one day. ThE RANKING Republican member of the House judiciary subcommittee, meanwhile, made a quick visit amid much secrecy to an unnamed Eastern city. Rep. Keating (R-NY) declined to say anything about the trip except that it was (1) to a city "in the general direction of New York" and (2) to interview a key witness in a case previously untouched by the House investigators. Keating and Daniel G. Kennedy, a subcommittee counsel, made the trip by train. On the way to the station from the Senate office building, they talked with a man Keating described as "another witness." In addition to these developments another subcommittee member, Rep. Bakewell planned to examine department files on a 1946 Kansas City vote fraud case. GE Signs Wage Pact with UE NEW YORK, Sept. 13 sprawling General Electric Com- pany and the United Electrical Workers Union, (Ind) have reached contract agreement giving workers wage increases of 7% to 13 cents an hour. The present wage averages S1.75 an hour. In New York, L. R. Boulwarc, GE's vice president in charge of employe relations, said the same increase has been offered to about employes. Church Plans RiiesDespite ROME, Sept. 13 Ml A "deter- mined handful of American-led Church of Christ worshipers an- nounced tonight they will hold reg- ular services here tomorrow in open defiance' of an .Italian'police ban. Cliner Paden, of Brownfield; Tex., who heads the> churchi in Rome, said the ban was part of a "completely unexpected" nation- wide crackdown against the small Protestant group under laws of the Fascist era. In Alessandria's police headquar- ters, Dr. Michele Lomazzo said po- ice had prevented "an un author- zed gathering for religious prac- ices" by the Church of Christ last Sunday. He denied the use of 'orce. One of Paden's fellow missiona- ries, Carl Mitchell ot Los .Angeles, Calif., said the Alessandria police orcefully prevented 25 members of :he congregation from entering, the church, tore down the church sign and roughly handled four Church of Christ representatives in an ef- ort to make -them stop singing jymns. Official action appeared to be imited to the Church of Christ. Other Protestant denominations, in- cluding the Baptists and Metho- dists, have operated in Italy for 1 without official against them. action about and showing a per- centage breakdown for the vari- ous combination of cities and towns if they desire to participate. He made it clear, however, that other cities need not join financial- ly with Lima in the protest unless they so desire but he would like to know their intentions by Oct. 1. Lima has engaged the Columbus law firm of Dargusch, Caran, Greek and King and the Kcyscr, W. Va., engineering firm of Blun- Snyder and Small. If all cities share the cost, Lima still would pay approximately 62.8 per cent of the cost based on the gas company's sales in 1951. So far Wapakoneta, St. Marys, Kenton and Bluffton have indicated they expect to join with Lima with at least one of the towns receiving part of its funds thru contributions from private industrial plants. Onj the basis of those four sharing the cost, Lima's contribution would amount to 74.2 per cent; Wapako- neta, 5.9; St. Marys, 7; Kenton, 11.4, and Bluffton, 1.5. Searches Pressed For Fugitive Trio 2 States Beat Bush For Jailbreakers ALLENTOWN, Pa. Sept. 13 'roceeding on the assumption that hree fugitive Jailbreakers, heavily rmed and dangerous, are hiding ut in this Northeastern Pennsyl- area, state and local police nd FBI agents locked a tight lockade across all main roads to- ay in an effort to trap the men. All available state police were n duty. They were reinforced by he full assistance of local officers n many communities and a swarm f FBI agents. Civil Air Patrol lanes circled slowly over outlying reas at the foothills of the Pocono in a search for the ugitives. Maryland state and county police ;at through Blue Ridge Mountain underbrush near Pen Mar. Md., during the day, believing they James B. Carey, IUE-CIO pres- have surrounded the three heavily ident, promptly assailed the UE- armed bank robbers. Maryland State Police Capt. C. W. Magaha told reporters he believed two of the trio had just missed capture by a .police squad car crew, near the Pen Mar rail- way depot. The men are Joseph Nblen, 26, arid Ballard Nblcn, 22, his brother, both of 'Harlan County, Ky., and Elmer Schuer, 21, of Chicago. All were serving long terms for bank robbery at the time of their es- cape. They are known to be carry- ing shotguns and an ample supply of ammunition. FBI circulars de- scribe the men as "vicious" and "extremely dangerous." Royalty Boosts Aim of Lewis Wage Talks Proceed On Triple Front1 WASHINGTON, L.