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East Liverpool Saturday Review: Saturday, November 20, 1886 - Page 1

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   East Liverpool Saturday Review (Newspaper) - November 20, 1886, East Liverpool, Ohio                                 ti*?  VOL. 8. NO. 0.  EAST LIVERPOOL ANO WELLSVILLE, OHIO. NOVEMBER 20, 1886.  SINGLE COPY, 5 CENTS.  NEW ADVERTISEMENTS  I  DEPARTMENT!  Was never so full of Bargains as at this time. We have on sale  koo  GARMENTS!  ONE LOT  black Diagonal Newmarkets at $3.7.">; worth $5.00.  ONE LOT  I Black Diagonal Trimmed Newmarket** at ff>.oo, . worth $7.00.  ONE LOT  P Itlack and Brown Beaver Trimmed New-1 market at $6.50, $7.50 and $s 50.  ONE LOT  Boucl® Astrakan Trimmed Dolmans at $r*.oo; worth $7.00.  ONE LOT  Boucle Fur Trimmed Dolmans at $»>.50, $7.50 and $s bo.  ONE LOT  Miscellaneous styles, all new, at fo.oo, $10 00 to $20.00.  IP' ;t   SURGEON, OCULIST, AURIST  ■*^riie»e I'rices are from One I Tillar to ^ Five Dollars Below Regular Prices for Each Garment.  2fill East Market St.. East Liverpool, Ohio.  1} ULIlolLi)    UVtliBJIJ  The Great Leader and Innovator in the progressive school of Therapeutics.  HIS UNPARALLELED RECORD.  Consulted by lo,OOO invalids since Ills advent here. May 12, IMS, nearly all    or    whom wert*  treated by    him, excepting about loo who. uimhi examination, were found    lieyond    the  reach of human skill and turned away as Incurable. The great majority of those that lie accepted to treat have been restored to health, and Hie balance are improving. A < . issiiication of tim diseases of these sufferers are as follows :  ut’t In* Difrtvat i va i hwuns dearies* and freshness I* the most disllgured I 'Itvrafvt N GI Hie DlgeHll Vt UljrUHS ^ passionless, aud add bloom and hill  llano lo tile fairest complexion, Kc/eina, Impetigo fetter). Acne (pimples), Myphtldor, discases from Syphilis, &o.  One Lot of Ladies Jackets,  In Diagonals. Boucle and Beaver Cloths, trimmed ami plain. at prices from $:), $.150, SM $1.50, $5 to Ho  GI B HPECIALBAUGAIN LOT OF  Dyspepsia. Gastritis (inflammation of tin* stomach), Cancer of the stomach. Neuralgia of the stomach. Constipation, < brodie Diar-roo*a, Clironic Dysentery, Flatatenee, tins Iii the stomach, and Tympanum, gas in the bowels.  Discases of Respiratory Organs.  Catarrh, Asthma, Constipation, Aphonia, Loss of Voice, Bronchitis, Flimsy In all stages.  Diseases of the Heart.  1‘erecorditis, iutlamation of covering of the heart, Valvular diseases, Hypertrophy ion-largemeut), Angina foctoris, Palpitation.!  Diseases of the Nervous System.  Vertigo, (dizziness). Headache, Par;.!\ vs. Locomotor, Ataxy, Epilepsy, Choreal st. \ ii it-Dance), Hysteria, Sciatica.  Diseases of tin* Skin.  All eruptions and blemishes removed A thorough treatment will impart remail'alii,;  KY K IV EPABTMENT.  DK. BRUBAKER'S revolution iii the treatment of all eye diseases give* him a worldwide appreciation. The many diseases of the eve that have for centuries been unyielding to medicine ami pronounced incurable are now , by the ald of instruments aud eye meters here t of ore unkuow n—and Dr. Brubakers entire ow, thorough amt pathless treatment, restored ami cured in a most phenomenal way, as never before witnessed in the wort I.  At Due half their Value  Have no equal for fa tigued eyes  Bestore Presbyopia, or Old Bight.  Prevent and cure Dib-lopia. or Double Vision.  Beniovp Astigmatism, or blurred vision.  Give vision in Cataract.  DISEASES.  160 Children's and Misses' Wraps, I' Conjunctivitis.  Ophthalmia. Opacity of the Corm s. Hclerotis. Amaurosis Iretis, Betini Ptrygium.  At SOC. GSC, 75C, HSC, $1, Lf5 to 5 OO-  OUR OTI I i nt  9 Departments!  Are full of Good* to overfUruuiQ—ln>uaht awl contracted for before the late advance, arui are mAd at a email profit a terre conf. lei rue lot* of these Genre!* are being eerie! every day. We r canned duplicate at the jtrieet we are eelliny at. The cemclneiein of the whole matter ie, COME NOW AND BUY AND SAVE MONEY, at  Tumors of the iKye, Etc., Etc.  Those at a distance aud unable to call in person should not delay but send for  Dr. Brubakers Health Journal aud (jues-tlon Blank.  the qu“stions of which lf properly answered, will enable him to make a thorough diagnosis without seeing the patient.    (MB  Cataract removed, and Strabismus, or cross eye*, cured without the use of the knife.  spectacles, sold pebble*.  IMS KAH KS.  Trichiasis.  