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Findlay Morning Republican: Wednesday, July 20, 1927 - Page 1

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   Findlay Morning Republican (Newspaper) - July 20, 1927, Findlay, Ohio                                 Ohio statc aì ; ha i.-log m: ai 4 HUTOmCAi tlftftAllY  í 5TM A ? i M I GM it  cci . á O íi io  While the Pharlwr« were gathered together, Jesus asked fiiem, saying, What think ye or Christ? whose son is he?  >fatt 22(41,42  Thinking I» the Ênm of tiM }«rti», the immc 4fÊkswH knoti^-mastery of tbe crt «f thinking is heft«« Ohm üH»* * fîtg In fh(> ToracioM, tit« Pnrcs, a«!*, Hassic» 4np toas,  /OL XLI. NO. 234  Wednesday, fair; Thursday, posible showers  FIWDLAY, OHIO, WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 1927  ES St flPEfül OF PARLEY'SSÜCCESS  Bridgeman, Cecil Called to London to Confer With Their Premier,  No More Peanuts  WILL REVIEW SITUATION  British Still Want 8-Inch Ouns Put Only on 10,000 ^ Ton Vessels.  GENEVA, July 1&—(/P)—Out of a mass of early conjectures as to the cause of the return to London of W. C. BridReman and Lord Cecil the chief British delegates to the naval conference,. e m e r g e b the latest understanding that they have merely been Invited by Premier Baldwin to go to London in order to permit final discussion of the conference situation before the prime minister embarks for Canada.  Collapse Denied  Among responaible delegates here there was not the slightest suggestion of the collapse of the conference. It Is pointed out that the conversations In the last few days have been of the most friendly nature and that all the delegates continue hopefvil that the negotiations will be «uccessful in formulating a treaty.  Hugh S. Gibson, chief of the American delegation, said tonight that the return of the British delegates can probably be explained by the desire of Premier Baldwin to review the situation.  British Reaffirm Stand  The British again made it clear today at a private meeting of the chief delegates ol the three powers that it would b impossible for the British to keep within reasonably low total -tonnage flgurea unless the Americans an«^ Japanese agreed to_ keep the maximum size of the second category of cruisers down to the lowest peastbl« displacement and bind themielve« ttot to install 8 inch guns on any cruiser« except those ot 10,000 tons. •••  le, and that is why the  say they do not like  Here's James "Dad" Wib«i, who sold i^anats oa tlut streets of C^isb«, Nebr., for years. Bat never again. Oil has been found on a five-acre farm of bit tn Texa«~and "Dad" has lieen gei-tbg $8|000 a week bi royal^.  wm WILL El ÏANK DEFENSE OF  U  Leader's Assurance U. S. Planes, Bombs, Only Made Noise Led 300 to Die.  HE ONCE HAD 1,000 MEN  Drew Malcontents With Prom ..ise of Loot Eewardfi, Ee-.. ▼eng« on AmtriMBS.  Cold Dinners for Wichita Is Hmtsewivey Move When Company Boosts Qos Rate  WICHITA, Kas., July IS.-f^-Fath«r w^nt'hoos« to a cold dinner tonight as thousands of liou»«wlv«s ob««rv«d the city's nrsr "gaslsss Ti^day" in ]»rot«flt against a »cVMiul« of higher gas rates ordered thl3 month by the Wichita Gas comp&n^.  And f&tbsr learned, as he good-natursdly protected the absence of his cup of hot coffe«. th« iced drinks, salads and other cold dishes would be the family menu  Twins Apart 43 Years Meet; Man 36 Before Knowing He Had Sister  CINCINNATI, 0., July 19— (iP)—Separated for 43 years by adoption, .twin» were re-unlted when Edward Cleaver, of Hamilton, O., and Mrs. Etta Harrlhg-ton, Toledo, met here in the home of Mrs. Harrington's parents by adoption.  Mrs. Harrington was adopted when she was six months old by Mrs. Isaac Bunnell, of Cincinnati. At the same time her brother waa adopted at Harrison, 0., ,by the Cleaver family and was taken to Indiana.  