-Lewis was .reported today to be shooting for new welfare fund roy- alty boosts in both the soft coal and hard coal industries. It has been known for some time that Lewis was concentrating on a 20-cent increase in the hard coal, or anthracite, industry royalty, but it was believed, he might forego an increase in the soft coal royalty: Both branches of the coal.indus- try now pay 30 cents a ton on all production into union operated funds to provide pensions and other benefits for miners and their fam- ilies. Contract negotiations, conducted in unusual secrecy; have been pro- ceeding on three fronts. Lewis has been talking separately with the anthracite producers, with South- ern soft coal owners and with Northern soft coal producers. The contract talks are entering the showdown stage. A strike in Northern soft coal mines may come a week from Monday, on Sept. 22. That is the first day the miners could fail to report for work after an agreement expires on Sat- urday, Sept. 20. The agreements between Lewis' United Mine Workers and Southern soft coal mines, and between the union and .the anthracite producers end 10 days later, on Sept. 30. Ike Begins Battle For Midwest Votes GOP Nominee To take Crusade Thru 12 States in 12 Days NEW YORK, Sept. 13 Dwight D. Eisenhower ral- lied his workers behind him today for the beginning tomorrow of a circuit-riding "peace" crusade thru the politically-vital Midwest. Describing himself as only the spearhead of a movement for "honesty and integrity" in government, the Republican presi- dential nominee told volunteer porters that a crusading spirit wil go much further than political or ganization toward winning a vie tory in November. "I believe in organization but believe more in spirit and that i what I see here Eisenhow er told about 250 members of CiU zens for Eisenhower-Nixon, wh had gathered from aL' sections o the country to plan a get-out-the vote drive. Preparing .to depart tomorrow o a 12-day, ]2-state train tour, Ei senhower cast himself in the rol of a missionary taking the polltica gospel of peace and honesty in gov ernmcnt to the people at waysidi stops. HE WILL make 56 of these stops besides major appearances in SI Paul, Minn., DCS Moincs, la. Omaha, Neb., Kansas City, Mo. St. Louis, Mo., Louisville, Ky., Clh cinnati, Columbus and Cleveland O.. Wheeling, W. Va., Baltimore Richmond, Va. The GOP nominee told the vol unteer workmen he is only the symbol of a crusade aimed at re storing world peace and "honesty integrity and decency" in govern ment. Observing that. he sometime wonders why he. should "deserv such devotion, such commenda tion" as had been by th volunteer workers, Eisenhowe added: is justified, at all jt is onl because a name or an effort, thought or maybe a coni to symbolize for each of us'some thing that is bigger than a He said that he sometimes'shud (Turn to I'ajre 2-A, Col. Three) Irate Berliners In Near Clash With Red Troops BERLIN, Sept. 13 Soviet armored car, equipped with two machine guns and carrying six Russian soldiers, drove into the American sector today and almosl started a clash with irate West Berliners. U. S. military police escorted the vehicle back to the East zone bor- der after West Berlin police blocked its progress at Herzbcrg Square with a garbage truck and sealed off its retreat with -a Squad car. The Russians brandished their Tommy guns when a crowd gath- ered, booing and shouting, "Ivan, go home." West German police forced the crowd back to prevent a clash. GE pact as a "collusive arrange- ment." "GE has known all he added in a statement issued in Washington, "that UE would take whatever the company offered it, simply because it isn't at liberty to win'any more for its members." Carey said the independent un- ion gave up two paid holidays and. other benefits in the new agree- ment. Channel Swimmer Quits FOLKESTONE, England, Sept. 13 Of) Denmark's Jenny, Kam- mersgaarde, 33, lasted hours and 40 minutes in the cold English channel but had to give up her swim tonight. She quit three miles from France. Gridiron Scores Lima South 12; Sidney.7 Dennlxon St. Marys 37, Lima St. ROM 1.1 Engine Afire, Pilot Lands Plane Safely CARTERET, N. J., Sept. 13 WV- A blazing engine dropped out of a DCS twin-engine passenger plane on a test flight today, but the pilot guided the lopsided craft to a safe landing in a swamp nearthe New Jersey Turnpike. The plane trailed smoke and flames over this crash-conscious heavily populated area near Eliza- abeth, N. J., where three airliners crashed last winter with the loss of 119 lives. The three crewmen aboard pilot, co-pilot and engineer were uninjured. The fire was out when the plane came to a stop, its land- ing gear ripped off by a meadow ditch. An American Oil Company em- ploye who refused to be identified, said the plane was lying in high grass near the Rahway River "like (Turn to Page 2-A, Col, Three) Homes, Men's Styles Featured What's new in housing? What will Lima's well-dressed men be wearing this fall? Today's Lima News includes 10-page section marking the opening of National Ilt.nie Week. Section D contains four paces of men's wear news and pictures. Pope Assures Free World of Church Support Backing Pledged Europe Plans for Defense, Unifying VATICAN CITY, Sept. Pius XII announced tonight the full support of the Catholic church ,for current efforts U. unify and defend Western Europe and lashed out at complete pacifism and Communist-spon- sored "peace" groups. The pontiff asserted'that peace- ful nations threatened by aggres- sion "have both the right anc the duty to defend themselves." In a sharp attack clearly aimec at''Communist backed "peace' movements which oppose the Schuman plan, the NATO pact, the European army and other moves toward a federated Free Europe the' pope declared: "The church is realistic she believes in peace and twill, un tiringly. remind statesmen ,tha even today's most complicate! political and economic situations can be solved on a'friendly basis "On the other hand, the church must take notice of dark influ- jnces which have always operated in history. This is the reason why she distrusts every pacifist jropaganda where the word peace' is, abused .as for hidden purposes. "Those who, altho peaceful, are i Hacked have both the right and he duty to defend