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Coshocton Tribune: Thursday, November 27, 1919 - Page 1

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   Coshocton Tribune, The (Newspaper) - November 27, 1919, Coshocton, Ohio                               HELP PRODUCE FOOD It is not enough to decry strikes. Production will help rut living costs. The Farm Bureau will help food pro- duction It's a progressive farmers' organization. Enroll! VOL. XI, NO. 87 V Coshocton Tribune FULL INTERNATIONAL NEWS SERVICE NEWS REPORT AND TIMES-AGE OEOULATION BCOKS OfWK TO ALL THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27, 1919 THE WEATHER OHIO Snow in northern part; snow or rain In .southern portion tonlghl: j colder Thursday local snows and much colder. THREE CENTS GARFIELD OFFERS MINERS 14 PER CENT WAGE INCREASE PUBLIC IS SILENT ON DEFEAT OF COVENANT Expected Flood Of Fierce Criticism For Opponents Fails To Materialize DEMOCRATS BLAMED Pro-League Solons' Hope For Overwhelming Public Sentiment Is Vain WASHINGTON, Nov. 27 ions that the country would turn with tierce criticism upon senators for de- manding reservations to the peace treaty have not materialized thus far, according to available information at the capitol today When the treaty failed of ratification last week, strong pro-league senators declared that the country would pound the senate until it accepted the treaty and the league. Few senators were in Washington today but those who could be reached did not indicate that they are receiv- ing an undue amount of criticism be- cause of the treaty's failure The trend of sentiment thruout the coun- try, as thev viewed it here tonight, was that the blame for failure to ratify has fallen largely on Democratic sen-J ators who refused to accept the Lodge reservations. j Even some Democratic senators who voted for reservations have escaped the criticism, of their party leaders During the treaty fight there was much pressure brot to bear from poli- tical quarters on Senator Shields of Tennessee to forre him into line be- hind Hitchcock A vote against the administration would mean the end of. his political career, Shields was told But today word was received in Washington that a political feud of long standing between Sheilds and former governor Patterson, of Tenne- ssce has been healed thru the sena- tors stand for reservations. Their po- litical difficulties date back to the time when both were leaders in Demo- c ratic politics in Tennessee Word reached here today, however, that Patterson has stronglj commend- ed Shields' pot-ition in the treaty fight. Patterson added that the treaty should never be ratified without reservations. Another indication of sentiment in Tennessee was collected in a telegram jecoivod by Senatoi Shields from Dan P.. MrGugm, general counsel, Tenne-1 spee association "Beg to advise that careful survey I discloses that it is the opinion of the majority of the manufacturers of the f-tatp that you are noting your firm convictions with reference to the league of nations, and that your con- clusions arc carefully arrived at." THE FIRST THANKSGIVING 1621 The photograph, posed after the famous Going to or "The First Thanks- Boughton, shows the sturdy founders of Plymouth po- ing to church to give thanks to the THESE FILED Almighty for His bount-e Tne picture is supposed to be ilL-blra- tive of tiie early spring ol on the day that _J been set aside by Gov. Bancroft of Massachu- setts as a day of prayer and after the winter in which the colony had been depleted by staivatior., elite lie and Indian raids. It will be noted that, de- spite their peaceful mission the Pilgrims were prepared for any eventuality, carrying their muzzle loaders to the House of God. TOM THUMB'S WIDOW IS DEAD! WAS 32 IN. TALL WEIGHED 29 LB. MIDPLKBORO, Mass. Noy 27 Tom Thumb, with her first husband General Tom Thumb attained vvorlu wide feme as mid- gets in tho luinuim Circus, died here toda> a( the ago of 77 Aftoi the death of 'lorn Thumb in the little who had amassed a foitune mainod Count !Uagn, another midget Mrs Thumb, whose maiden name was L.ivna Wan en Bump traced her ancestij b.ick to tho time of William the conqueror She u wonderfully brilliant little woman and had a ho.