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Hamilton Daily Republican Newspaper Archive: June 3, 1895 - Page 1

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   Hamilton Daily Republican (Newspaper) - June 3, 1895, Hamilton, Ohio                                TUB WHOLE NO. soo. HAMILTON, OHIO, MONDAY EVENING, JUNES. 1895 A GAT LIEUTENANT ONE TENT. Asked a Spanish Bridalgo for His Daughter but Without Success. A QUARREL FOLLOWED And the Girls Vtathnr was ghot-A tional Cnoonatar "in old Telepeone War la Hews Wire. SPECIAL IV TELKGB4PH rO TUB RKPUBMCAlt. MADRID, June lieutenant in the CONDENSED NEWS Gathered fraai All Parti of Comtrjr by Tctofrapb. The drought and hot weather has seriously endangered Indiana" Another surplus has been flyurtd out for the month of June by the treasury J department. Indianapolis is threatened 'vith water famine as a result of the longed drought. The grand jury made a report demning the methods of running Terre Haute jail. The Chinese in Formosa are expected to desert their works soon as Japanese arrive. There are rumors in Washington that Melville E. Stone may succeed Secretary Gresham. Brice, Gorman and Whitney arc said to have organized to prevent Cleve- land's renomination. A firebug has made a confession in New York, implicating' about a dozen insurance adjusters. Argentine Republic is making- active BLEW UP. A Boatload of Nitroglycerin Ig- nited Near Parkersburg. A Loss of Nearly   at TOO on track for Xo i CATTr.E-Mjrket dull and weak Fair to good shippers. choice. I5.-.3. choice butchers. (4 extra. 15.10. medium butchers. I4.SO; common. slow. lower Itutchcn. W packers. H4344.U; good light. 91.40: common and roiu.-h. tl.IS34.40. VBAI. steady: fair to BooJ light. extra? common and 0034 25 SIICEP ASD Market dull anil lower. Good to choice, common to fair, lt.iiii.50. choice. Lambs- Market and extra. to choice. common to fair. 425. CHICAKO .lune I. quotations: Flour ttrm Winter pat- ents. spring t390jtl30. No 2 spring. SQiic. Xo. 3 snrinj: wheat. 71 No -.Ted. No. 2 corn Xo. No. S white. Xo. white. 314c; Xo. 2 rye. Xo. 2 barley. ilHftKC- about a quarter of a mile up. right op- posite this city, and in the midst of its factories, and near the leading busi- ness street, the boat was being b tee red into Keal's Kun, when an obstruction was struck, and the entire hundred or more cans of nitroglycerin exploded with terrific force. For six squares nearly every busi- ness house has suffered losa from to each. Several of the school buildings are badly shattered, the win- dows and doors being broken and twisted out of shape. Thousands of panes of glass are broken. The Metho- dist Episcopal church, the Catholic church, the Presbyterian church, the Episcopal, the courthouse, Kelly's foundry, Parkersburg mill and a large number of other establishments are badly damaged. So far as known, but one man, the one who was on the boat, was killed. Three houses across the were blown to pieces. The steamer Heath- erington and three barges are badly damaged. The force of the shock was felt for a mile. Chimneys were blown down and windows broken all over the city. Several ladies in a chapel were badly cut with glass. Scores of men and women have wounds of more or less seriousness. C It would not be surprising if the loss from Saturday night's nitroglycerin explosion far exceeded the estimate of S10C.OOO made in the earlier reports. Instead of 200 quarts letting go, it is stated that 800 quarts were in the skiff when the explosion occurred. To a stranger who did not know what had first impression would be that the town had passed through a bombardment. Along the river front there is not a building in which there is a whole window; not only is the glass gone, but the sashes are torn entirely out, while such a thing as a door is unknown. Of the 15.090 inhabitants it is doubtful if there are have not suffered some oss. and there is probably not a home n the city or suburbs where there has not been more or less destruction. L There has not a vestig-e of the cans containing the explosive nor of the skiff upon it was loaded when picked up. though maiiv pieces of flesh of Kobert Cosley. of Pittsburgh, the unfortunate man who was rowing the skiff, have been found miles from the