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Findlay Morning Republican Newspaper Archive: July 23, 1927 - Page 1

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   Findlay Morning Republican (Newspaper) - July 23, 1927, Findlay, Ohio                                 OHIO STATT. í « . ^ C l U v â «fSTr^fCAl III«ARV I S T F í. % H t O w 8 T  coti M- <H|0  m  Ther« b€ lawt made and certufn statutes, liow e>er} one 1b Us estáte »halt be ap* parelleâf but, God knoweth the Statutes are not pat in execution.  —Latimer in 1658  aasassr;  Wm 0*1» yea, nerPm mê / Fhari!«e«», liypMrfe««! fwr fé PHj tithe «f mlmU nid imlnè^ and eaniHtlB, «ni kiir« «irfÊt tw,, Uíé (be we^Mler mâlm the law , .. ,  Mauma  VOL. XLI. NO. 237 Saturday, fair; Sunday, cloudy, warmer  FiNOLAY, OHIO, SATURDAY, JULY 23, 1^7  PRrcETMfiei  CHAIERLIN W OP OFF LINER IN SPEED IES  Flier Accepts Federal Invitation to Try Expediting Ocean Service.  LEVIATHAN CHOSEN SHIP  Aviator Familiar With That Vessel's Deck Room for Plane, Says O'Connor.  [ CURTAIN FOR MELLETT CASE  WASHIXGTOX. July 22.—^^)— Clarence p. Charaberlin, trans-Atlantic aviator, has accepted an Invitation of the shipping board to hop oif the Leviathan in an airplane on her next trip to Europe as a first test of the feasibility of speeding up trans-Atlantic mail and emergency passenger service. Ajrreeinent Reached. The announcement today said aviator reached the agreement with Chairman O'Connor of the board In New York yesterday. His first attempt to hop off from the Leviathan will be made when th(f big vessel is taken from Boston where she is undergoing repairs, back to New York.  "I had a conference in New York -with Charaberlin," Mr. O'Connor said, "with a view of providing transportation of mail and possibly two or three emergency pas-Bpngcrs, in connection with the sailing of the Leviathan for Cherbourg and Southampton on August 1 and subsequent dates. Mr. Cham- i berliu accepted the .suggestion with cnLhu'iasm.  Filer Kiions Vessel. "The Leviathan is now in Bo;-;toii. Mr. Charaberlin has just returned | on the Leviathan and Is thoroughly . familiar with the physical dimen-sicDS and deck accommodations for an airplajio. When the Levia-: than returns from Boston to New; Yorl; Chamberlin expects to fly from her deck in an airplane.'' With the knowledge gained from this hpp CbMrioan O'Connor said, Chamberlin would prepare to transport a plane on the leviathan  1 ind ity ironfi the Sttip  . Í SHAH PAY 10 IX DIKES IN DIXIE  Makes no Decision on Hoover's Advloe That Nation Backs Levee Bonds.  SESSION VIEWS REMAINS  Ohio Pilot to Quide Plane FirsU Called Dies Around World in Attempt To Set Record of 15 Days  CINCLNT^ATL July William Brock, of Springfield, O., a. Detroit dispatch to the Cincinnati Times Star satd today, has been engaged to pilot Edward P. Schlee, of Detroit, on his proposed record breaking flight around the world, to start between August 5 and 11.  Eddie Sfinson, who piloted one of the planes In the national re-  President Does Kot De«ai Bxtra Ctongress for Flood CHirb Alon« Needed.  i^OiWcrTT^'^SB^^ " SA.l With the convictkw and aendiiig of Fonner Police Chief  RAPID CITY, July The federal treasury will-be opened by President Coolidfo for f^nd« to repair broken dikes oi the MIs-slsjslppi river but he reached lil^ decision on another recommendation of Sfcretary Hoover to have the government help meet Interest and amortiiatlon charges on levee bonds in the devastated area.  Likewise, it was reiterated at the executive <rface that the president has reached no conclusion on the question of convening congreas In special session a month or six weeks ahead ot the regular meeting in December to consider flood relief and control measures.  TIews Uncbanfed  It was stated that Mr. CooHdge has not changed his views on this proposal which are understood to be that he does not consider the special session necessary for flood control alone but is willing to listen to the desires of congress for getting an early start on a prospective heavy calendar.  