themselves. No state or group of states-can peace- ully accept political servitude or economic ruin." BUT AT THE same time, the jopc warned that unification must ollow a new outlook on national (Turn 2-A, Col. Six) Legislators To Work on Federation 'Age-Old' Dream Gets Initial Impetus Monday STRASBOURG, France, Sept. IS Schuman Plan Assembly turned itself into a constitutional convention here today to promote the age-old dream of a united Eu- rope. The legislators of the six-nation coal-steel pool, lifting their sights from industrial problems, decided to start work at ;10 a.m. Monday on a draft of a European federa- tion or The ?8 representatives from: that Parliaments of France, West Ger- many, Italy, Belgium, The Nether- lands and Luxembourg fixed March 10, 1953, as their 'deadline for finishing v the draft. f Tliis decision came in a slide indorsement of a resolution adopted by the foreign ministers of the six nations in Luxembourg last Wednesday, askingHhe; assera-. blyrricn to take up the task. The vote was 58-4. with two ab- stentions. f IV ACCORD with the foreign ministers' request, the assembly- men agreed to take in nine members three each from France, West Germany when they sit as a special ad hoc assembly in preparing the .unifica- tion blueprint- The French and Italian delegations, chose their ex- tra men 'mmediately; 'the' Ger- mans expected -to'' riame theirs Monday. This padding brings the total membership to 87, the number pro- vided in' the European Defense (Turn to Page f-'A, CoL Six) Soviets U. S. Blockaded Military Mission> BERLIN, Sept. 13 Bus- ilans accused the Americans to- night of imposing a blockade on he Soviet military mission: as- igned to operate in The Russians charged the Amer- cans confronted Soviet members f the mission in a threatening way and forced them to hand over ertain documents. U. S. European Army headquar- ers in Heidelbeig denied the So- net charge, saying that it "simply s not true." However, the Amer- cans said they would investigate. NATO Practice Battle Begins- Soviet Editors Throw Barrage COPENHAGEN, Denmark, Sept. 3 "battle of Bornholm" cgan tonight as the first war ames engagement of the North Ulantic Powers' "Operation Main- race." Joining of battle at 9 p.m. was nnounced in a the Admiralty. Bornholm is a Danish island in the Baltic Sea. The first big war games.prompt- drew the.fire of Moscow's edi- ors. The Soviet Army newspaper Red tar charged that the, exercise, Operation was ag- ressively aimed by the Pentagon t clamping control over the Bal- c, to the detriment of Russia and ther Baltic powers. Moscow dis- patches said the tone of the vitriol- ic attack indicated Russia may protest officially to Norway and Denmark, among the eight nations taking part. The large U. S. naval force in- volved had orders to stay out of the Baltic in order not to invite an incident with Russia. But the 13- day exercise includes an amphibi- ous landing in Denmark 'and a counterattack against "enemy" in- vaders of Northern Norway. Nor- way's northern frontier touches Russia. More than men, including U. S. sailors and Marines, are involved in the operation, along with 'Canadian, American, Belgltn, Dutch, French, Norwegian warships. Wonger Plans To Aid Prisoners Chinese Claim Defeat Of UN Invasion Force LONDON, Sept. Reuters dispatch tonight reported a ciaim by the New China news agency that North Korean and Chinese coastal defense units have thrown back a United Nations force which attempted a landing on Sept. 10 near Tanchong on the Haiju peninsula. News Briefs LEGHORN. Italy, Sept. 13 ONS) S. Arniy chief of staff Gen. J. Lawton Collins arrived in Leg- horn today to inspect the Army's logistical command. He con- ferred with Geri. George P. Hays, U. S. commander in Austria, and Gen. James M. Gavin, chief of staff to Adm. Robert Carney, NATO commander for Southern Europe. CINCINNATI, Sept. 13 IMS-Sen. Robert A. Taft (R-Ohio) told a re- porter tonight that aides are still working out a schedule of speeches for him to give in support of the Republican presidential candi- date, Dwight D. Eisenhower. LONDON, Sept. Tass, the Soviet news agency announced tonight the death of the Soviet deputy minister of the Interior, Vanyly Cherneshev. after a long illness. HOLLYWOOD. Sept. 13 chastened Walter Wanger, sub- dued by his 102-day jail sentence for the shooting of his wife's al- leged lover, walked out of jail a free man today and said "I'm re- turning to work at the movie studio immediately." Wanger, once Hollywood's "boy said he was looking for- ward to meeting his wife actress Joan Bennett, tomorrow but re- fused to answer any questions about a possible reconciliation. The famed movie producer said: "You'll have to ask Joan about that.1.' Of one thing Wanger was sure. He said the American penal system is the country's "No, 1 scandal." An Air Force sergeant, Ralph Hile, being released after a 100-day sen- tence for drunkenness and passing bad checks, nodded assent. Wanger said his incarceration had made him "painfully of the problems of convicts and that he planned to channel some of his labor toward aiding them with his "Phoenix plan" for reha- bilitation of prisoners. Wanger was sentenced to Jour months for shooting agent Jen- nings Lang, 39, in the groin last Dec. 13 as the agent stood talking to Miss Bennett in a Beverly Hills parking lot. He was released with, lime off for good behavior. Wanger Ends 102-day Sentence   

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