Cleaver did not learn that he had a twin sister until he was 36. Mrs. Harrington knew of her brother but all efforts on the part of either/to locate the other failed until they fonnd each other Monday evening through telegraphic communication. At the time they located each other they were only about .30 miles apart.  SON GÏÏS  MANAGUA, July IS—{JP^— Stunned over his disastrous defeat at Ocotal, General gandlno, leader of Nlcaraguan rebels, has Isolated himself In a remote and lBacce8sl|>le part of the country. The amazing defense hy a handful of United States marines and Nlcaraguan constabulary aided by five bombing planls from Managua, has served to scatter the rebels and has dealt a blow from which they are not soon likely to recover.  Experienced In Field.  Sandino had been able to gather together a large group of.sym-pathiz|er9. He himself had fought under General Moqcada, commander of the liberal forces, and he therefore had much experience in. the field.  He drew to his banner many malcontent« and at one tine had more than 1,000 men under him. He promised his followers all sorts of rewards by looting, and reven^je  imposslb Americans It.  The Americans have asked for the right to build 8,000 ton cruisets so that 8 inch guns could be mounted thereon and have requested that no attempt be made to place a definite limit on the size of secondary cruisers.  Want 8-luch Guns  The British seek low tonnage cruisers with six inch guns.  The Japanese do noi really enter into this cruiser controversy as nene of their cruisers is due for replacement before the expiration of the projected treaty in 1936. They have four 7,300 ton cruisers carrying 8 inch guns, but these could be taken care of by special disposition In the treaty. The Americans are not only Insisting on the liberty to-mount 8 inch guns on secondary cruisers, but ace - cent en dl ng that any agreement to restrict the number of 10,000 ton cruisers to about 12 must be conditional upon this very freedom cf action as to size and armament 0 ftbe smaller cruisers.  Funeral For 4 of Family  LORAIN'. O., July 19.—Funeral services were held here today for four members of the family of Stephen Chura. killed In a grade crossing accident Saturday near Elyrla. Joint services were held for Mr. and Mrs. Chura and their children, Irene, 5, and Vasil, 6 months.  Mile Hike Enough  CLEVELAND, July 19—Dr. I. S. Millstone, 61, returned from California today after walking f!fOO miles of the total round trip distance to Los Angeles. He gave up his walking July 2 at Lajunta, New Mexico after the heat became too oppressive.------------------------  Blast Kills Rail Agent  EAST LIVERPOOL, July 19—(^P) ~W. H. Robinson, 33„ Pennsylvania railroad agent at Smiths Perry, Pa., was probably fatally injured today when sti'uck by rocka hurled by a dynamite blast set off on a road Improvement Job near the station.  Pre-War Stuff h Cause of 2 Being Held to U. S. Jury  COflL^UMBUS, O., July n.^i/P)— William I;, CaosMirls, president and general manager of the Casparis Stone company, and Marcus H. Bumstlne, manager of the Clinton bttilding here, were arraigned today before United States Commissioner Martin, charged with vior lating the national j^rohibitionr act-They pleaded not guilty and were botiM cww to" the teder jury.  Casparls is all«®ed-Jto^ have'i^d' a debt to BuriiaQne by the transfer of liquor from a stock of prewar liquor kiipt- tn the Clinton bulldlEg;. It was /valued by authorities at 110,000.  Assistant U. S. Attorney W. G. Partels said the transfer of ihs liquor in payment of the debt con-gymted a »ale. --------^  GET FLYING CROSS  Awards Made by Wilbur at Banquet; Lindbergh Begins U. S. Tour Today.  