-t of friends, not only In the show bus- iness but iu other cncle.s the time of her birth sho weighed six pounds but stopped growing at the age of ten She only IIH lies tall and at no time weigh- ed more than nine pounds. rtm CABINET'S IS OUSTED BY ip-riiinnn GOVERNOR COX LAb IWUKU TO MINERS, OPERATORS Suspension For Failure To Quell Strike Disturbances Made Permanent Compromise Figure Is Below Offer Of Operators Of 20 Per Cent STATE DEP'T AWAITING A REPLY FROM MEXICO CITY Senator Watson Declares President Carranza Is One Of MINERS ARE INDIGNANT POORMAN TO APPEAL Original Suspension Was For 30 Days; Would Have Ended Thursday COM' -HUS. O, Nov 26 -Charles 10 Poorman, Democrat, has been per millionth removed :is of Canton by Governoi Cox This action was taken as tho result if tho hearing held at tin1 governors office jesterdav. in which Attorney Frank M SwoiUoi.ot Canton counsel foi Poorman, sought to prove that the governor's tlnrt) day suspension, made Octoboi "7, nistlTf; Poorman from the should not be made per imanent Poonnan's suspension was j duo to alleged failure lo do his full I duty in quelling stool strike disturb- ances Governor Cox in his order of dis missal, accused former Major Poor- of gro-s neglect of duty in tliatjment jn the prCSCnt Wage l W.IS glllltV Of I j. TA -G 1tJ i "Permuting peace and' controversy, Dr. Garfield, i good ordci to be disturbed hj mobs j United States fuel adminis- rioters without takmg necessary trator, announced tonight at to prevent them Government Takes Position That 14 Per Cent Is AH Public Can Bear (BULLETIN) WASHINGTON, Nov. 26. increase of 14 percent for coal miners is the recom- mendation of the govern- nt in the JENKINS STILL HELD WASHINGTON, Nov 26 are RETURNS FOR YEAR OT 1918 CARDINAL GIBBONS' SEASONAL MESSAGE BALTIMORE, AID, Nov 27 Cardinal Gibbon.s, head of the Catholic church in America, today issued this Thanksgiving message "We offer thanks to God this year because of the many bless- ings received from him during the past 12 months, in particular for the cessation ot the world war, and in our country for the pros- perity and peace we enjoy We thank him for the spirit of pa- triotism fanned into a warmer flame in the hearts of our people and manifesting itself most re- cently in the resolve to curb ef- fectually those forces which strive to undermine or overthrow the just and wise provisions of our government" Children Improving Helen Ernestine and Benjamin Shcr-l, A list of residents of Ohio trict 11 residents who paid income taxes for the year 1.918 is on file at the postoffice lobby for public inspec- tion. The purpose of displaying the list is that dodgers of the tax may be brot to the attention of the inter- nal revenue collector, B E William- son, Columbus. What subdistrict 11 consists of is not made clear in the communication accompanying the list It WAS the TO HUN IF HE SHOWS DESIRE TO AFFILIATE Fulfilment Of Treaty Con- ditions AH That Is Re- quired Of Germany steps to pre "IVumUing m citizens, pnrticularlv f  Cantwoll. G P Cantwell, S L Craw nations, btn this is believed to be ox-'WPr" no reporters-tint is shorthand ford, Route 1, J B Crawford, Rome tremly unlik. ly uncU, piesent ccmdi Pre-ent, so far as I Dolan, Scott Davis, F V Duller, Mrs Panline W. Voorhees, 49, wife I many channels of social and religious I-xirena Danford, W J. Dean, Route 7; 1: II W. Caton, A L Cat on, C M j lions Chnstenson, I D Conen. J W Gas Franco the povvr-r that closiros to singham, George Cassmgham. Janios 'keep German> on probat.on for a long- Carton, O L. dark, Burt Call, K A or period, but it is probable that Crawford, E C. Carr, Emma. Carr, France would bo overruled if she per- R S Curtis, J L Dickerson, J. J ]sisted m this attitude ho sald WASHINGTON. Nov cabi- sunco seemed to have developed a 'u u on the sort of do nothing policy, the mayor lo tnf' co'al mm seeming to behove that'll was quite ,Prf- United States Fuel useless for him to make .my attempt I Gai field to make its In .short ho did not exercise the (o thc minors and opera orKliip in any emergency to which the tors community was entitled, and seeming and the minors wore ly. no con. opt of the power summoned to the American Red Cross inherent in his office building at .r> o'clock this evening hut "In times such a.s these, no tempo-1 anpr itn tllev policy must be countenanced and   the min- of Mayor for Governor Cox's electee nor s rulings at yesterday's hearing NO FLU CASES IN COSHOCTON DOCTORS SAY ers "Wo are tired of waiting on tho pleasure ol Di said Frank Farnngton Another minor suggested fidjomnmont until tomorrow Chair- man 'J ho mas T Brewster of the oper- ators rapped for order and told both operators and miners to return at the later horn President .John L IjOwis of tho 'United