Senator Root, Republican, Utah, cbalrma.n of the senate finance committee, who is a guest at the summer White House reiterated today his ^belief that a special session would be called. He also  Seranus A. Lengel of Cantos, O,, to prison for life, Uie enrUia falla on the case of Don R. Mellett, cnuading editor, arardeied in July, }926. In the Ohio state penitentiary,-gray-haired Leagel j<rfiia Pat McDermott, Louis Mazer, Ben Rndaer and Floyd Streitenbeifer, all J enounced that he would fight to sentenced to life impriaomneirt except Ma»er, who gained leili«aey by turning state's evidence. The victim and the eonvleted are ahaim above.  labor EM  Is imth«' EJuropeaa coast.  Mfgrht Carry Two Patisengerif.  If weather conditions are pro-pi liotts Chairman O'Connor ~Tjai4, i:ii:imbcr]lii will leave the Lcvia-j th'.r.i in lii.s plane some hundreds of v.iilc.-; from Kuropc with ano or nvo! passengers it they can show urg-l cut reason for haste. ~ ;  "Of couVse the details cannot bej thoroughly woiived out until a more carctul study has been com-pictcil," he said. "We shall have the b-nefit of Mr. Chainberlin's advice L'ud his associates, whose experience best qualifies them to be ol' service."  The Leviathan lias a heighth of G1 1-2 feet from her top deck to the water edge and aviation experts point but that this will be a dccided advantage in favor of a successful test of the idea.  Mall Ships Roomy.  •Mi o! the government's mail carrying ships; arc believed to have room for at least one plane while some ot the larger passenger liners, like the George Washington and her sister ships, can accommodate more.  CcmmiEsioncr Teller of the board has been requested by Chairman O'Connor to look into the feasibility of launching such a service from the Pacific coast and while officials of the board thought^ but f^W passengers would see such an emergency service on the seas, it would be of tremendous value for speding up international mail transportation. ^  Girl Drowns At Marion  MARION, O., July 22. — (/P) — Elsie George. 14, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John George, was drowned today In the tattle Scioto river near here. She had gone bathing watli a group otf friends. She stepped oft a ledge^ and was unalbie to sw^.  Aimee Prefers to Travel to Having Battles With "Ma'^  mhers of About 400 Condemn Peace Justice System and l\^arshall Law  MIDdIeTOAVN, July 22~(JP)— One lone delegate out of approximately 400 championed the cause of the Anti-Saloon League in the Ohio Federation of Labor convention here today in the discussion on the resolution to support the staté-wide referendum campaign on the Marshall bill re-establishing justice of the peace courts.  The present justice system and the Marshall ^iw passed by the last legislature were roundly condemned.  When the vote was taken the presiding officer announced the resolution had carried unanimously but the one delegate, F. M. Anderson. Sebring. who had spoken against tbe resolution aroje to announce that he voted-"No." The convention closed today to meet next October In Columbus after re-electtng by acclamation John P. Prey, Cincinnati, as president, Thomas J. Donnelly, Columbus, secretary-treasurer and the entire executive board.  The convention adopted a reso-1 lution pledging organized labor j to "come to the aid ot the jstrik-1 Ing miners of Ohio and assist in ' financing the struggle."  Judge Held as Speeder to Show in Own Court  umtx^  . Quftty  OHICAQO. Jaly Zijr-iJP)— Judge A. W. Summers of Eldorado, III., slttliig as a Vacation judge in Chicago traffic court, who innc^nced last_ week that he Intended to irlie peaistTiaws who walked across the streets, against the traffic lights an«fc enforce other traffic regulations today faced a charge of speeding.  Judge Summers was returning from a golf llnkp with Judge C. H. Douglaa of Mattoon, 111., as a guest, when a stern-f^ced policeman stopped them.  "Wher'e's the fire?" demanded the officer.  "But, ofliicer—countered the judge.  "No 'buts' " said the policeman. "tell it to Judge Summers."  "But I am Judge Summers," countered his honor.* "And here's another judge to prove it."  "Well that's a good one," complimented the cop, admiringly. "Here's your ticket"  The case, comes up August 2, when the olBcer expects to tell the judge «bout the man who posed as his honor. Judge Summer^ said he thought he would plead guilty.  NDBÜRGH » KILLS BOSION IN  FOSTER PARENTS CLAIM SON PUT DRUG IN MILK  have the prospective tax reduction made o apply ol ncomes of this calendar year, on which taxes would be paid starting next March 15.  Withholds Flnancinf Plan Pending a more detailed report from the army engineers on the Misslaaippl flood iltuatton, Mr. Coolidge ii wlthhpUU;^, .P^ta  Si«ii?i<tion8 whetUet Hi« fe«« government can tne interest and amortixalon charges on local bonds, but is holding an open mind on this suggestion^  He Is similarly awaiting furtheil details before taking a position on the secretary'^B ^^commendation that the government take over the work of closing and repairing all levee systems in the flooded area.  State Auditor's Duty to' Take Library Invehtory, Attorney Generar Decides  COLUMBUS, July 22. — (;P) — Without delivering any opinion as to whether C. B. GaJbreath legally can hi>ld position« both aa secretary of the Ohio Archaeolo^OBl and Historical society and as state llbrari&n. Attorney General Ed. warl C. Tamer today ruleil that it is the present duty of the state auditor to Inventory the state library.  "Whether Mr. OaltoreaUi 1« qualified to succeed Mr. Hershlwg Is Tiot pertinent in the matter of jxvur duty to m«ke tbe InveciiiDry", the ' opinion saJd. "The inventory nor-! mally would be required even without the library board'« present request for it, In vlejp of Hershberg's dismissal and cf tlie resignation of Vernon M. Riegel. director of education and chairman oi the board."  Excitement Fatal; Nearly 40 Hurt; Flier Has to Flee Howling Mob.  BOSTON, Jirt« 22—Over eagerness to catch a glimpse ot Colonel Charles Lindbergh today caused the death of one person and Injury of nearly forty others. An unidentified man of about 3S years collapsed in tbe crowd that pressed about the airport where, the flier landed, and although rui^hed to tbe local relief hospital, was pronounced dead from over excitement. ^  Boston gave an uproarious welcome to Lindbergh, consueror of the Atlantic.  From the moment the wheels ot the Spirit of St. Louis touched the cinders of the east Boston airport to the moment three hours later when the doors of his hotel room closed behind him, Lindbergh was the center of a howling mob of devotees who made any sacrifice of personal safety for one glimpse of their hero, and then strove for another.  Warned by the experiences In France and New York, tbe flier escapied unscathed. A number of persons were overcome in the crush.  liability air tours, was announced earlier as the pilot.  A preliminary flight is eched-uled to be made from Detroit to New York next Monday to have the navigating Instruments installed, the paper said.  Brock, 31, learned to fly at the Thomas Brother School of Aviation at Bath, N. Y.. In 1912. He was a civilian instructor in the army at the outbreak of the war and was commissioned and resigned as a lieutenant.  Plans for the flight were perfected today, the Times-Star dis-patc hs^d, and the goal will be to break the present round the world record ot 28 days, 14 hours and 36 minutes held by Llnton Wells and Edward S. Evans, Detroit manufacturer. Schlee hopes to cover the distance in 15 days.  The route planned follods: Sel-fridge Field to Harbor Grace, NP., across the Atlantic to London, to Berlin, Moscow, Krasno, Uflnsk, Kurgan, Omsk. Irkutsk, Chita, Harbin. Vladlv^ock, Tokyo, Midway Islands, Hawaii, San Francisco and Detroit.^  ROGUES' GALLERY FAILS AS CLUE TO 3 ROBBERS  But Hasn't T^ Mm That Wouid Mak« Nin« Dangerous PrelmlKi  - - .-L- JJOt  EXILE MADE Km  COLUMBUS, July 22.