NEW YORK, July 19—(^P)— Commander Richard E. Byrd and Lieutenant George, O. Novllle were awarded the distinguished flying cross tonight by Secretary of the Navy Curtis D, Wilbur, in the name of President Coolldge for "courage and extraordinary achievement In flying the plan® America to France."  The awar made at a bai^  qiiet given to the members of the crew of the America and to Clarence D. Chan^berlln.  Col. Lindbergh was at Mitchell Field at 8 a. m. and flew a service plane to New Jersey. At the Teterboro.airport there he climbed into his trana-Atlantfc Spirit of St. Louis, which had been thoroughly overhauled and flew back to Long Island. Tomorrow noon he will hop off for Hartford, Conn., and the first leg.of a national tour In his famous monoplane in the interest of aviation.  Balchen also went to New Jersey today. Por a year he has been test pilot at the Pokker factory at Hasbrouck Heights. He is leaving for Holland August 1 to superintend the transportation from the Pokker factory there to this country of the plane In which Byrd will attempt a flight over the south pole.  Acosta and Noville spent - the day-on-privat^e nffairs-whlle-^Ryrd and Chamberlln went to the Polo grounds in the afternoon where they took part In the golden Jubilee celebration In honor of John McGraw.  Balchen and Lindbergh were, in the air over New Jersey in Pokker planes, the colonel flying a Pokker Universal and Balchen flying a Pokker SJ. "He's a great pilot," Salchen said of the colonel when ho returned.  Mrs. Grasselli Can't Live oli $24,000 Yearly; Must * Have More, Gourt is ToW  CLEVELAND, July 19.—(/Fi)—Notary he&rinfls in connection with the divorce suit oí . Helen-Long Grasséfili against her millionaire hunbamd, Edwa>rd Gra&^li, were halted ttoday ttfter the defense rested Its case.  Further hearing await Mrs. GimseelM,, Who is drained in New York by the illnes« of a Bàtter.  In fiMag the fMit, Mrs. Gr^  c^ahned tòa|L__the_al3<»wíU)ce—of  year made her Grasselli was insufficient to care for her adequately.  Benjamin Bartlett Dt^  CINCINNA-W, July Ifr-^fV-Benjamin D. Bar tiett, 6$. = senior member of Benjamin D. BirUMt and company, died of heart lÜaeMt today , - ---------  on the "Yankees."  When the attack began Saturday morning, many of his sympa-thiwrs In the town Joined him under cover of darkness. The attack was to be a surprise. The rebel leader had belittled the Americans, their airplanes and their bombs, which he told his men "only made a noise"  Soon Halted By I>eadly Fire  he^gan their attack unafraid hnt Captain Hatfleld's' ' m«Q And tlie craa^bulary brought them to a sharp halt by a fierce ai^d ajceurate fii^e,! Blocked In ndiho's fg»-  iii9ll»r the: defiuui« bf the w*i«ht  of'Are froaa sWrmlsh: lines. Every effort to edge forward, bow-ever, had withered un 'er accurate rifle and miachine .gun volles's when. In answer to the report carried to Managua by the two scouting plaqes, the bombing squadron arrived and Sandlno's followers were caught In groups.  Maybe More Than 800 Dead.  Colonel L. M. Gullck, fifth regiment of marines, reports that 100 of the rebels were killed by the marines and constabulary and 200 killed by the bombing planes. Later advlees from Ocotal, however, stat® that the death list may be more than 300.  Three planes returned from Ocotal this afternoon. One of them landed and the officers talked with Captain Hatfleld, In command of the marines there. He said that no attack took place last night.  Sit^tion^cllHln-ifandi  "Les" Maitland, Home After Winging Pacific, Feted; 50;000 at Reception.  MILWAUKEE. July 19.-(/P)—A hom« town's homage to Its illustrious son who gained fame In an epochal flight to the Hawaiian Islands was paid today when Lieutenant Lester J. Maitland revisited the city of bis boyhood for a day.  Receiving a noisy welcome In the city he left in 1917 to embark ui>on an aviatlbn career In the army. Lieutenant Mkltland, or "Les" to the home folks, entered heartily upon an intensive pro-grim.  