Glaucomia.  Htiiphyloma.  I.encomia, Keehymosis. Entropion. Ectropion. Epiphora. Tarsal Cry st s. Etc.. Etc.  I Pi  DCI  Diseases Peculiar to Females.  I'terma Dlsp!ac*om nt, Liieorrlnea. \ aginltis. Amenorrhea, scanty menses, Dismenorrlio i, painful menses, Chlorosis.  Diseases Peculiar to Males  Vareioeeie. Hydrocele, Impotency, Hper matorrlm a, .stricture, Ac.  (oust itut ional I)i seases.  Chronic Bheiimatlsm, Myalgia, muscular rheumatism. Gout, Scrofula, l'uariiia, impoverished blood, ive.  Trinary Diseases.  Bright s Disease, Gravel, or Stone iii (lie Bladder, Cystitis, or iidlaiiiiiiatioii of bladder,  AC.  Will cur** weak or deformed eyes  im bring Hypermetro-pia.or far sight, to normal vision.  Give sight and retain it. iii cases where blindness has been brought on by poor and Improperly fitted glass  tor  ■Air- ' KING'S oeTWi'Tce  !Ai > ■*  .A*#., f  t.  ll  ti)  If you suffer from any of the above, or any other disease, and have. been pronounced Incurable. do not fall to consult the Doctor, as it may save you years of suffering. or a premature death.  Office consultation ami examination free.  EAST LIVERPOOL, : : OHIO  The cheapest dry goods bouse in eastern Ohio.  m :■  'Afrits.’  The Ex-President of the U. S. Dies at His Home in New York.  OPVOMKTKI,  AN HON OK A It CK AND I SKFUL CA-REEK BROUGHT TO A CLOSE.  Special Dispatch to the Evknish Bkvikw .  New York, November 18.—Ex-Pre*i-dent Chester A. Arthur died at his home, No. 123 Lexington avenue, New York City, this morning at 5 o’clock. The ex-Prealdent has been Buffet log for some time with Bright’s disease of the kid-ncys, but his death was in the nature of a surprise, the gravity of the situation being known to only a few of his more intimate friends.  Chester Allan Arthur was for many year* one ol the best known ot New York politicians, holding under Presidents Grant and Ilayes the position of Collector of the Port of New York. During the war he Ailed the position of AdjuantGeneral Of New York. His noroinstion for the position of Vice President at Chicago in 1880, on the ticket wit"James A. Gar-field, was mainly due to a desire to placate Conklin# and his followers, of whose faction he was an earnest supporter. Upon the death of Garfield, September 10th 1881, Arthur assumed the duties of the Presidency, taking the oath ut office at his home on Lexington avenue, at midnight on the lDth. He made a very excellent President, and was a can didate for the nomination in 1884, receiving 281 votes, but was defeated by Blaine. Since his retirement from the office of President he has lived quietly al his home in New York. About a year ago it first became generally known that he was auf-feriug from Bright’s disease of the kidneys. He was a widower, and leaves one son, Allan, a young man of twenty-three, and one daughter, Nellie, aged about fourtefee.  Allover the country the news of the d atli «*f ex President Arthur is received  with ti .    .    ; - found sorrow. Prest*  dent Cleveland telegraphed Ii its condolence to Mrs. McElroy, the dead states-man’a lister, and with several members of his family wIII attend tin* funeral, which takes triste Monday. On the part of the Senate John Sherman, (leo. F. Edmunds, John A. Logan, Win. B. Allison, M. C. Butler, Jas. D. Cameron, I). W. Voorhees, Warner MilLr, Goo. C. N est, A. IL Gorman aud Jam# Iv. Jones will be present at Ute obsequies.  Called to the office of Chief Executive under peculiar circumstances, President Arthur si nm showed his appreciation of the responsibilities ot his new office. Knowing principles lather than persons, he subordinated individual preferences and prejudices to a well-defined public policy. While lie was, as he always had been, a republican, he had no sympathy for blind devotion to party; he had “no friends to reward, no enemies to punish" and he was governed by those principles of liberty ani' equality which he inherited. Hts messages to Congress were uni-vetsally commended, and eviu untriend |y crites pronounced Diem careful aud well-matured documents. Their lone was more frank atd direct than customary iu such papers, aud their recommendations, extensive and varied as they were, showed that be ha i patiently reviewed the field of labor so sadly and go unexpectedly opened tx tore him, and that he was not inclined to shirk the constitutional duly of aiding Congress by his suggestions and advice. An honest man, who believed in ids owu principles, who followed his own convictions, and who never hesitated to avow his sentiments, he had given his views in accordance with his deliberate ideas of right.  