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Defiance Democrat Newspaper Archive: August 11, 1855 - Page 1

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   Defiance Democrat (Newspaper) - August 11, 1855, Defiance, Ohio                        VOLUME 11. DEFIANCE, DEFIANCE COUNTY, OHIO, SATURDAY, AUGUST 11, 1855. NUMBER 50. f ottrjj. HEADACHE AHD HAABTACOK. I sat beside her, My arm arouud her And listened to the sweetest words E'er dropped by mortal tongue. Oh, sweet it yet So new Her maiden fear arose She felt shs neeJad soiii excise t'jr siuing ij-iite so cluie. Shook by the strife 'twist will and fear, She gave a sudden start, And cried, My head! HIT aching head I cried "My heart! She laughed to hear my piteous tone. I smiled her art to fee, And promised I would "doctor" her If she would doctor me. Tlie bargain cliirnl, vritli gentle touch I soothed her aching head The tender word she gently spoke, My pain as quickly fled. Oh. might all heads by torture racked Find antidote as sure, And all earth's anguish-tortured hearts Obtain as speedy cure! value of his labor in market is mil that a working man has a right to; and when his la- bor is of no value, why, then he mast go to the devil, or wherever else he can. Eh, Peter That's my do you think quite agree with you, said Mr. Finch; perfect! v agree with "you- The value of their labor in the market is all that laborers can pre- tend that they should hare. Nothing acts more perniciously than the absurd, extra- neous support called charity.' said Mr. Collett. 'You're a clew fellow, Peter. Go on, my dear boy, go What results from charitable aid con- tinued Peter. The value of labor is kept at an unnatural level. State charity is state rob- bery private charity is public wrong.' That's it said Mr. Collett. What do you think of our philosophy, John j don't like it; I don't believe said Finch, Can't she carry on the oilman's busi- ness I dare say it will support her very well.' Why. said Mr. Collett; Briggt died a bankrupt, and his widow and children are destitute. 'That doea not alter the said Peter Finch, thing for her.' Let Briggs's family do some- To be sure said Mr. Collett. Briggs's family are the people to do something for her. She musn't expect anything from she, Destitute, is she said John. With chil- dren, too! Why, this is another case. You surely ought to notice assist her. Confound it. I'm for letting her have the hun- dred a-year.' Oh, John. John! What a break down said Mr. Collett So you were trying to fol- low Peter Finch through Stony Arabia, and turned back at the second step! Here's a brave in. You were quite right to gire the man traveller for you. Peter! John, hilling; I'd have given nim a shilling my-; your Arabia Felix, and leave th s tliat ence void of sensual followed, will tend thas lead to a greater length of days and thc soi] or in the attem t. Antl Mary Sutton, the only cbild of my old friend, Yes; I'll remera- Frederick Sutton, tbe sum of ten thousand pounds, which will enable he to marry, or to You would only stoop to conquer, hearing this, and Peter Finch ground his teeth she did not run, she said she tried to but, it: she also tried to scream for her but could not speak a word. The idea that she was paralyzed by the magnetic O C7 f ItVIlB VI It; ClUtllJlJ-'. ,1ft. 1.1 rt" C L 1 years m man's existence still there is a natu- a most forrmjable array soon stretched along Powcr ,of lnc first time she re- ral period for man to exist, and neither food, the soutiicrn boundary. So near did the op- maincd Wlth a long time-could not U-ll drink, nor sobriety can place him beyond that. forces come, that they actually crossed h.ow ]onS- Afterwards daily she staid with We find that each species of animal has its j bavonets. and the foes drank each others health j %.cm regnlail v boundary of life, and so has man. He has its in d old from the same Water S.he sald UuT llked thinSs hcst- and infancy, youth, middle age, old age, and then comes the winding sheet and the narrow i i'n goou oia uino irom me same water' j y d thcn melon patches and hen roosts suffert-d beyond ;she three eakos of maple sugnr that house., Bii precedent, and a faithful chronicle of the laid away, and sweet gingerbread v-r rt rillUCl Kllltlllll -w But how long does his existence how Umcassurcs us that Rt an unluck mc of, whenever she could, to give them nany years encircle his natural life? These tor one n; ht a Major Geceral of lhc O5lio snake would try to onve the srna 1 mnswf A f isvvt 0 n Kntl 4 li n f t i _. II fjirl Qltn C ttTtinl 111 are important questions. We find that thirty mililia was skinned by a fourth cor- jjears is considered to be a generation that is, file whole world is re-peopled every thirty J Jars with a new race, and a like number de poral of Michigan volunteers. Of course such civil, or perhaps we should The one away from her when fed, and she cuffed Isim several times, and he returned the compliment by tak- ing her fingers into his mouth several times, 1 _ _ say tfiieutf commotions, could not long escape muc l Consequently s attention of the General Government, and (1' l love snake s the t arts from it in that period. But no person f lllCi XJitiJVlrtI til lllJAlJtlUt 11 considers thirty years as the natural term of j the attention of Congress was earlv I one> she IS federally fi-nd ol nfeh's years being generally to the unhappy relations existing upon K'm Own as that limit. A nnnlc. imwpver. ivwnt-. ..i .1 ___. i n .1 ____ begin with. 