Into the 24 hours were jammed receptions, dinners, a parade and other functions in which he participated with his companion of hi« western fllirht, Lieutenant Albert Hege-.berger, at his side.  -The day saw the dedication ot the city's airport on the shores ot Lake Michigan, as "M a 1 tl a n d I-ield,'' and participation in a parade that was followed by a civic reception witnessed by about  on each Tuesday for some weeks to come.  Several days ago, after long litigation in the courts, the gas company ordered a new schedule of rates which, according to the company's ofl^cials, will mean that the average consumer will pay about a 23 per cent higher gas bill each month.  Taking matters in their own hands, the city's housewives, at the instigation of the Federation of Women's Clubs, decreed a "gas-leas" Tuesday, and tonight Mrs. John Maltbic, president, declared that "thousands" ot homes were , without gas today. i  "And we are going to have more 'gasless Tuesdays' until we win our fight for lower rates," Mrs. Maltble concluded.  W. R. Phipps. manager of the Wichita Gas company, asserted od the other hand that there bad been no noticeable decrease in the amount of gas used today.  A mass meeting at which public protest will be voiced against Uie new rates Is scheduled for Friday. The rate controversy is still pending in the local district court.  NGOMEO FARMS 5 PER GENI INCRfYEAR  Out for Record  Cotton Drop Biggest Item; Feed Grain, Apple, Potato Loss Has Offset.  $69 OFF EACH FARMER  That is Average IHcrease in Income Available tor Operating Aims.  The situation, Captain Hatfield added, was well In hand, and tj[ie garrison was in good shape.  Two of General Sandino's chiefs are reported to have left him and his forces are widely scatter^i. There is no trace of the rebel general himself.  Protest liftcks Action.  WASHINGTON, July 19_(;5>)— After hours of heated discussion, a resolution of protest to President Coolldge against American marine activities In Nicaragua. Inspired by the battle, of marines and followers of.Getieri^l Sandino at Ocotal, failed of definite action today in the resolutions committee ef the fifth Pan-American labor congress.  • When the committee session broke up members said a compromise resolution would» be drafted and offered to the congress by a sub-committee composed: of Ma-thew—Wolii;—American lieiegatet Luis N. Morones, of Me^ieo; Andre?. H. Morales of Guatemala, and the NIcarajKuan degelates who offered the original do<^ment, Saloipon l&e La Selva and Tran-qulliho Saenz. <  Coninifltee CVmsUleM.  THe Nlearaguans' resolution, which wenid have pretested the "preeenpe «ni activittos" of the marines In their eountry-and "any interference on the part of the United States govehiment in' t'oe affairs of the l>nearagna|t people," was being cohsiderea by the eon^-mittee when the Bav^ dei^i^ment received ite first deitlled repait of the Ocetal battle from -Bear Admiral' Seirer«, Qomraaadlng naval detachments tn< Kiearagna.  Admiral Sellers, commending the XmTerican tTOOia Jn.itfcLeJJfh^ related that, the marine corps had advised him that Geher»! Sandln^^ with about 400 men had atUehed the marines and Klcaregnan national guard, being repuUied with heavy losses. He added that airplane« were cohtinulni fllfW ovff the area to prevent Sandlne's forces from reorgsailsdnf. - —_  Of^n Armour Better  I/JNWW, injy It.— eile «fp^s of the eenditfeo of X  iOiMftir ill h«rf. wave ti^(1led tonight. It wtiB «nnmineed iiitat he «till needed. ooinpSi^ quiirt. aad wae ua-  Planet to Help Welcome.  WASHINGTaV. July 1».—(ÄV-Secretary Kçllogg will participate  umr J. Milft iaiid asid jatNSrt P. rfegeabeyger, the trans - Pacfflc fliers, when they arrive hete on Thursday afternoon. A score of army planes and the dirigible RS-1 will participate in the aerial exercises incident to their arrival by air frojpi Dayton. O.  