The foreign relations of the United States were conducted by Bepretay Ere-linghuysen, under the President’s direction, in a friendly spirit and when practicable with a view to mutual commercial advantage. He took a conservative view of the management of the public debt, approving all the important suggestions of the Secretary of the Treasury, and recognizing the proper protection of American indusiry. Ile was in favor ot the great interests of labor, aud opposed to such tinkering with the tariff us would make vain the toil of the industrious farmer, paralyze the arm ol the sturdy mechanic, strike down the hand of the bardy laborer, atop the spindle, hush the loom, extinguish the furnace tires, and degrade all independent toilers to the level of the poor in other lands The architect of his own fortune, he had a strong and abiding sympathy for those hread-winnera who struggled sgainst poverty.  The reform of the Civil Hervice met President Arthur’s earnest support, and his messages showed that every department of the Government had received hi* careful administration. Following the example ot Washington, he personally visited several sect ions of the United States, and (specially made himself acquainted with the great problem of Indian civilization.  President Arthur’s administration was characterized by. an elevated tone at home and abroad. Ail important questions we're carefully discussed at the council table, at which the President displayd unusual powers of analysis and comprehension. The conflicting claims of applicants for appointments to offices in his gift were carefully weighed, and no act-tion was taken until a1) parties interested had a hearing. The President bad a remarkable insight into men, promptly estimating character with an accuracy that made it a difficult matter to deceive bim.  or to win his favor either for visionary schemes, corrupt attacks upon the Treasury, or incompetent place hunters. lie has showed that he was guided by a wise experience of the past, aftd a sagacious foresight of the future, exhibiting sacrifices of individual friendship to public duty.  Possessing moral firmness and a just self-reliance. President Arthur did not hesitate at vetoing the "Chinese bill’’and the "bill making appropriations for rivers and harbors’’ tor reasons which he laid before Congress iii his veto messages. The wisdom and sagacity which he displayed in bis management of national affaire was especially acceptable to the bus! ness interest of the country. They tested his administration by business principles and they felt that, so long as be grasped the helm of the ship of Blate, she would pursue a course of peace and prosperity.  la dispensing the hospitalities ol the White House, President Arthur exhibited the resources of a naturally generous dis-  Ecsition and a refined taste. Hts reuu*rn-ranee of persons who called upon him, and whom he might not have seen for years, was remarkable, and bit hearty, genial temperament enabled him to make his visitors at home. His vigorous vitality of body and mind, hts manly figure and expressive face, added to the dignity of bis manner. A ready speaker, he at all times rose to the level of an emergency, and he invariably charmed thoae who heard bim by his courtesy of expression, which was the outward reflection of a large, kind heart.  President Atthur’a numerous triends contemplate the prominent events of his eventful life without regret, and with a sincere belief that they will be sustained by the verdict of impartial history. Utility to the country was the rule of his political lite, and he arrived at that high standard of official excellence which  firevailed in the early days of the Heputile, when honesty, firmness, patriotism and stability of character were tile char-fctensllcs of public men. Under his lead, the Republican party, disorganized and disheartened after the sad death of General Garfield, gradually became strengthened and unite i.  The American people are quite familiar with the dignified manner in which President Arthur permitted an modest canvass to tie made to secure him a nomination to a second term in the Presidency; with his failure thereof and his subsequent graceful support ot Mr. Bisine; with his cordial welcome to President Cleveland, his successor at the White House, and with the modtsty slid patience that have characterized General Aithur si coe bis retirement to a citizen’a duties, and the protracted growing 111-ness that has been noted in connection therewith. It ia sate to say that the public mourns with Allan and Nellie Arthur, aud with the aivers of the deceased ex President.  