—W—In-cicimprete perusal ot picture« in tJie rogues gallery of *hs birr»au ol itlentlflcation at Ohio penitentiary today failed to reveal to Alphonso Berry, treasurer- et Shelby county, a likeness of any oi the three bandit« who abducted him lauft Wednesday and robbed him of $40,000 In couaitv funds, Including about $12,000 in cash.  B«Try and Sheriff S. E. Dllbane, of Shelby county, arrived at Ohio penitentiary thds afternoon but as they had seen only a part of the >piicturefl at do&iug time at the bureau, they announced they would fltay over until tomorrow.  Veto of 2.75 Beer Bill Followed by Senate Making Enforcement Target.-»  VAN WESRT,; July 22.-(A*)— Thomas Wade, 21, is In the county jail under, |1,600 bond, charged with having attempted to uolson his foster pareota, Mr, and Mrs. Dorce Morehead.  Morehead charges Wade placed rat poison in the milk he and his Mte. „were._tQL. drlnt Jast_ Jjine 4.9» Wade was arrested at Dull.o., near here, where he was working, Thursday. Wade is said to Jhavf run away from home when the alleged plot was discovered.  LOS AN0BLB3S, July 22—{/f>)— Almee Semple McPherson, speed-§ Ing back to Angelus Temple here to assume command of the church organliatlon she built with her evangelistic preaching, left Los Atigelejs, some weeks ago because of dtesension with her mother, Mrs. Minnie Kennedy, business manager of the temple. It was revealed today.  A letter from the evangeltet to the Rer. Charles A. Haynes, her personal representative here, made public today was the flrst direct revelation coming from Mrs. Mc-PhersOn to explain har departure from hoB AngeSea two months ago {or revival services In lUinois.  She dec!ar#d is the letter —»fc® ■would rather spend her entire time in the field than fight with ¿er mother.  - ' Reports of quarrels between Mrs. McPherson and her mother have been fr«^uent since the evangelijst's mysteriooa liiBap-pearance and alleced kidnaping last year and the snbseauent prosecution of the two charges or attempting to fvame-up a story to fxplain Mrs. MgPhereon's dflsap^ ^tf^rance. . .  MADISON, Wis., July 22.—(JP)— Within a few hours of the reading of Governor Zimmerman's veto ot the Duncan beer bill. Intended to repeal a »ection of the stir's prohibition enforcement lawQind allow 2i75 per cent beer, the state senate today engrossed a substitute bill which would repeal the entire state enfwcement law, as has l^n done in New York.  The amendment taices the i^iace of a bill which would hate abolished tbe ofRce of Drohfbtfon eom-mlsfloner, placing liquor law' enforcement under the supervislo« o^ the attorney general. The Dnnean beer bill^ vetoed this morning, <wly rspesl5d that thii^^M^  which provided a penalty for eon-Vienna of the law violators. This, Governor Zimmermaii held, was "Invalid and. misleading, > attempting by indireetk>ii to nnllify a law of the United States." ^ The present amendment, which bi voted on next weeJs» removes all laws which call lor atate enforcement of the federal prohibition law. If It becomes a law Sn Wiscon^n there *ill be: no state ento-cemeat oi the laws.  Shooting- at Bellefdntdine Was Acciçferitat In gle, Defend Pleiai^;  BBLLB?X)irÎÀIîàE. O., July 22. —(/P)—Joseph Mttdd, Dayton rooming house keeper, to&ti^t' was found not guiity oC second 4eg]fee murder in ooniiecttoh with death of Asa FérHt|, steamfltter of Dayton and Toleio. A ntgH lé»-'  trial. The jury was out 45 minâtes. ' .  Mudd'a attorneys, were Utieceg«-ful in their contention that the shooting was accidentia, reaitltlng from a struggle over cun at' a filling station here May Î9. .  Mtfdd juid his wife, who were driving from Dayton to Toledo to ipend^'Decoration Day, testified Ferris threatened tf> shoot them witen he thought they were taking him-beyond Toledo. .à..  PACIFIC FLIERS IN BEAN^AMEO GIÏÏ  4,000 Bostonese JlVélconte Pair With Cheer as They Make Perfect Stop.  Si Mil« Xareh for  CLBVBLAND, July 2l  bMtoiMiwsr arrangey fof thi parade that Will feattire the appearance here Aug uetlvisfGoloael Lindbergh.  