Citation« for the distinguished flying cross, which has been awarded to both of the fliers, will be read to them by Acting Secretary Davison of the war department at Boiling field immediately after they land. The crosses will be bestowed by the president at some later date.  On their way to Boston by plane on Friday ^MaJlland and Hegenber-ger will be escorted by three pursuit planes of the army ¡air corps.  At the dinner In honor of the two fliers In Washington Thursday night Major General Charles P. Summerall, chleft of staff of the army, will act as toastmaster, and Secretary Xellogg, PT o c t o r t. Dougherty, chairman of the com-mlasloners of the District of Columbia, and Porter H. Adams, president of the National Aeronautical association, will speak.  Ohio Asked to direct.  DAVTON, O.. July 19.—(/P) With Lieutenants Liester J- Malt-land and Albert Hegenberger, Oakland to Hawaii fliers, schedule to arrive in this city at approxlmote-ly 2 p. m- tomorrow afternoon, Mayor Allen MacDonald has asked citizens of this city and other Ohio towns to extend greet Ing? to them and tne air calvacailo which will accompany them to Dayton fleld.  On the arrival of the valiant airmen factory whistles will be sounded and a series of aerial bombs ex()loded.  The program will begin at Mc-Cook field.at 1 o'clock. The epeak-ets^wiLUir OejieralJWimaD^ Gil-mprk Mayor MacDonald and Con? gressman Roy G. FltxgeraM.  Mrs. Maitland and Mrs. Hegen-berjser are both expected to attend.  LINDBERGH AIR GONCiRN TO DIE NATURAL liEATH  COSTS TO FARMER SHOWN PRESIDEN  Production Takes 79 Per Cent More Than Return, Says Corn Belt Group.  RAPID CITY, S. D.. July 19.—ii^P) —Figttrea purporting to show that It eoete tho farmer much more to produce hds crops than he gets for them were presented to President CooHIdge to^Niy in the course of tvo oonvereailcms held by hifli on the agriculture situation,  Tb« ciotm belt cMnmiitee gave Mr. Coolldge a tAble of statistic« showing that it coats the farmer an average of »bout 7» per cent more to produce th^n he receive fof h!s product«. At the end of the :J0 minui«^' conference the committee's rMffsentaUtes declared the fsifHiiiiiii favonMy  toward eheir atiggeèil^n  that a aMÎiôadeP co-operative mfirket-ing system «oust be arteoged.  Sound legl-slatiOQ" also was suggested as an aid for agriculture by Frederick E. Murphy, publis^her c-f tihe Minneapolis r.'bune, who stayed last nig'ht at the summer white house and who drove in to the executive office today with the president.  However, r. Murphy, who baa staunchly opposed the vetoed Mc-Xary-Héugeo farm bill, thinks the Worst period of depression fori^^'' farming pa^t and he reiterated bis disapproval of the measure, which he described as a "delusion and snare". He declared "Farmers air© by no means a \rnlt behind the McNaay-Haugen bill." He predicted great results from increased attention to diversified farmjng.  The sptdkesman of the corn belt ccromlttee. which represents 36 state farm orgahîzatlttn«, princl-pa^lly In the mMdJe wwt, told the president that a remedy would be in a syit^ fof co-opera-tlVe marketing broad enough to include all farm products.  Estimating that Is castfi the larm-era of the west $1.42 a bushel to produce corn, $2.42 for wheat, 79 cents tor oats, |ie,32 a hundred-weght f-jr hogh, and «1 cents a doxen for eggs, the committee based It« concluedon« on the ground that the farm««- should get a return of five per cent on his real estate Investment, seven per cent on bis Inveetment in personal property and eQUipmeat, and that the farm operator shoyfJd gt a »alarj- of 11.800 a yar.  W.\SH1NGT0N. Ju:y 19.—(/P*-Gross agricultural income bauweJ a decrease of about 5 per ceut for tlie crop year which ended June ! 