l.®tt®r I.Isl.  Tile tollowing is a list of the ltd ten re nuiiniug in Die East Liverpool postoffice for the week ending Nov. Ii):  James Burke, Miss Jula Kparris, Win. Foster, John Hough, Joint Hale, John W Harrington, Miss Mary 11 Hi un, Henry Hays, Lizzie Jones, F. A Loring (pack age), Joseph Price, Mrs. Haiah Brindle, Mrs. Hannan Arb Tyson, Mrs, Margaret McDonald, Mrs. lr. F, Martin, Edward Richardton.  All persons asking for advertised letters will please give date of advertisement.  ii. Ii. Hi m.*, P. M.  -- p »---------------------~s—  Physic inns say that there is no remedy forconsumption. In some chbcs this may he correct. We know however of many cures made by Dr. Bull's Cough Syrup, and we will guarantee relief.  The following correspondence, which explains itself, has been handed u** tor publication:  East I,iv siti'ooi,,O., Nev ll. I-***;.  Mr. (hah. DORN HACH that Sir What reputation lias VV ll. Hoffman in your city (tint aaa workman, lait personally), aud has there ever been a warrant out tor Ins arrest that you are aware of? lf so, what was the nature of the charge aioli list loin.'  You will greatly oblige me by making an early reply.  Yours Truly  VV. II. Kau,, Photographer  SMK V ANDO MI, Pa,, NOV, J 3, I KHO,  Mn VV II. Kau tune Sir: re reply, I would Male that there never lias been a warrant issued for Hoffman’s arrest, sud iii regard to his personal eharuetcr there is not a blemish. Hoffman eau come to Hiieuandoah tomorrow and will be received by a host of friends.  Yours Fraternal  CHAS DORNBACH.  A Lovely Complexion  "What a lovely complexion," we often hear pet sons say. "I wonder what she does folr it?*’ lu every case the purity and real loveliness of the complexion de pends upon the blood Those who have sallow, blotchy tares may make their skin smooth} and healthy by taking e nough of Dr Pierce’s‘Goldeu Medical Discovery’lo drive out the humors lurking in the system.    mu HIW,»' «    ♦    ♦    .    mull III HI  Frriwui) for Everybody.  Don’t fail to see the beautiful line of presents at the Atlantic Tea House. Presents given with tea, coffee, baking powder and spices.   - ®    p ®---------  Clerical Asher ply.—The Central Convocation of the diocese ot Ohio, will meet al Hi..Stephenschurch on Monday, the 23d inst. The Bishops ol the diocese will attend and all the clergy of the Convocation. The Bishops of Pittsburgh and West Virginia are also expected to be present. The Convocation will last for three days. The rite of confirms-tion will also tm administered.  What VV® Claim  We are the largest dealers in the State. We sell on closer margins than any other house in the trade. Oui goods are always fresh and strictly pure. We defy competition.    Atlantic Tea Co.  Ladies’ hand-turned beaver cloth con gresa—something nice—$1.  J. T King et Co.  I). A. Mackintosh will have a big lot of Thandsgi ving turkeys. Leave your order without delay.  Ladies’ solid kid shoe, button, opera toe, $1.    J. T. King rf Co.  Sudden Death ut An 01*1 Citizen.  Jesse Gorby, a well-known and re spected citizen, died very suddenly at his home on College atreet, Thursday at 2:1b m. Mr. Gorby was appal en tly in his usual health in the morning and ate a hearty breakfast. He came to the house from his work about ll o’clock and complained of a paip in his fingers and arm.  His wife tried to prevail upon him lo remain in the house, but he L«tt to go to his work again, returning at noon, when he became so ill that Dr. Bailey was sent for, but medical aid was unavailing and he died as stated above.  Mi. Gorby was sixty-five years of age laat August, and bad long been a resident of East Liverpool. At the time of his death he filled th# position of sexton at the Old cemetery. He was a good citizen, honest, industrious and faithful and leaves many friends to mourn his loss The funeral will take place Sunday, the hour not yet having been fixed upon.  A Cool ll®ail.  Special to Ta* Evemihu Review.  GRI moo, Pa., Nov. 17, lase.  