From the airport where the aviator will land the parade will set out, traversing the west side, cutting through the malket district, and winding out to Wade park on the east side where Uadbergh will make a speech.  After six more miles of parading down Euclid avenue to public square he will go to a hotel for a banquet in his honor.  MliOiiS FAIL  DC  FyLLER SEES DOOMED MEN  Harry Chapman Gilbert, WasH-ington' D. C., first man drafted for scrvice in the World War, is dead in Denver, Colo., whence he bad gone for his health. His draft number, 258, was the first drawn by Secretary of War Newton D.  Baker on June 21, 1917. Gilbert's —»t. ^t*«  i .. . . wL-x TT prerogatives that go WKh tlta father is a former White House u,  _ V u J J ) BemaOis n Swiwiifa*  policeman, who served under j The former crow» prtnea «»^  eight presidents, but retired two | malnlng in Melttllon. aoi years ago and went west with his Uhe death two das« «Co «f ion ¡father, King f^Afrdlnand ot  " whether hie  crea Afaiast ^ÌÉ^^^  Koniutiiiiiéfttfwrtlte  PARIS. July (ffV-ti^' Who might have who still would Da spending restleta dart drawn shutteri of hts riUt ionable Neuilly. . '  Through a statement iamtnA his behalf last night he tn^ let the world know that iM himself "King Carol of But since then he haa nothing and nothing lu voucheafed for. him t» and how he expects to exerctM'  . C. DONNELL EXPIRES SUDDENLY  Widow of Late President of Ohio Oil Company Oies of Heart Attack.  Problem of Operators to Find Market for Coal, Asserts Bobbins.  CLBViXAND, July 22.—(/P)— The' executive committee of the Ohio Coal Operators' association met here tojlay and adjourned after a 5-minutc aesBlon without taking any action on the opening of the mines.  The entire meeting was devoted to informal discussion ot the situation resulting from refusal of the miners' union to accept a competitive wage of $5.  At the conclusion ot the session S. S. Robbins, president of the association, told newspapermen that in view of the demoralized condition of the coal market the matter of opeîding mines was largely an ludivlduàl problem ot each operator finding a place to dispose Of coal after It Is produced.______  Mr. Robbins said an over-supply exists now and that many large consumers, uncertain of the out-com« of the long conflict in Ohio,  wnsTnx' Iiiiv '>')_i4>^Lieuten- i contracted far ahead for their  Knl «.?7 meeting that plans-wottld go ahead  Boston airport at 8:87 o clock to- ^^^ «f »k* nh4* ».i»^.  night, two hours and seven min  utes after their hop off from Mitchell field, N. Y.  A crowd o£ more than 4,000 bad assembled at the airport and when the big^ Fk>kker transiport plane an«! its eicort of three army pnr-snit planes hove in tight a great cheer went up." Aa soon as the machiiie came to a stop after a perfect landing. Lieutenant Hegen-bem^r Jsnijped ont to embrace Ms wii« and two .children, i A cmamit-tee of Amerlean Lt;gm ofllcials and army offlcers waited for the fiunily greetings to end before clMlnf in to eieim th^ guests.  A few ittiftntes after «le lahdliig the ffiers and tiielr party, which l^eladed ^>rter Adams, fresident  "tSy-yatiossî Asrcí  soolation started by ai^t^nobila to tbe Hotel BeÜIevne, Boston, whfre tie fliers were entwtátned at dinner..  Party Oft To Boston.  for the opening the Ohio mines, but it w^as mada piain that any wholeeade and speedy resnmptlon of work was net to be expect«^.  The Powhattan AÍlning company joined the ranks of a number of company's preparing to recpen its property on aoo'-mUm bufia tor day and paved the way for employment of non-nnion labor by filing 25 eviction suite at St. Cifirsville against tiBi<m miners in cbmpanir houses.  PRINCE MEET 0  BALDWIN WILL AWËS ON BRIDaE  iiONDON, July SSr-m—The Prince of Wales and Premier  jBMidwlB ' dnriag theüLJfl>gtÍM^e^  Váníettí, Bold at Star!, ^ííemrOepre^sed^t of Hour Interview.  