scene of the accident. Tile cause of the exolosion is not LOOKS WARLIKE. anil Hraill May Coma Tha Troubla iircw Out of the ahootluf of an OIHcer. N'KIV YOISK. June Herald's special from liueuos Ay res says: The Official Gazette says a fight took place between Frensh marines and Kra- zilians on May 13. Lieut. Lumier ordered the imprisonment of Cabral. but the latter resisted, and shot Lumier. The French force ad- vanced to burn the village of Cabra- lo, but the lirazilians returned and compelled the French to retire. Two Brazilians and one Portuguese were taken prisoners by the retreating troops. The Brazilian declares that the French had no right to invade neutral territory. The episode, taken together with the many foreign com- plications, may cause the resignation of the minister of foreign affairs. Gen. Carvalho. The French minister has been ordered to make an emphatic pro- test. WAR HEROES Royally Entertained by the Busi- ness Men of Cincinnati. Among: the Distinguished Guests Are Lieut. Gen. James Longstreet. MaJ. Gens. Matthew C. Butler. Fltzhuch Lee, Beth and Conie front Every Section of South and Each Hat a National Reputation. OUR DEFICIT Only 94Y.000.OOO In 1 1 MoiittK-fayinents Deferred lo Keep It from Growing. Lived frith a Bullet in Brain. KFW YORK, June E. Scan- lan, of Evansvillc. Ind., who had car- rifid a bullet imbedded in his brain for fourteen years, died in Bellevue hos- pifal Sunday. Four inches of the brain had been cut through by the bul- let1, which had remained in a small sac in the left hemisphere since 1881. On Scanlan had a fit and fell from a wagon, the fall reopening an uu- wound, which had been made by-the operation of trephining. Sun- dajr when an autopsy was performed the bullet was found imbedded in the upper part of the left hemisphere of the brain, about a quarter of an inch from the scull bone. The condition of the channel from the temple to the bullet, and the sac the bullet was encased, show that the wound was an did one. Saturday. Boston 9, Cincinnati 5: Brooklvn 12. Pitts- burgh 4: New York 2. St Louis 23. Philadel- phia 6. Chicago 4. Baltimore 6, Cleieland 1; Washington 21, Louisville -I June This city ha the honor of entertaining the larges body of ex-confederate heroes that ha ever assembled north of the Mason and Dixie line. They came from al parts of the sunny south, each one a nan of national, reputation, to clasp lands with their northern brothers a the dedication of the monument to the confederate dead buried near Chicago It was Gen. John C. Under wood, of Covinpton, who arrange< the details of the dedication, am through him the Cincinnati Cham ber of Commerce tendered the party an invitation to visit the ''Gateway to the South." The visitors arrived by the Big Four Saturday morning, and the party includes the following dis tinguished gentlemen, together with the ladies accompanying them: Hoi ClnbR. Pittsburgh. Philadelphia. Baltimore. Cincinnati Cleveland Chicago Boston New York Brooklyn Washington... They Stand. Won. Lost. Played. P.C. Loumille 18 16 ;o 10 1C 15 13 I 1.! 5 12 13 II 14 II 15 12 16 17 19 34 30 34 31 30 3--' 34 30 r-ss 576 .511 .571 484 .433 .406 353 167 Two Men Instantly Killed. WOODKIVEH. Neb., June C. Ma thews, of Ravenna. O.. and Charles Baker, of Newberry, Ind., were in- stantly killed here Sunday. They had been in the vicinity some time with their families hunting and fishing. The two men were' hunting early Sun- day morning, and sat down on the Union Pacific track, gome distance rrom town, to rest, waiting- for the -ain which stops at that point on uaL They evidently went to sleep, and the cng-ine passed over them be- fore the train could be stopped. MA.T. GEJf. MATTHEW C. BUTLER. Lieut. Gen. James Longstreet, daugh- ter and Mrs. Sanders and daughter; Maj. (Jen. Mathetv C. Butler, Maj. Gen. Fitzhugh Lee, Maj. Gen. Harry Heth and daughter. Maj. Gen. S. G. French, Maj. Gen. L. L. Lomax, wife and Miss Belle Armstrong, Maj. Gen. H. Kyd Douglas, Urig. Gen. Marcus "j. Wright, wife and Miss Eliza Washing- ton, Brig. Gen. Eppa Hunton, Solicitor General Homos Conrad and wife, Col. Albert Akers and wife, Col. Irvin. CoL Drew and wife. Gen. Fayette Hewitt, Maj. Henry T. Utanton, Maj. L. C. Nor- man, Capt. Littlepage and wife. Maj. Frank