30, as compared with fho i)recedmg i year, the department of agriculture announced today, estimating the gross Income at $12.030,000,01)0. compared with $12,670,000,000. The decline was attributed chiefly to the drop in cotton prices. Smaller incqme came from feed grains, apples and potatoes also, but it was partially offset by somewhat higher-returns irom livestock and livestock products.  >al^Inconie VWth Off.  In computing the gross Income, ca.sh sales- were placed at $9,54(1,-000,000 and the value of food and fuel consumed on farms at $2,531.-000,000. Net income, after deducting expenses, w-as estimated by the J nartment at $3,440,000,000. a decrease of 20 per cent from the preceding year. Expanses of production decreased-only 2 per cent while the gross Income decreased about 5 per cent.  Cash Inccme from sales was estimated as follows: Dairy and poultry products $3.776..,000,000, meat animals 12,892,000,000. fruits and vegetables 51,511,000.000, grains $r.256,000,000 and cotton and cottonseed $1,291,000,000. What Farmers paM.  Expenditures, estimated wages to hired labor $1,238.000,000, operating costs $2,987,000,000, taxes on operator-<^ned Investment $654,-000,000; rent c^h property rented from non-<i)Orator» $1.042,000,000 and Intereit on debts to non-oper-atort |7&0,000,000, making a total  "The .decreased earnings,'* the department reported, "represent a decline In the average income per farm operator available for labor, capital and management from $922 In 1925-192« to fS53 in 1926-1927. Earnings for CapHaL "For the industry as a whole, ihti net earning» available for capital and management as percentage« of all capital employed decreased from o.2 per cent to 4.2 cent, whereas comparable averages earned by all corporations on their total capital Investment appear to have been about ir, per cent in 1925 as computed from reports of the United States treasury dgpailinent and available data Indicate that about the same percentage was earned In 192«."  3 eRITONS TO  Southampton to Ireland, First Leg, Then 1,900 Miles to Newfoundland.  WEATHER SAIO TO FAVOR  Dnralnmin Ship Weighs AI-most 7 Tons, Pnlly ed; Span 72 F««k  Lieutenants ;op, and  SOlTH.WiPTO.V. Jniy l».~m Thp great adventurs will Start .it dnvn tomorro«-." lu thesifé words CaptaiD F. T. Courtney.the Firitish aviatcir. tonight announced that all was in readlnes» for hit rotintl trip Atlantic flight to New York with a crew of two in the rtyiTijç boat Whale.  Captain Courtney planned to make a tlnal test early tomorrow marning. He wUI then refuel and .iliirt not later than 7 a. m. Ir^ Southampton wat&rs 15c»r---Valentii^ Iriiland. At Valentla harb^ thé " citw of ihe Whale will snatch oome lunch, refuel the plane ané lake the air ic-r Newfoundland tti iibout 3 v. ni. ^ >  <.<iod Weather Reported. ^  Captain Courtney tonight re* i.«ived from tne British air mink* p. , ^ . t'O a bulletin Indicating that Tof  Kignot, irench aces, tomorrow the weather at Valent^  4  -4  Dieudonne Coste,  aave been prcpari'g to attempt to would be good. At the same tlmi  a report from New York »aid thai  i break endurance record» set by , _ _______  I American aviators, either in a there and off Newfound-  I flight to the United States or one toward Indin, a longer distance.  and were jecteò.  all that could be ex^  A hitch In the radio during t!^  ----------- ----------------------------------- linal test tomorrow morning '  1* 1 fx* . to be the only thing likely  Coolldge tn« fligM.  ' Pi lot-Engineer Courtney, R. K Little and Downer, who ii bolh navigator and radio ofllcerj hay« been holding numerous oon^ enc-es. One of the laet things tIMt #  ______Courtney did tonight was te teflt  RAPID CJTY q D Juiv collapsible rubber i>oat. built  futllly trl^a to lend assistance , „ , ^  following an automobile accident; i—Hear Stop In U, J,  Aid to Auto Spill; Two Women Killed  MINERS SEEM TO  AVE OPPER HAND  Courtney'! after fffeni'-ee" lodge St. Joma, liii^^^ti _ Mrs the boat would be r«fnet^ flight to New Toik. T|i wc^jld remain 12 hours and it® The dead are Mr«. M. G. Hagen. return,flighl/ of Fargo. N D., and M. e. M.' Ban-1 ' Whale, which Is construd^ nerman, of Mlnneapollfi. h e r duralumin, weighs nearly »ereg. mother. I when contpleteiy loaded.  President CooHdgP pas-^d the ^®^ * «P®® 72 feet. The Whale*» scene shortly after th« car went ^ 10® »U«8  In which two women were killed whe» automotdlo a^unged  oviir i-^iifp ciw wrthirv^iminr  mtfe of the state game where the president and .. ,, Coolldge are «pending the summer.  over the steep hillside and direct ed that members of his party assist rescue work.  E. E. Johnson, a member of the president's party, was overcome by the heat while participating in this westward co^  the rescue work but he improved''^®®*'®*' than air machine.' later under the care of physlcl-anb-.  If Captain Courtney ¿ucce^ spanning the 1,900 mile» «' Atlantic from Ireland to foundland. he will be the i have accomplished the fe«t  DRY LEAGUE TO ANSWER ACCUSATION OF POLITICS  75 TO HAVE ASINNAR»  Two Hocking Valley Collieries Cleaning Up for Opening Suspend,  CLEVELAND,, July 19—(^V-The Lindbergh Air * corpoMtioh, organi«^ here by Vlnceht promoter, vwhen the trana-Ailanttc flye^'^fame wiia first being lier-ald-ed. will die a natural death.,  The promoter said today that he would drop all plans tor jQie selling of itock in the eorj|K»r«tion, which , traa to manu&etur» airplanes and wa« Ihcotporated SOO^ ehai'ea of no par cosnnion stock. Osce.r Llndberg, a atation-ery enj^heer^ere whOM name was used for incdrporatibn of concern, claims he did net authorite iU use.  DMmed Pair Still Fast  JBQSim July: 19—(/P)—Nikola Saecb a^d Bartblbtheo ^ YintetU, -under^eath_flentencel_ for_ Bsyrd completed the third da;y of their aelf-imiposed Cast at the Charl^ town state DHson tentfht without tbuchlng the supper fare of com flfkeg and milk, bread and tea. Sacco now has refused all food;  The farm operatcr, woirid work 365 day« a from this sailary would  however, | daiy.  COLUMBUS. 0 Jufy 19.—(fl^— Only a feW rrtipples ruffled tii« a.p-parent calm surface of the Ohio coal miners' wage controversy to-  year and pay $300  WASHINGTON, July n.~4/P)~A sUtemenJ setting forth the. methods and activity" of the Antl-Saioon league will be issued by its ofnclals .Monday, Bishop Cannon, Jr., chairman of the league's legislative committee, announced tonight upon his return from Detroit where legue officials decided upon that Course.  The announcement, Blshc^ Cannon said, would be In reply to  charge «of political activities of ____, , . — ,  the organlxatlon appearing In some [llT^L^^J^fliK'' newspapers. ^00 aro »till awaitin« nt^m^ s  200 More Await Examin^fi^ as Linked t&OealKdf 87, In|«ry to40a  VIENNA, Jnly inai proceedlBgi were' hÉtitftt«^  this aft^otnr agaiiiDt ft^ti^  The union miners apparently i had the upper hand today in two!  for aîl-products raieed but used byt^^, ^^^ ^^ ^^  Hocking valley being cleaned up jas yet scapendteg operatlonii. At the Ijuhrlg mine of the Lubrig  Tomorrow Mr. Coolldge will confer with Secrctar-y Hoo\er who is expected to step o%-er on his way  I  see today by The Republican that-  to his home In California.  collerjes company about 300 miners assembled for a while this morning  X i W 'Jr-.. the force of 19 cleanuF^en aid not  6. 0. P. MEET, IS BELIEF! work today.  ———_ ' Miner« oftdaJs said they had  'been "peacftfully persuaded" to NEW YORK, July 19—f;P)—Iqudt. Superintendent Charles Fitz-San Francisco will probably be j ér s^id he had told the men not to the scene of the Republican na- come to work ae there was nothing  tional convention next year, W. H^. Crocker, niftional committeeman from California, »aid today.  