BOSTON, July 22—(/P)—The man who alone holds the lives of the two men In hia hand today Interviewed in the state prison In Charleston I Icola S a c e o ^ and Bartolomeo Vaniettl, awaiting execution tor murder. Governor A. T. Fuller went to' the prison and talked to the two condemned men and also to Celestino Madelros, also sentenced to die In the electric chair, who some months ago made a "confession" which would have exonerated Sacco and Vanzettl.  The governor refused to make any statement. He left the prison hurriedly, plainly striving to avoid meeting newspapermen who had followed him. Returned to the state house, he reiterated that he had nothing to make public.  Only one clue to the matter ot the conferences was gleamed by watchers, and that was by Inference. Vanzettl, who faced Judge Weibster Thayer boldly when he and Sacco were condemned to death In Bedbam court, today entered the warden's office at the prison to meet the governor with the same confidence and with a sheaf of notes in his hand. There was no sign of weakness from the six. day fast endured by him ana Sacco In protest against th« methods of the governor's Inquiry Into their cajse. But ¡t was a different Vanzettl who walked from the office an hour later.  Watchers at the prison said that Vatizetti shuffled out with shoulders flowed and head cast down, the very picture ot depression. On this fact the rumo spread that the Interview had been unsatisfactory  HAD BEEN ILL 2 HOURS  Lived Entire Life ia  Fiaifiay-^Wiwi Bom  nla. But  mixjed with regret over wl have been If he had nat claim to t'ue Rumanian in 1»25. or with hope that ht Oflif day may actually ascend the tih»^ left vacant by hU father «n<l^ noir held by his own 6-year-old'ao^^ Michael, Carol refuses to uai ■.  Few callers enter Carol's villi, .Mme. Magda Lupescu. the tltaii* haired beauty of Jaasey, for whom he gave up wife, child and kingdom, is a freqtient visitor» hut aha Is not living at the Neuflly villa. Gets Wire Xesstfes* Most of the visitors are messen* gers bringing telegrams and newsboys delivering the latest edltloas  of the-papersi-------------------rr^  Afternoon, papers delivered the villa today pttWished. prominently the letter nrrltteii tr r' Ferdinand to twp ^tm few»,-"  A two hours' Illness proved fatal yesterday- morning to -Mrs. J. C, Donnell, widow of the late chief executive of the Ohio Oil company, who died last January.  Mrs. Donnell died at 3:45 o'clock of neuralgia of the heart She was taken III shortly before 2 o'clock. A phylslclan who was called to the home administered treatment, but It was of no avail, for she gradually became worse until she passed away.  Comes ai Shock  Although having suffered a number of heart atacka in recent years, | funeral  Mrs. Donnell had been in fairly j good health, in recent weeks. The spddenness of her death, hence, came a« a genuine .<)hock to members of the family and her many friends.  Funeral services will be held at ~4 o'clock Sunday afternoon at the home, 1003 South Main street  not«d in statemeitt that the throne "ot big «wâ. an dwithout constraint."  Someiiumanian« in Parbi gay lé was against his own will th^it Ktd^ Ferdinand signed a deçrte fk Ja*^ uary, 192«, exiling Carol. li-ia ^ dared that the king wept Mttetif as he amxed his name to the 'doett<*' ment.  (lires Up G<rfng tê Rites.  "My friends teil me ft is for tha greater glory ot Rumania," he ia said to hay« told callera.  Carol apparently has giv^ all Idea of attending his  in Bucharest Sunday.  Whatever the thongltt» .*rf-j former crown prince. It learned from sources elotf, to that be has in no wigr «i ' the hope of sitting npos the of Rumania, and there to in the minds of those eloa^ that he is earnestly reaolved succeed his father. This resolution thai far«  Rev. John David Lindsay, pastor  of the First Presbyterian church, lever, has been traulatiMC will officiate. Interment will be | acts of initiative that tTotiW in Maple Grove cemetery. jhfm a dangerous pretender. SO  Mrs. Donnell had been a Findlayj asknown. ^ .  resident, virtually her #ntlre life.j Ambt^« Fuwat^  She came to this city as a young! A general pariq^ ttt girl from Piqua where she was j power and amlHUw If jtba resided here  born, and had resided here con tinually since that time.  