V. Robinson, the Misses V. and L. Mitchell and Miss Cox. Maj. Robert W. Hunter and John C. Underwood. .June The condition of the treasury is better than had been expected tne deficit for the eleven months of the present fiscal year, which means That for the month of May is but The defic-it for the eleven montht liad been expected to reach fifty mil- lion or more, and for the month of May to have exceeded five millions. The treasury otlicials moved heaven and earth to keep it down by withhold- ing payments on such claims as could be delayed. The receipts from customs and in- ternal revenue have not increased in the proportion that the treasury had expected and the apparent improve- A CLOUDBURST Does Considerable Damage Property at Curtis, Neb. tc A Waterspout Swept Over Sou them Minnesota, Damaging Crops. At 7ombrota a store, tharcli. Standard OH ttaildinc and I-air Kalldlnc A Heavily l.uadtd Wagon. With IJrlvrr. Overa M ment is really due to the lessening of the expenditures. The indications now are that the deficit for the entire fiscal year will be fifty millions and perhaps more. r.Ai.i.AT'.n WASHINGTON, June state de- partment has been' informed of the death Saturday of William J. H. Hal- lard. United States consul at Hull, England. HIS STUOhE FATAL. WASIIIXG-IOS, June wit- nessed no cessation of the torrid heat which has prevailed continuously since Decoration day. The thermometer registered 96.6 at the signal office. Sev- eral prostrations were reported, among them being John Murray. A stonema- son, who died before medical aid could reach him. SENAiOIi GEOHOK ILL. WASHINGTON, June informa- tion was received in Washington Sun- day that Senator George is critically 511 at his home in Carrollton, Miss., and is not expected to live. Mr. Keorge is one of the ablest democrats in the senate, possessed of considerable learning and a close student. He is hairman of the committee on agri- culture, and is also a member of the judiciary committee. He is a veteran of the Mexican war, was a member of the Mississippi secession convention, and is one of the "Confederate Briga- diers'' in congress. He has been a member of the United States senate ince March 4, 1881. Sr PAUL. Minn.. June great storrn, amounting in olaces to a water spout, swept over Minnesota Saturday night, doinjr much damage to Importan Tt-'lFrtltArH TO THE C., June the case of ;hc United vs Bun and Hod- nick tbc supreme court decided that the present tariff law went into effect instead of August rM Ind June I. CATTLE-Good to choice jihijiphic- medium to cood. common 4 W. Hoes -GooJ to choice medium and heavv, ft 4534 ft. nriscfl. choice Hrhts, 15. SMEtP-Sprinc l2.mS4.OP. cholcfl to extra 3 carlinKS. 13 Sont! sheep. 7J _____.-B. June 1. t red spot and SlfeSI'tc. steamer So. 2 red. era by sample, tl e (Of. ev TRLcniuira TO rne .rcaLicaa CMJC 111. June closings are as follows, wheat 77 corn 51 oats 5 S. Wheat av TcicoKAt-M TO TMK TOLEDO, O., fane i TO TMV WASHINGTON D. Bwil- an government cabled a of aifMih von account of dcatfi. The motion to restore W. H. Todhunitr, trustee of The Middletowa: Paper Co., filed by K. GusKke] was this afterooon duaiimed by of the probate conn, for want of evidence. asked: July. 6 Xo. 2 arukjfc: No S Billed Markt-l ihacthe. NCWYOHK.Junet t red. and elevator. W.BSJC: afloat. 81c: f. o. un- Xo I tionhera. 5. elevator. afloat So S. No. a.J.t: Xo. S western. 36 v ami o Xo t red cash anj Jane, Jolr. AMRHKit, Xo Xo. M'.c, Xo caused Juivaivic fi 87 4, T PlTTSIIVIIKW. I. j wo HIS I known, but Mr. Hendricks. of South Parkersburg, who was watching the skiff as it was slowly making its wav up the river, says that a moment be- fore the explosion the man in charge of the boat appeared to lock his oars, pick up a cloth, dip in the river, shake it out and spread it back on the deck. As he did so Mr. Hendricks noticed a small flash, immediately after which the house was torn from its founda- tion by a mighty shock and that he himself was thrown many feet and stunned into almost unconsciousness. It is thought that the vans became overheated from the intense heat of the sun. and that when the man sud- denly cooled one of them the shock war. so sudden that the stuff gave wav. ________________ Shot by Her