'John and you deseive to conquer.' in a manner hardly May I gain my deserts, then said John., Both, however, by a-violent effort, kept silent. Are you not to be my loving wife, Mary The man'of business went on with his reading. And arc yon not to sit at needle-work in my j I have paid some attention to the character studio, whilst I paint my great historical pic- of my nephew, John Meade, and have been tare How can this come to pass if Mr. Col- grieved to find him much possessed with a fetl- lett will do nothing for us ing of philanthrophy, and with a general pre- Ah, how, Mary. 'Buthere's ference for whatever is noble and true over our friend, Peter Finch, coming through the j whatever is base and false. As these tendeu- j gate from his walk. I leave you J cies are by no means such as can advance him i And, so saying, she withdrew. in the world, I bequeath him tbe sum of ten' I 'What, said Peter Finch, as he thousand that be will thus be entered. Skulking in-doors on a fine morn- j kept out of tbe workhouse, and be-enabled to ing like this1 I've been all through the vil-, paint bis great historical as ilage. Not an ugly wants looking yet, they have only talked about. I after sadly. Roads shamefully muddy! Pigs j As for my other nephew, Peter Finch, he i allowed to walk on the footpath j views all things in so sagacious and selfish a j exclaimed John. j way, and is so certain to get on in life, that I i I came out pretty strong last j should only insult him by offering an aid which said Peter. Quite defied the old man I j but I like your spirit.' 11 have no doubt yon thought Oh, when I was a youth, I was a little tbat "8 .Trr'V "w, I the north -west frontier, and all their p nvcr was ly published in Pans by M. Flourens, which I at oncc t forth to st thc of created no small sensation m that city, j where it-was. Th succeeded in effecting the old age at eighty-five years, and tbe settlement of difficulties something after this faplete natural life of man about a century. wkc was to hold upon places first manhood between forty-five ,he tcn g? was revert to ohio> nfty-five, and second manhood from that f swamps. Manhattan, Toledo, and i nf nM acrP at that normH jn Q{ j Territory commonly called the Upper Penin-, sula. No adequate idea, indeed no conception i The girl's parents have changed thtir first. determination, and are now exhibiting the child and snakes to a crowd at Concord, N. H. On Paturday, they were by thousands, by which some ?500 were made. to seventy, instead of old age at that period. We are inclined to accept his view of the question as the most correct one. Buffon the WHAT FAMILY GOVEEJTMEHT IS. entertained such an opinion. The was at lhat time had of vast re_ rjde of life laid down by him is, that animals  a flood of words to stun him with a reason why many men, and almost all men of and the Qhioans thought a "gallus trade" I deafening noise to call him by hard names, nnnetttnfinn Itvo fnr a I I i_ t sound constitution may not live for a century. Tlie table of M. Flourens is as follows: hiuh way saiJ Peter. 'But the towards the completion of his extea- 'ijijaiox I the world, my dear cures us of all sive library of law-books.' fie dog romantic notions. I regret, of course, to see How Peter Finch stormed, and called names John Meade broke into delirium of grows for 20 years, 8 Tie horse 5 poor people miserable but what's the use of regretting! It's no part of the business ol the j Mary Sutton Cried first, and then laugh- superior classes to interfere with tbe lawsofjcd, and then cried and laughed together; all supply and demand; poor people must be j these matters I shall not attempt to miserable. What can't be cured must be en- Mary Sutton is now Mrs. John Mcade and dured.' her husband has actually begun tbe great his- That is to returned John, what we torical picture. Peter Finch has taken to dis- can't cure, they must endure [counting bills, and bringing actions on them Exactly siid Peter. and drives about in 1iU brougham Mr. Collett this day Was too ill to leave bis ffotuehold Words. bed. About noon he requested to see his i nephews in his bed-room. They found him propped up by pillows, looking very weak, but i in good spirits, as usual. FASHIOR8 nr FOBKHEADB. WHAT an abominable fashion is thnt i now j they got when they retained the frogs and we wnich do not express his misdeeds to load took the natives and unexplored wilds of thc Ihim Wlth t-pithets which would be extravagant North. applied to a fault of ten fold enormity or _ to declare with passionate vehemence that he "But now, what unexpected vision dawns. IMJ- .1 u j j j i l ls the worst child in the world, and destined to American energy has tunneled the moun-; the gallows. i.uin UUUUii UUi. ta'n. s'de> lnc sPccinc taxcs Paid on lnc i 'l !s to tvatcli anxiotibly for the first ris- lar- icaPlta' mining companies alone almost sup-; ings of sin, and to repress them to counteract 1 port tlje State Government. Mountain upon the earliest workings of selfishness to suji- and lives 90 or 100. 