X/Bst of Family  She was a da^t-^hter of Rev. and Mrs. J. A. Meeks having been one of seven children, including four daughters and three sons. All are (Continued on Page Five)  Two Indicted For Murder .  AKRON, July 22.—<^P)~Two men were Indicted here today on charges of flrst degree mnrder. Willie Allen, 55, was Indicted for the slaying of Sam Grant, shot last April In an argument over a pam-  bling game. Maria Dfstefaoe 3«, condemned men but It was; jn^jjcted for the fatal stabbing no more than inference. ~ f ^¡^chfem  The governor visited .Madelros,  to whom he has granted several) * '---  respites, the latest to August 10. | Madelros, convicted of the murderj of a bank cashier, asserted while j In Jail that t gang which he was associated committed the South Bralntree murders of which Sacco and Vanzettl were convicted.  see today hy The R^blican thai-  3 DEATHS UÜD ID  The findlay open Mitmd^.  Chautauqua will  A vesper service is planned Sunday afternoon at the C^utauqua tent.  Removal of Derail at Toledo Called Fault of Both Roa#4 involved.  COLUMBUS, O., July 22.— Removal of a derail withont ccm-ifnt of the pttblic ntllitlea coaunls-0ion and failure of "snbttitate'"  ing visit to Canada will ntolar fìrom Niagara Falls to meet Mee Presldeiit Itewes and Secretary of State Kellogg on the newly erected Buffalo petce bridge on Aitg-ust 7, It was officially announced NÉW YORK. July 22—^(jph-1 today. Commander Rilhard E. Byrd and" The Prince, all ready to startìwhich thfee people were killed, ex-hia "fhipmates." Lieutenant Geo, | tomorrow on his visit to Canada. i presses the opinion that both the O. NOvilie, Bert Acoata and Brent | attended today's garden party at Toledo, Angola and Western rall-Balehen. together with Clarence | Buckingham Palace, making his ■ way and Toledo and Indiana In D. Chamberlin ieft by train to-j last formal appearance before! urban railway are to blame tor the? Police believe tby?^ have found night for Boston. ... leaving for Southampton. i wreck. ^ Ì an abandoned bandit automobile.  iafe^ aittunres are given as ¿«nse tor tnrintemrbrfn and freight train wreck at the Dorr street crMting, Toledo, July 12, in a preliminary report of commission investigators-The report on the accident, i»  Mrs. J. C. Donnell died xeeter-day. __^ .  Thirty-two boy scouts are at the reservation, for the seomid eamp period.  FiVe local Officers left for training camp yesterday.  Assets of the Palace of Sweets are MKnit half the liabilities.  j% n uu*«ü WSSr uua.«u  WMmtjmr-  ville yMterday to serve ont a liquor fine.. . .  Three divorces*were granted to women here yesierday.  President Allen I« improving at the Altoona, Pa., hospitei  .l*new trial in the Molholiand case has been asked.  in which former trlai^t porters describa hi* his father's death. One Rumanian, who «Ik mdetlHi was prepared to aubscrUt» a , sum to CaroT^ eanfa, abandoned hISL.  The inflnenoa of Mi so far as Carol's aoeoe throne is ooncerned, ia. uatoTtunate by his frieniv wishers, ahhoofb lier port appears to _  Prot«mor Jbrga; ' man of Romania,'* and lecturer at th^ «AHf enees at the Sorbonne, «« time ago that Carol expect to return to Kwm]^ 1^8 he ffiTee up J^^ " ^ t^tnma to hi« wife ^«fift 1 un<tor tha sama roof with his tíiild-"  Qaeen WtìÈ» .Wtmm^ Meanwhile Qneaa Mueub^ though now only n. is benered in Itt Paris to wield more mania at present tM.V«^^ her husband's ir«ig|k \ RumaÀians aver iluic pleteiy dominate« her mm» Nicholas, who is one «t^ memhéra of the retea^. triarch Miron Cristea. member of the a devoted fcfimd of? many year» and a of what he feelsL fs ment in alTair« coolness In a 4 * Svprem» C!ò«r^' the othefT  is esocemcd. im J» been gÍT<ín vlietha» ] with trind» «r  iwm ti;«»  Of c^Fia^aiii;  a great  Pastor Hwli uû^ timm  day when ia| he was ridlstg stntcA; br im Ridiovtn«; '  J  VjIS , '.ivi^l   

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