Stepbrother. CHICAGO. .lune von Glann. who was wounded Saturday night by VVm. Kick, her stepbrother, died Sun- day afternoon at her home, where the shooting was done. Kick was in love with his stepsister, and quarrelled with hci about, receiving the attention of otucr young men. Words passed between the two Stturday night, and the girl Jold him she would never mar- ry him The man drew a revolver and the gi: Iran. He-shot and she fell. He claims that he drew the revolver to frightcii his sister, and that it was dis- charged in-accident. A Hot bay In June was weaJiicr mad Sunday. The Detroit M red car Jine peo- ple lake beach resorts, and every one who con Id get out of the city did so. The official thermometer at the wcat'aer office marked 90'i dejr.. but street instruments were as high aa It was the hottest day this cilr has had to endure for Xjt a breath was stirring, and the was simply sickening. No fatalities arc reported. The Snltan Apologises. June The sul- tan has sent secretary to the Enplish, French and Russian am- bassadors here to express his profound regret at the Jeddah outrage (an at- tack by natives upon the consular rep- resentatives of those and to inform the ambassadors that the of- fenders would be court-martialed and punished. Ten liedouins have already been arrested, but it is feared that it will be diflictilt to find the real offend- ers. A Varna Wave at Memphis. MEMPHIS, Tenn., June The weather at Memphis Sunday was the hottest ever experienced since the be- ginning of the weather bureau records for this early in the season. The high- est temperature reached was ninety- eight degrees, and the lowest seventy- five degrees, making a mean tempera- ture for the day of eighty-six degrees. Kitten by a Dog. Ind.. Jes- sie. the five-year-old child of William Xorman. was attacked late Sundav afternoon by a vicious dog belonging to a neighbor and terribiy lacerated. The child will die. Its windpipe was almost severed by the first attack of the brute, Ground to an Klrrtrlr Car. June Kaffer- ty. aged seventeen years, was literally ground to pieces by an electric car at the corner of Tweitli and Race streets. at Sunday nicht- Kafferty had been in this country but six months. liavinsr come here from Ireland. BRIG. GEX. EPPA Committees from the chamber of commerce had charge of the entertain- ment of the guests, and they were met at the Grand Central depot bv Messrs. William McAllister, H. Lee Early, Capt. R. M. Wise, R. W. Campbell, Brent Arnold, M. J. Freiberg. Col. C. B. Hunt, J. M. Glenn. 11. H. Meyer, H. P. Piper. J. J. Hooker. S. M. Felton, Archer Brown. Ralph Peters and R O. McCormick. The visitors were escort- ed to the Grand hotel, which will be their headquarters while iu the city. After breakfast they were met at the hotel by another committee, including Gen. Michael Kyan. President Glenn, of the chamber of commerce, Supt. C. B. Murray. Archer Brown. A. G. Corre and E. P. Wilson. At they took carriages and visited the city hall, where thev were welcomed by Mavor Caldwcll. Yorkers. M.MAI lair. The First warJ-NarrV1 were vester4av int defeated MUsrfnwaM park, by the HMUfcWwi 74 to 4. the "Wwryy the Orerpcck teMi by icarc of 6 to 5. .1 n J lair a< 70. xx-araiti'. 14 win-Coot cammoa lo Tilr. miv-d RUCK. Ark.. -June G. evidently a man of means. and refinement, found   one of the hottest days ever known in the Savannah district. At Millcn the temperature reached 101 degrees by the official weather bureau report. and private advices from other points show SMF: visited Sfttnriar nigK he 5o K3i3s habal. tm Inwa. la.. Jane A heavy Cilr and vicisjitv wind revelling M hour, tat there were twcr- Heat tm M. ST. .lane 3 p. m. Sunday the heat record SO degrees, but light breeze relieved the effect Three men were overcome by heat, and a number of horves were prostrated in different of The city. at I'lttahanih. I'IITMH -lune The hot spell stiH continues in this vjcanitv, >un- riay the thermometer registered de- grees. far as knon-n no serious prostrations from occurred Sun- day. _ Nay a Fallarr In HIlMM. M-WW.J ju K 133 June -The Mon- itor Monday sajs that the wheat, oats and hay crops m central Illinois will be failures, and that 1he harvest will scarcely pay 'he of planting. Wrj f 1 JUKI s. .hane .'..