After a conference with Charles D. Hillea, vice-chairman of the national committee, Crocker .said only the fiat veto of President Coolfdge or Njational Chairman Wyiiem M. Butler would prevent seledïtlçn Of the Ptelfle cosst city. He added thft a majority of the committee members have said that they favored ian Francisco.  Flier's L«ave Extended  Si^'-FRANCIISCO, July J9-(i|») —AccwSlng to Te<i9este made by GoTemor Farringlen o> Hawaii, and others,, A. K. Homphiie«. vice-president of the Faclffe Jltr Transport o^pany» tbdar Attended to Jttly 27,: tbà__dMe for ®rne»t L. Smith Ttor sfil -or the meinland, whence, he flew in the monoplane City of OaklW  Ai^ Educator Dies  CUPVJSUtmr àuly 1».— Profeesor Herman V. Bibert, fl, pember of the faculty et JOtfli^^  Fire cauiied a loss of between $7,000 and $10,000 at the XaUonal Refining company'B plant.  A Foetorlan was convicted and a Carey youth acquitted in a rebbery case y^erday.  A $1,000 fine was g1ve>n a CI cinnatlan yesterday here, upon change-of plea.  The city will s«U the faat three to do. ¡streets on the 1927 Improvement  'rae other mine being cleaned up,!Ai:s**?i 3.  mine 36 at Buchtel, operated byj -  the Manhattan Coal company on Construction otf ttie $115,000  leaee from the New York Coal oompiMy, ad«o was tho scene ei "peacofcfl persuasion". Oral Daugh-erty, i>reskl«i}t of tj>e unk>n snb-d^riet. and five ot his men per-sixadibag the 11 cleanup men tu quit. iHiring t4|e persuasion i^eeches, ArtiiuT Levering, ono at the cl^n-ttp men, was knocked dorwn ..br Dauii^erty. The letter essoined that the fleticuffs were'o>%'er a persona] matter and hot in connection TR-iflh Wfl address. Levertog refneed to talk.  aEVELAND FLIER FALLS 200 FEET; DEATH SEEN  XI^JBVICUUiD. July 19.—i/P)— Nick Didoritch. 3$. civilian aviator, was probably fatally injured tonight when his plane fell 300 feet set the Cievelaad airport.  The idilp wont Into a nose div« after Didovlteh encountered engine  Since supper Saturday night, while, University, died today at Wllkinü--on the moloF W ^hii™^^  aro »till iwaitinf edttiatP  Inatlon.  The charges afilittt thote' will go on trial inelttd« tioQ in an uprlsln^ ret the death of 87 person»«! wounding of 400, amn Istruction of ptthUo and i property valued at mtntòii ! làrs. All face heavy tences.  To avoid . the gOvemmex the funennSi morrow must be pcîvmtel peaco and publie seenrity sared, the government I- wlthdreir the troops from thé a streets. ^ > . ■'  Parliament will conVeiie Monday. It already is e^se^ with hundred» of petttioiw the provincial sòvernmfs#< mandlng the «nael»«»! -^! strike and ahtl-rfet  «outh trunk aewer wifl not start until faM. '  O. D. Donneai lesvee today far [¡the tercentanary observance of oil'» discovery in America.  •île 1928 street ImoHwemeot program here ts already getting consideration.  C. M. T. C. cadets returned yee-►terday.  A 115,000 damage suit waa fWed here yesterday. -----  An e*ea^ yetterittoy denied chaa«» of ooao^lment of aaset».  Goodman «block repaára have been coBn^eted.  U. S. Coombs  Nice  Roinidiiq^i  ' TIïIb is the úa^^  Á Jtmiwr Cbautauqus next week.  pay taxee. lAeBned  President Allen of Findlay Coi-  . , Hí2,rJÍ!|ge_.la suffering from a possible  Vantettl'B only nourishment h«s burg, P«. H# had been »ith the suffered a fractured »kull and ee-1 fracture c« the akuli ia a  •ane."  been an oecMlonal cup oC cogee. iupi^n^y ^^  I rere I  »c^ationB.  -t-  i at Altoona, Pjn.  NICE. Rigid ootlee  crowds aw«iy fM« tì»^  consulate, where jäl ntomiinc» htaab toa^Mretf.  «sptode« Oke imf!k  PO^ «re saocülB^ behittd f»« 1MR9 i  TlîSr '  A  the m^M <189« i» «ÉM  Nto mm  Col. T. Wotám ine. retired. J^ tal «tini  ÊÊm  W   

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