Mine said ho would have to roriain rfom making any es- timate of tho ligure decided upon by tho cabinet in of Dr G.irfield's There are no cases of "flu" in Co- appearance Air Lewi? said: j Wednesday morning in bquiro Abbotts al nt_ aprord ,o stat j u> t BOVornment to mak9 court on charges preferred by State mf.nts from aU dractors Tuesday. Last good its pledged word to deal fairly Deputy Game Warden Frank Dinsmore Deputy for hunting on premises without the number of cases and the city schools Sec-rotary Wilson offered the miners a Colonel William Evans, provincial CHILDREN ATE TAINTED MEAT thread. Monday evening and Tuesday and one daughter, Pauline, who will Charles Heiman, A. S. Haselton, Hj, officer for Ohio, Kentucky and South- morning she became worse and hope accompany her annt Mrs Arthur Woelf- B. Hunt, C. B. Hunt, R T. Hunt, T S ern Province, Salvation Army, will was practically abandoned as it was fie, to Flushing, N. y., in a few days Humertckhouse, E. Hissong, E E.'have charge of tho services at the lo- realized that the death angel was near, "and make her home with Mr. and Mrs. -Henderson rotne 4, C. W. Henderson [cal Salvation Army citadel Sunday af- All Coshocton mourns the death of Woelfle. Mrs. Voorhees is also snr- route 8, J. H. Henderson, Burns Hack, ternoon and evening at o'clock eight year old Margaret Heigel and newspapers and other advertising rue- Mrs. Voorhees and a home in ,vived by her parents. Dr. and Mrs. F. John Hall, C. H. Howell, W. A. Hime- and respectively. Colonel Evans the serious illness of her two brothers' diums. thc city will be tinged with deepest1 A. Wernett, one brother, Dr. William baugh, Martin Hosfelt, Roy Hall, John has not been to Coshocton for four and a half sister, all children, is be-1------------------------ sorrow on Thanksgiving for she was of H. Wernett, Detroit, Mich., and one Hoehnes, G. Huff, W. H. Haskins, Rus- the purest type of Christian woman- i sister, Mrs. Walter Winters I sell Horn, Harry Hoffman, Jacob hood and her influence for good will i Funeral services will be conducted Hoffman, John Ingham, S. J. Irwin, long be felt in this community where Friday afternoon at 2-30 o'clock at the E. W. Jacobs, J W. Johnston, S practically her entire life was spent Presbyterian church by Rev. Joa. A. Karshner, Gus Krtaz, route. T culated to fill the citadel. Brigadier and Mrs. Dunham, of Gin- She was not only devoted to her and interment will be made at Kirkpatrick, Daisy Kennedy, George'night mooting The Silver band will iwill be saved a result of the timely illness of her brother Hugh Carnahan, lly bat her kindly spirit was felt fa I South Lawn cemetery. (Continued On fttven) I play for these services. consent of tho owner. They wore each ,j t .i- i j- i .were closed in per cent increase that ho was fol- imcci and costs, wmcn uiey ar-, in a number of the neighboring cities I lowing a pohcv determined by the ranged to pay and were released a nnmbor of lt 'man who Wtlb 8poke8m8n for the cab. j is claimed to be minus two of its char- met I acteristics which caused so many "We understood when Mr Wilson i deaths, la.st year. One of them is the miners 31 fi plus increase 'pneumonia phase and the other is the m wages, and an eight hour day, bank germ that eats the red corpuscles j to bank, that ho was following author I Truout the year the health depart-] it He summoned rs here on behalf ment of the state and nation have been ,of the government and wo accepted his fighting this disease, conducting edu 'offer on this understanding The pres- COLUMBUS, O, Nov. of cational campaigns in all cities thrujident snid in his proclamation on the strike that ho would authorize a re- port to deal with the matter "We do not understand that the gov- ernment can break its word If tho governments offer to the mi nors goes much below tho 31.6 per rent increase, this means that Sec- retary of Wilson has been turned down by his associate! in the cabinet years and his appearance here Is to be duo to their eating tainted meat, sold in tho form of head cheese. Coroner Hointz attributed the child's SUFFERS STROKE Miss Anglo Carnahan, Fourth-st, J jctnnati, will assist the Colonel Sun- death to ptomaine poisoning The lives 'fas called to Canal Lowisvillo, Wed- L. day, and have charge of tho Saturday of tho other children, it is believed nesdav morning because of tho serious i administration of antidotes. I who suffered a stroke of paralysis. LWSPAPLRl   

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