40 25 4 15 or 20 3 10 or 12 This is somewhat different from Buffon, but he sets it down as a gcr animals live about five times longer than the time required for their full growth. The mountain of iron bor of man question is one of deep importance to the whole UUI. Ol l Juman family. It is one to which the ingen-i relurn than Crtilforn'a Frenchman, has brought a great and he holds' iron piled up, only awaits the la- press the first beginnings of rebellion against and investment of capital to yield rightful authority to teach an implicit and n than California or Golconda's unuestionin and cheerful obedience, to the Well, said he, here I am, you see; prevailing of combing baek the hair from thc brought to nn anchor at last! The doctor will j forehead of children in order to give the face they're all in the j mark of beauty, descant as we lhay upon thc dark together the only difference is tbat the phrenology of full perceptive and reflective patients grope in English, and the doctors J faculties. The most beautiful women are those roe in Latin whose face gives not the impression of skeptical said John ness but rather sweetness and repose ieflbrt to draw tbe hair away from thc fa Let us change j it naturally grows is to give to that face ai bu the e as un- grope in Latin You are too Meade. Pooh said Mr. Collett. i the subject. I want your advice, _ _ j John, on a matter that concerns your interests. to those-rho, to attain a high" i I'm going to make my will to-day, and I don't j torture their scalps by a circular comb which, jknow how to act about your cousin, Emma i drawing the hair straight backward maktjt the Emma disgraced us by marrying an unfortunate wearer net more but j oilman.' An oilman exclaimed John. Golconda's j unquestioning and cheerful obedience, to the jwill of the parent j as the best preparation for investigation, and he holds! No longer do tht barriers of nature interpose a future allegiance to the requirements of the ap science, as presenting to all men a life of obstacles to trade, for hunvm industry civil magistrate, and to the laws of the great sobrietv. a verv extended fund of I ovf come them all. and now far away On Ruler and Father in heaven. that inland sea the white wings of commerce It is to punish a fault because it is a fault; are everywhere seen; and on its remotest shore because it is sinful and contrary to the a city is springing up which in business and i mands of God without reference to whether importance must vie with its sister City of the it may or may not have been produciive of ini- Straits. Such, Pensioners of the Toledo war, j mediate injury to the parent or to others, are some of thc fruits of jour labor, such the j It is to reprove with calmness and compo- in a feu Of knowlede in sobriety, a very extended fund of existence. Scientific American, VERY BOTCH. Too old Dutch neighbors in Pennsylvania were proverbially, steady, stnpid, and honest, they had carried on their transactions with their neighbors and each other for years, on the sys- tem of ready pay in cash or barter, but at last hard times came and they were obliged to re- sort to keeping accounts. One day they met for settlement, and after much hard labor and figuring it was made ap- parent that Hauns owed Yawkob twenty dol- Gazette. are some 01 tnc iruiis ot your UDor, sticn me i it is to reprove with resul.s of the perils and dangers you I'.aVe tin- isure, and not with angry irritation j worJs, fitly chosen, and not with a torrent of I abuse to punish as ofien as rnu threaten, and GOOD us cherish good hllmor! threaten oniy when yon intend and can rc- and Christian cheerfulness. Let us endeavor j member to perform to what yon mean, to shake off that sullenness which makes us and infallibly to do what you say. so uneasy to ourselve- and to sill who arc I', is to govern your family as in the sight of near. Pythagoras quelled thc perturbation.