On a saw mill a mile below bere the governor belt broke, and let the engine run off. Aa the engineer (Alex. Myler, from East Liverpool) ran to stop the en gine, the fly wheel broke, knocking actu of oil over him. He was in a blaze in a moment. He tried to brush the (lames out with his hands bul could not, and while the banda stood spell bound he walked to the side of the mill, took an overcoat and wrapped it around himself and put out the flames. He then walked to the engine and started to work as if nothing list! happened Strange to shy * he got off safe except bis left baud, which was burned to a blister. His coolness saved him.    Yours,  W. W. Bred.  The following letters are self-explanatory :  East LIVERPOOL,!)., Nov. 16. tass.  Mr. VU«i. A. McDonald, Steubenville, Ohio:--Dear Hut:—An article in last night’s Evening Bkvikw, giving the number of employes in the different potteries, etc , in this city, makes us have in our employ 18 minora. The report is supposed to come from you as official, I    lei    '  r repoi  correct. We have (to the best of our  and we think there la evidently a mistake in your report or the printers have it in-  knnwledge) eight persons under eighteen and over twelve years of age. Will you kitidly make the correction ?  Respectfully, Geo Morley rf Bon.  NTE) RENVILLE, O., N«V. 17, IWW.  h'ditor Devine, Matt Liverpool :-— Dear Sir:—Enclosed you will find a letter trout Messrs. Geo. Morley rf Bon in regard to  the number of minora employed by them.  I would say the number is na they say— eight under eighteen years of age. Whether I made the mistake or not in my statement I cannot say, and if such is the case, I beg pardon for so doing. Iii haste,    Respectfully    yours,  WM. /.. MCDONALD).  If people troubled with colds, would take Ayer’s Cherry Pectoral before going to church or places of entertainments, they woald avoid coughing, greatly to the comfort of speakers and bearer*. Th# Pectoral wonderfully increases the power and flexibility of the voice,  SI'GAU. SUG AU.  Eighteen pounds Standard A for $t, Granulated sixteen pounds for if I.  Atlantic Tea Stork.  Court Proceedings  Mary A Wilson vs. D. Snyder Hi Hon ; Judg iii at for plaintiff ; motion for new trial.  Ohio va, Abram Bombo; liquor law; idea guilty ; flue $ > and Costa.  Dido vs. Thomas Patterson ; indicted for being intoxicated ; flued $5 aud costs  Mary Ann Rogers vs. Nathan L. Kliuw et al; judgment by confession for $.')! I .$4 and costs.  J. I. DfGood vs Goo. W. (lively ; Judgment by default for f LIO and cost*.  Mary A. Gerald vs. Cornelius Martin, administrator, Ae,; verdict for plaintiff ; motion for a new trial.  Jacob Lower vs. Alma Heck ; judgment fo plaintiff for$ sd4 ho and costs, ac  Abram Hartley vs Elmer Gamide ; settled at plalntff's costs.  Frank McKee vs Edmund I*. Burnett; set tied ; Judgment for plaintiff for III no and coils.  Firestone Bros vs. Joseph Biggins et al ; decree ou cross petition and order to sell.  Maggie rt Kumiss vs. Miles Kumiss et a1; trial to fury , jury inipanneled ; verdict for plaintiff for fi.iioo.  Probate Court Proceedings  Assignment of Ostium L. Butts, Unity ; sale bill flied ; order of sale continued ; schedule of debts ordered.  Estate of Mary K. Cavanaugh, deceased Washington ; wit flied for probate.  Estate of Elizabeth I .ease, deceased ; inventory and appraisement flied.  Edate of John Myers, deceased, West; will probated.  Estate of Jeremiah H beeball, deceased Knox ; Inventory flied.  A. J. Vol kern, Administrator. Ac., vs. Ann Kupp et al, Centre ; liens found ; distribution ordered.  John I). Roberts, Administrator, Ac., vs Anna M Roberts et al. Yellowcreek • distribution ordered.  Estate of Alexander McCall*, deceased, Cutty ; J. C. Billingsley Appointed administrator. with will annexed ; bond fs.ouu.  Guardianship of Andor* V. Morrison et al, Centre ; new bond $5.ooo flied and improved.  Estate of Mary A. Sharp, deceased, Washington ; will flied for probate.  Estate of VV ll Schmlek, deceased, Haieni ; Wm Hclirntek appointed administrator; boud, $20,000.   ... -    - sp* —............—  Hay Fever Mutterers —Tile number of people annually afflicted with this most annoying malady seem* to be greatly on the increase.  • * * Tile editor of this journal is an annual victim, and with a view to discover a sperm *. iia* tried numerous remedies Of these,"Klyw’ Cream Balm’’ Is by all odds the quickest an irunt satisfactory, two application* greatly allaying tile usual s>mptams in the noseand eyes. We would recommend Its use by alt sub Jest to bay fever, and we gladly bear unsolicited testimony to Its efficiency Iii our own case.  • * * « •—Media, Pa., itecejrd.   

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