-The Four- teenth regiment Jinnday adopted congratulating the operators and the recent settlement of their trouble. W. Vm., Jaa-e refiatered w; LOX4STKKCT- After ao inspection of the city hall the committee conducted them to the Art museum, where they spent the forenoon. The visitors .speak 5n the highest terrasof their reception at Chicago, and all of them have words of the highest for Gen. Underwood, who they say has been untiring in his for their comfort and enjoyment. They have all suffered more or less from the heat, but were assured by Ueneral Un- derwood that the weather ordered for their benefit, but came a little too strong. The visiting ex-confederate heroes and Jheir lady friends were >undav noon given an to see some of the beauties of the suburbs of the Vueen City of the West. After feast- ing at the Grand on Saturday night, they were civen a chance to'restnp from their round of hand-shaking and entertainment of the before. Thev enjoyed the rest after the trip froi Chicago. 1IH EI.WOOD. Ind.. June trial of Harry Painter, the Alexandria officer charged with the vrarder cf a glass worker Snyder, who resisted j arrest, has coatianed Belt Friday. i A DESPERATE CRIMINAL. Convict Sullivan. Recently Par- doned by GOT. Altfeld, Identified. RiJfCETox, 111., June Sulli- van, one of the men arrested for com- ilicity in the Orion State bank rob- bery has been identified as a desperate riminal, who was recently pardoned >y Gov. Altgl'ld. He was sent to the penitentiary ten years ago, to serve a twenty-five years' sentence for robbing an old couple at Wheaton 111. Sullivan bound the old people and burned and otherwise tortured them. Last fall Gov. Altgeld conclud- ed that Sullivan had been in the pen long enough, and accordingly released him in order to make them reveal the hiding place of their money. Since that time he has been or- ganizing a gang for general robbery, but the job at Orion may send him back to the penitentiary. May Never Again. XEW YOKK, June Hildreth, who trains the eastern division of "Lucky" Baldwin's stable, says that Rey el Santa Anta will never race again. The horse pulled up quite lame after the race on Thursday, but little or no attention was paid to the lame- ness, as it was believed he would walk out of it. He is now worse, and his trainer doubts if he ever get him to the post again. Giant Skeleton Loearthed, VALPARAISO. Ind., June the steam shovels of the Knickerbocker Sand Co. were loading sand at Dune park, on the shore of Lake Michigan, they unearthed a well-preserved skele- ton seven feet two inches in length, and is supposed to be that of a tnem- of an early tribe of Indians. It was found nearly thirty feet under ground. Silver Convention at NEW June call has been issued for a silver convention to meet in Xcw Orleans Monday. June 10. crops, and wrecking a good manv building-s. The center of fne storm area seems to have been Zjuabrota. where a store, a chnrcn and the Standard Oil building prac- ticallv wrecked. All the at the fair grounds ax that point vtere demolished. At po.nts in the neighborhood there was a srreat fall of hail, killing bird, and cutting down young grain and trarrlea truck. At Faribanlt the water f_-ll so fast that sidewalks were floated awav. Henry Herman off a sidewalk and nearly drowned before recovered. At Zumbrota a wagon heavily loaded, and a team of horses, together with the driver, were blown over a wire fence and deposited in a creek twenty feet away. Cfuns. Neb.. June A storm which visited this place, Saturday, seems to have been a cloudburst north and west of here. The W ild cacon taps the Medi- cine river at Curtis and drains countrv thirty miles north of thia town. It is in the mouth of this canon that Curtis lake is formed, the water supply being furnished from Medicine river. The flood struck the rail- road yards, cutting its way through to the river valley be- low, and made a branch over the railroad yards one hun- dred feet across and twenty-five feet deep. Five lines of track are suspend- ed over the breach. Box cars stand- ing on the track went down and mre floating in the valley, and many more are dumped into the water and broken up. The mill is being undermined and can not stand over night. The rail- road tracks are under water east of here. Many farmers report leas of stock by drowning in the flood. The damage to the railroad will reach 830.