-1: Him who gave you your authority who will of his mind by the use of his harp, and reward your strict fidelity with such blessings Peter and feminine and male exression. This applies bold. himself on doing business at the store. Oh! yaw, mit notish. Well den, you writes do no'.ish." more bold, the Im-.r grow in us jkitire is not said Yawkub, "you r Xf ?n? the ,chllcl more beautiful and owcs me dc monjsh, JOu writes de notish. I A vulgar, shocking oilman said Mr. Col- natnral than the arts of a false taste the ish de way lett; 'a wretch who not only sold oil, bat' tortures of f-ishion can possiblv render hrr. Hums set about it and nroduced soap., candles, turpenUne, Wack-lead and birch- j Apropso is this rather rejoinder from! produced brooms. It was a dreadful blow to the family, j the Boston Post, whose editor, evidently, An olJ vras ,'d to appear as a 'witness on rnlht-r a delicate c.ise. She di'J not come, and a bench warrant was issued The (i-'.ngers of Calliolicism n are thus noiiced in the ChalMiooga The Know Nothings arc calling upon the of Tennetsec to nronse, arm, and to barJc to battle ag Her mai Well seems [cr poor grandmother never got over it, and a not one of the most devout worshipers st th laiden aunt turned Methodist in despair. shrine of unwomanly woman TeH. Brings the oilman died last week, The notion that high foreheads, in wome L .__ and his widow has written to roc, ask- ing for assistance. Now, I have thought of leaving her n hundred a-ycar in my will. women Bellas men, are indispensiblc to beauty, came into vogue with phrenology and is going out with the decline of that pretentious and -f i 1J. AIIU What do you think of it? I'm afraid she and "plausible scii-r.ce." Not long ago more don I deserve it. What right had she to mawy I than one fine lady shaved her head to eive against the advice of her frwnds What hate! it an intellectual" appearance, and thc cus- 1 to do with her misfortunes torn of combing the hair back from tbe fore- mind is quite made said Peter i head, probably originated h Finch no notice ought to be taken of ken ambition. When it is She made an obstinate and unworthy and let her abide the Now for your opinion, said Mr. Col- let. Upon my word, I think I must say the said John Meade, bracing himself up boldly for thc part of the worldly man. What right had she to you with great justice, sir. Let her abide the conse- you very properly remarked, considered that a great expanse of forehead gives a bold, mas- culine [forehead] comes the word effrontery will not be won- derful that the ancient painters, sculptors and poets considered a low forehead a charming thing in and indeed, indispensible to female beauty. Horace praises Lycoris for her low forehead and Martial cow- mends the same grace as decidedly as he praises the arched eyebrow." I Westmorland konnty I Owsh Yawkob dwenty Dollars For settle Up wen I hash No j monish do Pav him. Signed, Yawkub. tioii. i-ti i, v Mentis for her appearance-, on which she was brought, w.hy> inst CatkoKc chvrcht, thcW- Thc thoaghtit that thc census of 1850 gives as in Tennessee, was Us duty to repnmand her. What a yrand yc -tack Behold two thou- "Madam, why were you not here before' I couldn't come sir." Were you not subpoenaed, madam Yes, but I was sick." Then arose an unforsccn difficulty; which of the two ought to keep thc no'c. It was finally decided that Hauns should keep how else would he know how much to pay Yawkub In due time, when _ lit t l_ IV 1 I I t CIV Hauns. the debtor, got thc money, he paid up fotlndalion of :l about forty sand and eleven Protestant churches are to be j arrayed three Catholic churches! What a then outsiders arc called apon to join thc rhiin-hcs in put down these Ifirce CaU-olic churches O, Tempora What are we not coming to! Only think of thc iwo thousand and eleven Protestant churches and the outsiders against three Catholic church- _ PS. Will not thc sun stand itili to witness the The Sentinel states that the s'ono What was thc matU-r, madam I had an awful bile, sir." Upon honor, ma lam No, sir, upon my arm." and thus raised anorhei puzzling fcct, lald barc at H distancc of ended in the V m, Was at a dlstancc of several ft-et A school boy nofed among his play fellows il t lT n i below lhc surfaw' wnlle llic workmen were rx-1 for his frolics wuh the girls, WHS reading aloud WOU the public sqaarc in that village in when, coming to the last week. Corroded and incrusted remains phrase, make waste places be was i of a church was also found. It is evidently asked by the pedagogue what it mepnt. The jibe remains of nn ancient civilization. Gen-j youngster paused, scratched bis head, but incnt in the world, Syd- situated within tlie foundation wall are ,could {jive no answer; when up jumped a his friend Jcffery. and i the ashes, and mason works, where, doubtless, i more precocious urchin, and cried out I know that Hans had paid thc money. of a church was also found. It is evidently asked by the what it mepnt. Thc SPEAKISG of diminutive men who were j the remains of nn ancient civilization. youngster paused, scratched bis head, but among tlie most eminent CT ney Smith instanced his added that there was not giv- j fires were kindled, proved that tbe cheaper had not body enough to cover his conveniences of stoics were unknown or unob- roind decently with his intellect was imprnp-' tainable. By whom or when H was built thc crly exposed." cunnot tell. know what it means, master. It means hug- ging thc girls: for Tom Ross is alien h 'em roun'd lne waist; and it makes glad as can be.'' -v SFAPERl   

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