- 000. and the mill property had at noon suffered to the extent of The whole population was out Sunday aft- ernoon, but is powerless to save the mill. McCoox. Xeb.. June Word waa received here at Sunday morning that the train sent from here to "Crib- washout, east of McCook. had gone into a washout, between Edison and Oxford. A wrecking train and crew left for the scene of the accident. It is reported that three men were killed the engineer, fireman and brakeman. McCooK. Neb., June Further de- tails confirm the story that three men were killed, but names are obtain- able. One of the cretv was also proba- bly injured. OMAHA, June Reports from all parts of the state teil of good rains Saturday night and Sunday, which, in addition to the showers of last week, place the ground in the best condition it has been for several years. WOTIDSVIM.E, N. H.. June The most, terrific gale and hail storm ever seen in this section passed through the town of Bethlehem Sunday evening. The Catholic church was blown flat. Every house in the town suffered the loss of its windows on the north side. Barns and bridges were un- roofed. and trees were torn tip by the roots. and elect delegates to the Memphis Bi- metallists' convention of .lune 3'J and 13 The call is addressed to all those who favor the use of silver and free coinage, regardless of politic-. Nearly all the signers are Democrats. KlvhTlad in Alabama. CHATTAV.OOA. Tenn. June ber has been in inexhausti Lie quantities in the "ridges." near Scottsboro. Ala. This clav forms a rich dye and was used for dyeing pur- poses by farmers' wives in the viciniti before the invention of diamond dves. It is also a valuable paint, used in" oil aad water colors. Confederate Day at H Hf.vTiXGTO.v. W. Va-. June Satur- day was Confederate Day in this city. The G- A. K. post participated in the ceremonies, and salutes were fired over the graves of both the blue and the K-ray. Hon. S. S. Vinson and Kev. J. A. Black, of Catlettsburg. spoke at the cemetery. A large number of promi- nent men of the state delivered ad- dresses. O.. June Wor- cester, who so terribly beat his wife and then cut his own throat, has been adjudged insane and will be taken to the ToJedoasylum. He has attempted suicide several times and has to be Judge Hinman insane when he watched constantly, Worcester was committed the crime- Hia CHATTASOOC.A. Tenn., June Archie, the H-ycar-old son of W. J. McMahon. a wealthy merchant of Ala., was drowned near that place in Crow creek. lad was divinjr when he strangled and to sink. boy comrades ran awvav in fright. The body recovered. rraaT ttnmmmg. u.i.E, Ind, Jane William Timmons, of this did a heroic act. Her voter's child fell into an open ciMern. and Timmons de- liberately jumped in and rescued the cnild. out. ftuMla ST. KG. June here regard the intrigues of Great Brit- ain as the only obstacle in the way of settlement of the eastern question. la view of the possible outcome of the situation Russia will fortify and send troops to the Chinese and Corean. and especially the Indian, frontiers. AmtriraM -June 3. steamship New York, of the American line.which sails from Southampton Sunday, will take passenffcrs'Mr. .1. S. Ewing, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Fittabarffb. I'a.; Mr. and Mrs. Whitelaw Reid aa4; Mrs. Kumsey. with her daughters son, of Chicago. Owl In ROME, .lune son-in-law of Premier CriapiT baa chal- lenged Felice Cavillotti. leader of the extreme radicals, to a duel on account of the Matter's tion against >ifnor Crispi. A Blryrlht ratallv Mart. JViRTi Ind., .Inne Harrison collided with a baggy while, riding a bicycle, and is thought to be fatally injured. The collision urcd several blood Ht- It required four men to get her Fatal Hmaway. Rt Ind., Jane Washing- ton Tarish. a deaf and dnaib man, was instantly kr.led near Arlington, county, being thrown from drawa by a runaway He was farmer and M old. Jt 3s to strive with what wm -an no: avoid: we are born Mibjmta, ind to obey Cod is perfect Jibertr; !M< hat does Um shall be free, safe all succeed to f the fntnn   

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